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Marian MORAR

Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg
Strasbourg, France
MD
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Common bile duct stricture due to an inoperable pancreatic head cancer: metal stent placement
There are several major indications for the endoscopic drainage of malignant common bile duct obstruction. There are several types of drainage: a preoperative biliary drainage, which is performed in selected cases (delayed surgery, high bilirubin levels, itching, cholangitis), a biliary drainage before neo-adjuvant therapies, and a biliary drainage for palliation. According to the ESGE guidelines, palliative biliary drainage should be performed according to life expectancy. If less than 4 months, plastic stent placement is recommended; if longer than 4 months, a self-expandable metal stent should be placed. In any case, every single patient should be evaluated for the best treatment. In particular, since uncovered self-expandable metal stents are impossible to remove, malignancy must be evidenced before placement of these stents.
I Boškoski, M Morar, I Crisan, L Guerriero, F Habersetzer, M Bouhadjar, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
829 views
83 likes
0 comments
18:14
Common bile duct stricture due to an inoperable pancreatic head cancer: metal stent placement
There are several major indications for the endoscopic drainage of malignant common bile duct obstruction. There are several types of drainage: a preoperative biliary drainage, which is performed in selected cases (delayed surgery, high bilirubin levels, itching, cholangitis), a biliary drainage before neo-adjuvant therapies, and a biliary drainage for palliation. According to the ESGE guidelines, palliative biliary drainage should be performed according to life expectancy. If less than 4 months, plastic stent placement is recommended; if longer than 4 months, a self-expandable metal stent should be placed. In any case, every single patient should be evaluated for the best treatment. In particular, since uncovered self-expandable metal stents are impossible to remove, malignancy must be evidenced before placement of these stents.
Removal of large biliary stones
Biliary stones can be easy or difficult to remove, depending on their dimensions. Understanding bile ducts anatomy, choosing the appropriate devices/extraction technique, developing confidence with biliary lithotripsy, choosing the appropriate size of the sphincterotomy, performing large balloon biliary dilation in appropriate cases and management of failed stones extraction are the basic key issues in the management of biliary stones. Here, we present the case of a 96-year-old female patient who had an episode of cholangitis one week ago and ERCP was performed with a biliary precut to access the bile duct. Since the biliary stones were large, a biliary plastic stent was placed and after unintentional pancreatic duct cannulation, a pancreatic stent was also placed to prevent pancreatitis. ERCP was repeated. The biliary stent was removed since the stones were approximately 12mm in diameter. A biliary balloon dilation was carried out to facilitate the removal. At the end, the pancreatic stent was also removed.
I Boškoski, M Morar, RA Ciurezu, F Habersetzer, M Bouhadjar, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
976 views
84 likes
0 comments
12:52
Removal of large biliary stones
Biliary stones can be easy or difficult to remove, depending on their dimensions. Understanding bile ducts anatomy, choosing the appropriate devices/extraction technique, developing confidence with biliary lithotripsy, choosing the appropriate size of the sphincterotomy, performing large balloon biliary dilation in appropriate cases and management of failed stones extraction are the basic key issues in the management of biliary stones. Here, we present the case of a 96-year-old female patient who had an episode of cholangitis one week ago and ERCP was performed with a biliary precut to access the bile duct. Since the biliary stones were large, a biliary plastic stent was placed and after unintentional pancreatic duct cannulation, a pancreatic stent was also placed to prevent pancreatitis. ERCP was repeated. The biliary stent was removed since the stones were approximately 12mm in diameter. A biliary balloon dilation was carried out to facilitate the removal. At the end, the pancreatic stent was also removed.
Postoperative CBD stenosis
Benign biliary strictures are often a consequence of iatrogenic injury during laparoscopic cholecystectomy or they may arise after liver transplantation or hepatic resection with duct-to-duct biliary anastomosis. Other etiologies of benign biliary strictures are primary sclerosing cholangitis, chronic pancreatitis, and autoimmune cholangitis. In the past, surgical repair was the treatment of choice. Today, ERCP has a pivotal role in the treatment of the vast majority of these lesions. Up to 80% of postoperative benign biliary strictures develop within 6 to 12 months after surgery with symptoms as pruritus, jaundice, abdominal pain, alterations of liver function tests and recurrent cholangitis. Prompt identification of these lesions is essential because long-standing cholestasis can lead to secondary biliary cirrhosis. MRCP with cholangiographic sequences is the preferred non-invasive method for diagnostic cholangiography. In particular, this imaging method can be useful in hilar strictures and in patients with suspected anastomotic biliary stricture after liver transplantation.
I Boškoski, RA Ciurezu, M Morar, L Guerriero, F Habersetzer, M Bouhadjar, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
982 views
66 likes
0 comments
11:04
Postoperative CBD stenosis
Benign biliary strictures are often a consequence of iatrogenic injury during laparoscopic cholecystectomy or they may arise after liver transplantation or hepatic resection with duct-to-duct biliary anastomosis. Other etiologies of benign biliary strictures are primary sclerosing cholangitis, chronic pancreatitis, and autoimmune cholangitis. In the past, surgical repair was the treatment of choice. Today, ERCP has a pivotal role in the treatment of the vast majority of these lesions. Up to 80% of postoperative benign biliary strictures develop within 6 to 12 months after surgery with symptoms as pruritus, jaundice, abdominal pain, alterations of liver function tests and recurrent cholangitis. Prompt identification of these lesions is essential because long-standing cholestasis can lead to secondary biliary cirrhosis. MRCP with cholangiographic sequences is the preferred non-invasive method for diagnostic cholangiography. In particular, this imaging method can be useful in hilar strictures and in patients with suspected anastomotic biliary stricture after liver transplantation.
Double wire biliary cannulation, biliary stone removal and pancreatic stent placement
Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is the most technically challenging procedure in digestive endoscopy. Cannulation in ERCP requires optimal training, understanding of papillary anatomy, and especially understanding cholangiography and pancreatography imaging. The choice of cannulation technique (contrast vs. wire) depends on the expertise of local teams, even if the injection of a small amount of contrast can better show the way and direction of the ducts. It is essential to choose the appropriate accessories according to the case that's being dealt with. Here, we present the case of a hemophilic 71-year-old male patient with elevated liver enzymes, and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) was performed to detect common bile duct stones. The patient has also a left lobe liver hematoma which originated from mild trauma. Endoscopically, the papilla of this patient presented with an ectropion and long infundibulum. Biliary cannulation was performed with the double wire technique, first cannulating Wirsung’s duct which straightened the siphon. After a large biliary sphincterotomy, the stone was removed with a Dormia basket. A small pancreatic stent was placed to prevent pancreatitis.
I Boškoski, I Crisan, M Morar, F Habersetzer, M Bouhadjar, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
630 views
54 likes
0 comments
18:35
Double wire biliary cannulation, biliary stone removal and pancreatic stent placement
Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is the most technically challenging procedure in digestive endoscopy. Cannulation in ERCP requires optimal training, understanding of papillary anatomy, and especially understanding cholangiography and pancreatography imaging. The choice of cannulation technique (contrast vs. wire) depends on the expertise of local teams, even if the injection of a small amount of contrast can better show the way and direction of the ducts. It is essential to choose the appropriate accessories according to the case that's being dealt with. Here, we present the case of a hemophilic 71-year-old male patient with elevated liver enzymes, and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) was performed to detect common bile duct stones. The patient has also a left lobe liver hematoma which originated from mild trauma. Endoscopically, the papilla of this patient presented with an ectropion and long infundibulum. Biliary cannulation was performed with the double wire technique, first cannulating Wirsung’s duct which straightened the siphon. After a large biliary sphincterotomy, the stone was removed with a Dormia basket. A small pancreatic stent was placed to prevent pancreatitis.