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#April 2016
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Low-cost laparoscopic appendectomy: how to teach
Laparoscopic appendectomy must be the gold standard. Nowadays, many centers still continue to go on with McBurney’s incisions. Why? Expensive devices may be a reason. Low cost appendectomy allows for a diagnostic laparoscopy and offers a therapeutic option with the lowest price.
On the other hand, residents must begin the learning curve in laparoscopy as soon as possible not only with a training center (training in cadaveric or animals) but they must also start practicing on humans with watchful surgeon/teacher’s eyes.
The aim of this video is to demonstrate that low-cost laparoscopic appendectomy is feasible not only for surgeons but also for residents operating with an expert.
S Rua, G Machado , P Mira
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
8988 views
557 likes
1 comment
08:49
Low-cost laparoscopic appendectomy: how to teach
Laparoscopic appendectomy must be the gold standard. Nowadays, many centers still continue to go on with McBurney’s incisions. Why? Expensive devices may be a reason. Low cost appendectomy allows for a diagnostic laparoscopy and offers a therapeutic option with the lowest price.
On the other hand, residents must begin the learning curve in laparoscopy as soon as possible not only with a training center (training in cadaveric or animals) but they must also start practicing on humans with watchful surgeon/teacher’s eyes.
The aim of this video is to demonstrate that low-cost laparoscopic appendectomy is feasible not only for surgeons but also for residents operating with an expert.
Small bowel obstruction and ileal strangulation by adhesions: role of laparoscopy in early diagnosis and treatment
Adhesive small bowel obstruction (ASBO) is a common surgical emergency, most frequently caused by adhesions. In the absence of signs of strangulations or CT-scan evidence (free fluid mesenteric edema, “small bowel faeces” sign, devascularization), a large portion of ASBO can be resolved using non-operative methods even if a significant number of patients will require an emergency surgery.
Laparoscopy in acute care surgery continues to expand even in cases of small bowel obstruction which were conventionally managed by means of laparotomy.
The authors report a case of a 45-year-old woman, completely laparoscopically treated, with a history of previous appendectomy with pelvic abscess, cholecystectomy and removal of right ovarian cysts. She was admitted to the emergency room five hours before surgery with severe acute abdominal pain which appeared 24 hours before.
CT-scan with oral administration of gastrografin showed signs of intestinal obstruction and adhesions were suspected. The exploratory laparoscopy revealed adhesive small bowel obstruction with ileal strangulation. The intestine was viable and resection was unnecessary.
The role of diagnostic imaging modalities is relevant to decrease ASBO-related morbidity and mortality. However, because of the lack of specific radiological signs and laboratory findings of bowel strangulation, the diagnosis requires, when it is not contraindicated, a timely laparoscopic exploration with both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.
V Guarino, A Cappiello, N Perrotta, A Scotti, F Mastellone, D Loffredo
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
1806 views
87 likes
0 comments
08:20
Small bowel obstruction and ileal strangulation by adhesions: role of laparoscopy in early diagnosis and treatment
Adhesive small bowel obstruction (ASBO) is a common surgical emergency, most frequently caused by adhesions. In the absence of signs of strangulations or CT-scan evidence (free fluid mesenteric edema, “small bowel faeces” sign, devascularization), a large portion of ASBO can be resolved using non-operative methods even if a significant number of patients will require an emergency surgery.
Laparoscopy in acute care surgery continues to expand even in cases of small bowel obstruction which were conventionally managed by means of laparotomy.
The authors report a case of a 45-year-old woman, completely laparoscopically treated, with a history of previous appendectomy with pelvic abscess, cholecystectomy and removal of right ovarian cysts. She was admitted to the emergency room five hours before surgery with severe acute abdominal pain which appeared 24 hours before.
CT-scan with oral administration of gastrografin showed signs of intestinal obstruction and adhesions were suspected. The exploratory laparoscopy revealed adhesive small bowel obstruction with ileal strangulation. The intestine was viable and resection was unnecessary.
The role of diagnostic imaging modalities is relevant to decrease ASBO-related morbidity and mortality. However, because of the lack of specific radiological signs and laboratory findings of bowel strangulation, the diagnosis requires, when it is not contraindicated, a timely laparoscopic exploration with both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.
Laparoscopic retroperitoneal access to ovarian cysts fixed by severe pelvic adhesions: a case report
Left cystectomy or left adnexectomy can be difficult in cases of frozen pelvis, with an adnexa entirely covered with the sigmoid colon and stuck to the pelvic sidewall.
This video clearly demonstrates the advantages of the left retroperitoneal access to the adnexa, limiting the risks of injury of the ureter and the perforation of the sigmoid colon. The different steps of the operation are as follows: 1) Lysis of adhesions between the sigmoid colon and the left pelvic sidewall to visualize the tube. 2) Division of adhesions between the sigmoid colon and the uterus to visualize the left ovary. 3) Left retroperitoneal access to the ovary with a longitudinal incision of the peritoneum, laterally. 4) Division of the utero-ovarian pedicle. 5) Retroperitoneal dissection of the ureter to completely release the ovary from the ureter. 6) Lysis of the upper surface of the ovary from the sigmoid colon.
JB Dubuisson, J Dubuisson
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
5220 views
297 likes
0 comments
08:20
Laparoscopic retroperitoneal access to ovarian cysts fixed by severe pelvic adhesions: a case report
Left cystectomy or left adnexectomy can be difficult in cases of frozen pelvis, with an adnexa entirely covered with the sigmoid colon and stuck to the pelvic sidewall.
This video clearly demonstrates the advantages of the left retroperitoneal access to the adnexa, limiting the risks of injury of the ureter and the perforation of the sigmoid colon. The different steps of the operation are as follows: 1) Lysis of adhesions between the sigmoid colon and the left pelvic sidewall to visualize the tube. 2) Division of adhesions between the sigmoid colon and the uterus to visualize the left ovary. 3) Left retroperitoneal access to the ovary with a longitudinal incision of the peritoneum, laterally. 4) Division of the utero-ovarian pedicle. 5) Retroperitoneal dissection of the ureter to completely release the ovary from the ureter. 6) Lysis of the upper surface of the ovary from the sigmoid colon.