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Aroa ABASCAL AMO

Hospital Universitario de la Princesa
Madrid, Spain
MD
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Subtotal cystectomy with laparoscopic splenic preservation
Non-parasitic splenic lesions are a rare entity. Since they can generate signs and abdominal symptoms and cause many complications, their detection requires some form of treatment. The possibility of post-splenectomy fatal sepsis has led to the search for new therapeutic alternatives which simultaneously ensure the healing process and preserve the splenic tissue. The preservation of at least 25% of splenic tissue provides protection against pneumococcal bacteremia. One of the techniques used is partial cyst decapsulation with splenic preservation.
We report the case of a 17-year-old woman who was incidentally diagnosed with a 4cm splenic cystic with negative serological studies and tumor markers suggestive of an epidermal cyst. Radiological monitoring of the lesion is performed and a cystic growth of 7cm is observed. As a result, surgery is decided upon.
At laparoscopy, a splenic cyst of 7cm in diameter is found. However, it does not affect the splenic vessels. Lancing and draining the cyst is made and partial cyst decapsulation is performed with splenic preservation. The patient made an uneventful recovery.
Partial decapsulation of the cyst’s wall offers several advantages: it is technically easier to perform, involves minimal blood loss, it preserves the entire splenic tissue and has a high cure rate. It is an excellent therapeutic alternative for young people with splenic cysts because it eliminates the disease process without loss of splenic tissue and it is minimally invasive for the patient.
FE Viamontes Ugalde, A Abascal Amo, I García Sanz
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
806 views
30 likes
0 comments
09:32
Subtotal cystectomy with laparoscopic splenic preservation
Non-parasitic splenic lesions are a rare entity. Since they can generate signs and abdominal symptoms and cause many complications, their detection requires some form of treatment. The possibility of post-splenectomy fatal sepsis has led to the search for new therapeutic alternatives which simultaneously ensure the healing process and preserve the splenic tissue. The preservation of at least 25% of splenic tissue provides protection against pneumococcal bacteremia. One of the techniques used is partial cyst decapsulation with splenic preservation.
We report the case of a 17-year-old woman who was incidentally diagnosed with a 4cm splenic cystic with negative serological studies and tumor markers suggestive of an epidermal cyst. Radiological monitoring of the lesion is performed and a cystic growth of 7cm is observed. As a result, surgery is decided upon.
At laparoscopy, a splenic cyst of 7cm in diameter is found. However, it does not affect the splenic vessels. Lancing and draining the cyst is made and partial cyst decapsulation is performed with splenic preservation. The patient made an uneventful recovery.
Partial decapsulation of the cyst’s wall offers several advantages: it is technically easier to perform, involves minimal blood loss, it preserves the entire splenic tissue and has a high cure rate. It is an excellent therapeutic alternative for young people with splenic cysts because it eliminates the disease process without loss of splenic tissue and it is minimally invasive for the patient.
Laparoscopic repair of a diaphragmatic hernia after thoracic surgery with mesh insertion
Traumatic diaphragmatic hernias have been well described after blunt trauma. Diaphragmatic ruptures can occur in up to 0.8 to 7% of blunt abdominal trauma, with large left-sided defects being the most common. If the injury goes unrecognized, progressive herniation of abdominal contents may follow.
We report the case of a diaphragmatic hernia in a 48-year-old woman. The patient reports dyspnea and vomiting after left diaphragmatic node resection (diaphragmatic granuloma) one year ago.
A CT-scan demonstrated a large defect within the left hemi-diaphragm, associated with a herniation of the antrum, body of the stomach, colon, and spleen into the thoracic cavity.
At laparoscopy, a large rupture of the left hemi-diaphragm with a big herniation is shown. The hernia was reduced laparoscopically, and the defect was repaired with interrupted absorbable sutures and reinforced with continuous sutures. An intraperitoneal mesh was placed. The patient recovered uneventfully.
Diagnosis of a traumatic diaphragmatic hernia in the acute setting can be very challenging. In the chronic period, a myriad of symptoms and radiological findings may arise. Plain films, CT-scan, magnetic resonance imaging, and even diagnostic laparoscopy can help with the diagnosis. Laparoscopy is a safe and feasible method to repair traumatic diaphragmatic hernias, especially in the chronic setting, with the advantage of evaluating the entire abdomen and both hemi-diaphragms simultaneously.
FE Viamontes Ugalde, A Abascal Amo, J Delgado Valdueza
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
1438 views
63 likes
0 comments
12:52
Laparoscopic repair of a diaphragmatic hernia after thoracic surgery with mesh insertion
Traumatic diaphragmatic hernias have been well described after blunt trauma. Diaphragmatic ruptures can occur in up to 0.8 to 7% of blunt abdominal trauma, with large left-sided defects being the most common. If the injury goes unrecognized, progressive herniation of abdominal contents may follow.
We report the case of a diaphragmatic hernia in a 48-year-old woman. The patient reports dyspnea and vomiting after left diaphragmatic node resection (diaphragmatic granuloma) one year ago.
A CT-scan demonstrated a large defect within the left hemi-diaphragm, associated with a herniation of the antrum, body of the stomach, colon, and spleen into the thoracic cavity.
At laparoscopy, a large rupture of the left hemi-diaphragm with a big herniation is shown. The hernia was reduced laparoscopically, and the defect was repaired with interrupted absorbable sutures and reinforced with continuous sutures. An intraperitoneal mesh was placed. The patient recovered uneventfully.
Diagnosis of a traumatic diaphragmatic hernia in the acute setting can be very challenging. In the chronic period, a myriad of symptoms and radiological findings may arise. Plain films, CT-scan, magnetic resonance imaging, and even diagnostic laparoscopy can help with the diagnosis. Laparoscopy is a safe and feasible method to repair traumatic diaphragmatic hernias, especially in the chronic setting, with the advantage of evaluating the entire abdomen and both hemi-diaphragms simultaneously.