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Karolina AFORS

King's College Hospital
London, United Kingdom
MBBS, MRCOG
3169 likes
101256 views
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Laparoscopic dissection of sacral promontory for sacrocolpopexy
Objective: To describe the laparoscopic dissection of the sacral promontory during a laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy, with a special focus on anatomical landmarks and surgical traps.
Setting: Department of Gynecology, CMCO, Strasbourg University Hospital, France.
Patients: Women with invalidating genital prolapse
Interventions: Laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy is performed using three operative ports (one midline, suprapubic port and two lateral ports) and a 0-degree umbilical Karl Storz optical port. In order to suture a polypropylene mesh to the anterior vertebral ligament, the promontory area must be dissected. To improve sacral promontory exposure, the rectum is usually suspended to the left anterior abdominal wall by means of T’Lift™ tissue retraction systems. By palpating the area under the aortic bifurcation and the confluence of iliac veins, the sacral promontory is identified. The right ureter is also identified. Using two duck jaw fenestrated forceps, the peritoneum is lifted --retroperitoneal vessels are fixed to the vertebral elements, and widely opened. The promontory is carefully dissected until the anterior vertebral ligament becomes visible. As the presacral space is rich in blood vessels and nerve elements, surgeons are advised to preserve it.
However, the surgical approach to the vertebral ligament is sometimes difficult in obese women, when patients present anatomical variations such as a low iliac venous circulation confluence, a duplicity of middle sacral vessels, periosteal perforators, a winding right common iliac artery, or in the presence of lymph nodes.
Discussion: Laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy complications rates such as bleeding originating from the promontory varying from 0 to 4.7%, which sometimes require conversion to open abdominal sacrocolpopexy. Described by radiologists at almost 3cm from the sacral promontory, the right ureter can also be injured during reperitonization.
Conclusion: Laparoscopic dissection of the promontory requires specific and careful attention to be paid to non-infrequent anatomical variations.
V Gabriele, AJ Carin, K Afors, O Garbin
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
5053 views
224 likes
0 comments
07:24
Laparoscopic dissection of sacral promontory for sacrocolpopexy
Objective: To describe the laparoscopic dissection of the sacral promontory during a laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy, with a special focus on anatomical landmarks and surgical traps.
Setting: Department of Gynecology, CMCO, Strasbourg University Hospital, France.
Patients: Women with invalidating genital prolapse
Interventions: Laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy is performed using three operative ports (one midline, suprapubic port and two lateral ports) and a 0-degree umbilical Karl Storz optical port. In order to suture a polypropylene mesh to the anterior vertebral ligament, the promontory area must be dissected. To improve sacral promontory exposure, the rectum is usually suspended to the left anterior abdominal wall by means of T’Lift™ tissue retraction systems. By palpating the area under the aortic bifurcation and the confluence of iliac veins, the sacral promontory is identified. The right ureter is also identified. Using two duck jaw fenestrated forceps, the peritoneum is lifted --retroperitoneal vessels are fixed to the vertebral elements, and widely opened. The promontory is carefully dissected until the anterior vertebral ligament becomes visible. As the presacral space is rich in blood vessels and nerve elements, surgeons are advised to preserve it.
However, the surgical approach to the vertebral ligament is sometimes difficult in obese women, when patients present anatomical variations such as a low iliac venous circulation confluence, a duplicity of middle sacral vessels, periosteal perforators, a winding right common iliac artery, or in the presence of lymph nodes.
Discussion: Laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy complications rates such as bleeding originating from the promontory varying from 0 to 4.7%, which sometimes require conversion to open abdominal sacrocolpopexy. Described by radiologists at almost 3cm from the sacral promontory, the right ureter can also be injured during reperitonization.
Conclusion: Laparoscopic dissection of the promontory requires specific and careful attention to be paid to non-infrequent anatomical variations.
Laparoscopic type C radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy for cervical cancer
This video shows a standardized and reproducible approach to radical hysterectomy. The procedure begins with the dissection of the lateral pelvic spaces in order to identify and isolate the paracervix. After coagulation and division of the round ligament, the surgeon performs a T-shape incision until the psoas muscles to expose the field for the ilio-obturator lymphadenectomy. The paravesical fossa is then dissected in its medial and lateral aspect using the umbilical artery as a landmark. Following the umbilical artery in a ventral to dorsal direction, the surgeon identifies the uterine artery and the paracervix. Using the uterine artery as a landmark of the paracervix, dissection is continued posteriorly developing the Latzko and Okabayashi spaces in order to isolate the paracervix. Once the spaces have been developed, the lymphadenectomy is performed separating the external iliac vessels from the psoas muscle to reach the obturator fossa. During this step, the obturator nerve is identified to avoid injuries and to mark the caudal limit of the lymphadenectomy.
The procedure is carried on with the isolation of the ureter in its anterior aspect between the paracervix and the bladder. To do so, the bladder pillar is identified and the dissection is pursued between its medial and lateral aspect developing the so-called space of Yabuki. The bladder pillar is then transected at the level of the bladder. The rectal pillar is transected at the level of the rectum paying attention to isolate the inferior hypogastric nerve. The paracervix is then cut at the level of the hypogastric vessel and the ureter is unroofed.
The vagina is cut with monopolar energy using a vaginal valve as a guide and the specimen is extracted vaginally.
The vagina is closed with three stitches using an extracorporeal knotting technique.
G Centini, K Afors, J Castellano, C Meza Paul, R Murtada, A Wattiez
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
10123 views
343 likes
1 comment
07:20
Laparoscopic type C radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy for cervical cancer
This video shows a standardized and reproducible approach to radical hysterectomy. The procedure begins with the dissection of the lateral pelvic spaces in order to identify and isolate the paracervix. After coagulation and division of the round ligament, the surgeon performs a T-shape incision until the psoas muscles to expose the field for the ilio-obturator lymphadenectomy. The paravesical fossa is then dissected in its medial and lateral aspect using the umbilical artery as a landmark. Following the umbilical artery in a ventral to dorsal direction, the surgeon identifies the uterine artery and the paracervix. Using the uterine artery as a landmark of the paracervix, dissection is continued posteriorly developing the Latzko and Okabayashi spaces in order to isolate the paracervix. Once the spaces have been developed, the lymphadenectomy is performed separating the external iliac vessels from the psoas muscle to reach the obturator fossa. During this step, the obturator nerve is identified to avoid injuries and to mark the caudal limit of the lymphadenectomy.
The procedure is carried on with the isolation of the ureter in its anterior aspect between the paracervix and the bladder. To do so, the bladder pillar is identified and the dissection is pursued between its medial and lateral aspect developing the so-called space of Yabuki. The bladder pillar is then transected at the level of the bladder. The rectal pillar is transected at the level of the rectum paying attention to isolate the inferior hypogastric nerve. The paracervix is then cut at the level of the hypogastric vessel and the ureter is unroofed.
The vagina is cut with monopolar energy using a vaginal valve as a guide and the specimen is extracted vaginally.
The vagina is closed with three stitches using an extracorporeal knotting technique.
Management of a severe bleeding during laparoscopy for recurrent rectovaginal endometriosis
This case demonstrates the potential danger of a repetitive surgery after an incomplete resection of rectovaginal endometriosis. A severe bleeding occurred during the dissection of the recurrent nodule. It was managed through multiple coagulations, which could only be performed safely and effectively because important landmarks had been identified and retracted prior to resecting the nodule. A key point in the surgery was also circumventing the nodule in order to pass in sano as the bleeding came from vessels entrapped in fibrosis and scarring tissue which could not be effectively coagulated.
A Wattiez, R Murtada, G Centini, R Fernandes, K Afors, C Meza Paul, J Castellano
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
3069 views
59 likes
0 comments
08:06
Management of a severe bleeding during laparoscopy for recurrent rectovaginal endometriosis
This case demonstrates the potential danger of a repetitive surgery after an incomplete resection of rectovaginal endometriosis. A severe bleeding occurred during the dissection of the recurrent nodule. It was managed through multiple coagulations, which could only be performed safely and effectively because important landmarks had been identified and retracted prior to resecting the nodule. A key point in the surgery was also circumventing the nodule in order to pass in sano as the bleeding came from vessels entrapped in fibrosis and scarring tissue which could not be effectively coagulated.
Laparoscopic ileocaecal and sigmoid resection with transanal natural orifice specimen extraction (NOSE) for endometriosis
In 12 to 30% of endometriosis cases, the disease is located in the bowel. Caecum and small bowel endometriosis are found in only 3.6% and 7% respectively of those cases while the sigmoid colon and the rectum are most commonly affected in 85% of cases. The laparoscopic management of this disease has evolved drastically over the last decade, and even delicate cases such as small bowel endometriosis can be completely managed by laparoscopy. It is key to be locally invasive towards the disease but conservative with regards to organ function preservation. The specimen will be extracted through natural orifices and without any ileostomy. Our patients are commonly young and healthy women who will certainly benefit from a tailored surgery with immediate symptom relief in addition to minimum abdominal scarring can have a significant positive impact on patient’s psychological well-being and subsequent recovery.
In the present case, we present a 36-year old woman who was diagnosed with endometriosis and presented with 3 episodes of bowel pseudo-obstruction and dyschezia, and put under medical treatment. She was found to have multiple endometriotic nodules, with concurrent ileocaecal and rectosigmoid disease, for which a double bowel resection with transanal natural orifice specimen extraction (NOSE) was performed without complications.
A Wattiez, J Leroy, C Meza Paul, K Afors, J Castellano, G Centini, R Fernandes, R Murtada
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
1839 views
45 likes
0 comments
38:15
Laparoscopic ileocaecal and sigmoid resection with transanal natural orifice specimen extraction (NOSE) for endometriosis
In 12 to 30% of endometriosis cases, the disease is located in the bowel. Caecum and small bowel endometriosis are found in only 3.6% and 7% respectively of those cases while the sigmoid colon and the rectum are most commonly affected in 85% of cases. The laparoscopic management of this disease has evolved drastically over the last decade, and even delicate cases such as small bowel endometriosis can be completely managed by laparoscopy. It is key to be locally invasive towards the disease but conservative with regards to organ function preservation. The specimen will be extracted through natural orifices and without any ileostomy. Our patients are commonly young and healthy women who will certainly benefit from a tailored surgery with immediate symptom relief in addition to minimum abdominal scarring can have a significant positive impact on patient’s psychological well-being and subsequent recovery.
In the present case, we present a 36-year old woman who was diagnosed with endometriosis and presented with 3 episodes of bowel pseudo-obstruction and dyschezia, and put under medical treatment. She was found to have multiple endometriotic nodules, with concurrent ileocaecal and rectosigmoid disease, for which a double bowel resection with transanal natural orifice specimen extraction (NOSE) was performed without complications.
Laparoscopic Burch procedure: colposuspension for stress urinary incontinence (SUI)
We present the case of a 53-year old patient diagnosed with stress urinary incontinence (SUI), who was initially managed by a tension-free vaginal tape obturator system (TVTO) operation one year earlier. Six months after the initial procedure, she reported a recurrence of her urinary symptoms. She was referred to our department and a urodynamic investigation revealed a type II SUI.

Decision is made to perform a laparoscopic Burch colposuspension to reinforce the urethral support. This procedure can be considered a therapeutic option in patients with recurrent symptoms of SUI following vaginal sling procedures.
A Wattiez, J Castellano, C Meza Paul, K Afors, G Centini, R Fernandes, R Murtada
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
3457 views
110 likes
0 comments
13:33
Laparoscopic Burch procedure: colposuspension for stress urinary incontinence (SUI)
We present the case of a 53-year old patient diagnosed with stress urinary incontinence (SUI), who was initially managed by a tension-free vaginal tape obturator system (TVTO) operation one year earlier. Six months after the initial procedure, she reported a recurrence of her urinary symptoms. She was referred to our department and a urodynamic investigation revealed a type II SUI.

Decision is made to perform a laparoscopic Burch colposuspension to reinforce the urethral support. This procedure can be considered a therapeutic option in patients with recurrent symptoms of SUI following vaginal sling procedures.
Bowel obstruction: a late complication after laparoscopic colposacropexy
This video illustrates the case of a patient with bowel adherent to an exposed portion of mesh used for treatment of a previous apical prolapse. The patient presents with abdominal symptoms following a laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy.
In this video, Professor Wattiez performs an extensive pelvic adhesiolysis, detaching the bowel from the mesh, and identifying adequate correction of vaginal prolapse, without any sign of infection. Reperitonization of the vaginal vault and the long arm (sacrum arm) of the mesh was also performed.
This unique case highlights the importance of peritonization when using mesh. Complications such as mesh exposure may occur, however this can be appropriately managed laparoscopically.
A Wattiez, J Castellano, R Fernandes, G Centini, C Meza Paul, K Afors
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
1777 views
37 likes
0 comments
23:25
Bowel obstruction: a late complication after laparoscopic colposacropexy
This video illustrates the case of a patient with bowel adherent to an exposed portion of mesh used for treatment of a previous apical prolapse. The patient presents with abdominal symptoms following a laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy.
In this video, Professor Wattiez performs an extensive pelvic adhesiolysis, detaching the bowel from the mesh, and identifying adequate correction of vaginal prolapse, without any sign of infection. Reperitonization of the vaginal vault and the long arm (sacrum arm) of the mesh was also performed.
This unique case highlights the importance of peritonization when using mesh. Complications such as mesh exposure may occur, however this can be appropriately managed laparoscopically.