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Monthly publications

#September 2018
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Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy for a recurrent GIST
GISTs are tumors of the gastrointestinal stroma which, although rare, are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the digestive tract. They are most common in the stomach and small intestine, in patients aged between 50 and 70 years. The definitive diagnosis is established with immunohistochemistry (CD117), and the risk of postoperative recurrence should be estimated. Studies relate small intestine’s lesions with greater aggressiveness; however, more recent studies emphasize mitotic index and lesion size.
The clinical case is that of a 53-year-old woman with a stage TNM IIIb, AFIP 6b gastric GIST. In 2013, she underwent a sleeve gastrectomy followed by the daily administration of Imatinib (400mg). After 3 years of adjuvant therapy, she stopped treatment. In May 2017, in a follow-up CT-scan, a solid, heterogeneous 6.7cm lesion appeared in the left hypochondrium, separated from the metal suture, invading the lower pole of the spleen, with no evidence of adenopathies or free liquid.
Surgical resection was planned. A splenectomy with distal pancreatectomy, documented in the video, was performed with no complications. The histological examination confirmed a 5.8cm tumor implant, located in the splenic cord, compatible with GIST recurrence (>50 mitoses/50 fields, free margins, prognostic group 6b).
JP Pinto, T Moreno, D Poletto, A Toscano, M Lozano
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
1424 views
2 likes
0 comments
14:02
Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy for a recurrent GIST
GISTs are tumors of the gastrointestinal stroma which, although rare, are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the digestive tract. They are most common in the stomach and small intestine, in patients aged between 50 and 70 years. The definitive diagnosis is established with immunohistochemistry (CD117), and the risk of postoperative recurrence should be estimated. Studies relate small intestine’s lesions with greater aggressiveness; however, more recent studies emphasize mitotic index and lesion size.
The clinical case is that of a 53-year-old woman with a stage TNM IIIb, AFIP 6b gastric GIST. In 2013, she underwent a sleeve gastrectomy followed by the daily administration of Imatinib (400mg). After 3 years of adjuvant therapy, she stopped treatment. In May 2017, in a follow-up CT-scan, a solid, heterogeneous 6.7cm lesion appeared in the left hypochondrium, separated from the metal suture, invading the lower pole of the spleen, with no evidence of adenopathies or free liquid.
Surgical resection was planned. A splenectomy with distal pancreatectomy, documented in the video, was performed with no complications. The histological examination confirmed a 5.8cm tumor implant, located in the splenic cord, compatible with GIST recurrence (>50 mitoses/50 fields, free margins, prognostic group 6b).
Laparoscopic left hemicolectomy in a thin patient, including anastomotic control using intraoperative fluorescence
Usually, Body Mass Index (BMI) is correlated to the difficulty in performing the surgery. Obesity is associated with a more complex surgery and a longer operative time due to difficulties in finding the right plane of dissection and identifying the structures. However, treating a thin patient may also be dangerous because the planes of dissection are more adherent, which makes it harder to identify the real embryological dissection plane.
This video shows the danger of dissection when the mesocolon is very thin and adherent to Toldt’s fascia or Gerota’s fascia.

The nightmare of colon and rectum surgery is the leak of the anastomosis. It may occur also with all precaution: no anastomotic tension, the evaluation of the vascularization may be difficult because macroscopic lesion, when there is an ischemia, would appear after some hours; the use of the ICG test is a good tool to control the poor vascularization of the anastomosis earlier and to correct it, hence avoiding the drama of the leak.
S Rua
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
2319 views
9 likes
0 comments
13:14
Laparoscopic left hemicolectomy in a thin patient, including anastomotic control using intraoperative fluorescence
Usually, Body Mass Index (BMI) is correlated to the difficulty in performing the surgery. Obesity is associated with a more complex surgery and a longer operative time due to difficulties in finding the right plane of dissection and identifying the structures. However, treating a thin patient may also be dangerous because the planes of dissection are more adherent, which makes it harder to identify the real embryological dissection plane.
This video shows the danger of dissection when the mesocolon is very thin and adherent to Toldt’s fascia or Gerota’s fascia.

The nightmare of colon and rectum surgery is the leak of the anastomosis. It may occur also with all precaution: no anastomotic tension, the evaluation of the vascularization may be difficult because macroscopic lesion, when there is an ischemia, would appear after some hours; the use of the ICG test is a good tool to control the poor vascularization of the anastomosis earlier and to correct it, hence avoiding the drama of the leak.
Giant hiatal hernia: pleural incision helping defect closure without tension
Incidence of hiatal hernias (HH) increases with age. Approximately 60% of persons aged over 50 have a HH. Most of them are asymptomatic patients and may be discovered incidentally; others may be symptomatic and their presentation differs depending on hernia type.
We present the case of a 65-year-old woman, complaining of abdominal pain and vomiting. CT-scan showed a giant hiatal sliding hernia with almost the whole stomach in an intrathoracic position. Surgery was put forward to the patient for HH correction and Nissen procedure and she accepted it.
Although a uniform definition does not exist, a giant HH is considered a hernia which includes at least 30% of the stomach in the chest. Usually, a giant HH is a type III hernia with a sliding and paraesophageal component, and consequently patients may complain of pain, heartburn, dysphagia, and vomiting. Surgery ordinarily includes four steps: hernia sac dissection and resection, esophageal mobilization, crural repair, and fundoplication. To prevent tension due to a large hiatus, relaxation of the diaphragmatic crura can be associated with the use of a mesh. However, mesh use is still a matter of debate because of severe associated complications, such as erosions requiring gastric resection. In this case, we decided to deliberately make a pleural incision, in order to reduce tension preventing the use of a mesh with all of its potential complications. This procedure, already described by some authors, is not associated with respiratory complications because of the difference in abdominal and respiratory pressures observed in laparoscopic surgery. The patient progressed favorably and was discharged asymptomatically on postoperative day 2.
C Viana, M Lozano, D Poletto, T Moreno, C Varela, A Toscano
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
2105 views
5 likes
0 comments
15:27
Giant hiatal hernia: pleural incision helping defect closure without tension
Incidence of hiatal hernias (HH) increases with age. Approximately 60% of persons aged over 50 have a HH. Most of them are asymptomatic patients and may be discovered incidentally; others may be symptomatic and their presentation differs depending on hernia type.
We present the case of a 65-year-old woman, complaining of abdominal pain and vomiting. CT-scan showed a giant hiatal sliding hernia with almost the whole stomach in an intrathoracic position. Surgery was put forward to the patient for HH correction and Nissen procedure and she accepted it.
Although a uniform definition does not exist, a giant HH is considered a hernia which includes at least 30% of the stomach in the chest. Usually, a giant HH is a type III hernia with a sliding and paraesophageal component, and consequently patients may complain of pain, heartburn, dysphagia, and vomiting. Surgery ordinarily includes four steps: hernia sac dissection and resection, esophageal mobilization, crural repair, and fundoplication. To prevent tension due to a large hiatus, relaxation of the diaphragmatic crura can be associated with the use of a mesh. However, mesh use is still a matter of debate because of severe associated complications, such as erosions requiring gastric resection. In this case, we decided to deliberately make a pleural incision, in order to reduce tension preventing the use of a mesh with all of its potential complications. This procedure, already described by some authors, is not associated with respiratory complications because of the difference in abdominal and respiratory pressures observed in laparoscopic surgery. The patient progressed favorably and was discharged asymptomatically on postoperative day 2.
Robotic triple docking ultralow anterior resection with intersphincteric resection and coloanal anastomosis
The da Vinci™ surgical robotic system with its increased instrument stability, magnified tridimensional view, and dexterity with 7 degrees of wristed motion of its instruments offers a distinct surgical advantage over traditional laparoscopic instruments. This is especially true in the deep pelvis, where the limited space and visibility make it extremely challenging to perform distal rectal dissection. Additionally, the complete control of the surgeon over the stable surgical platform allows fine and accurate dissection in this area.
For very low rectal tumors close to the anorectal junction, if a sphincter-saving procedure is to be attempted, surgeons will frequently perform an intersphincteric resection (ISR) with a handsewn coloanal anastomosis. If successful, the patient will be able to avoid an abdominoperineal resection and its resulting permanent stoma.
ISR is a technically challenging procedure to perform, especially in male and obese patients. It is because the approach to the intersphincteric plane from the abdominal approach is deep within the pelvis and frequently curves anteriorly, which makes the intersphincteric plane challenging to approach laparoscopically. In addition, ISR from the perineum is also difficult as the anus has a small opening; as a result, when the surgeon sits directly in front of the perineum, assistants will be unable to adequately visualize the operating field, making it very challenging to properly assist for the dissection. It may potentially result in some blind dissection, which may lead to entry into the wrong plane and a poor oncological specimen.
With the da Vinci™ surgical robotic system, this problem can potentially be minimized. First, via the transabdominal approach, the robotic system is able to access deep into the pelvic cavity and dissect down to the intersphincteric plane beyond the puborectalis sling. Secondly, docking the robot and approaching the ISR perineally, the robotic system can also provide a magnified vision, a fine dissection and allow the assistant a good viewing position sitting in front of the perineum to assist in a more productive manner. These advantages of the robotic system will facilitate ISR dissection and retrieval of a superior oncological specimen.
This video features a totally robotic triple docking approach for an ultralow anterior resection with intersphincteric resection and handsewn coloanal anastomosis in a male patient with a low rectal cancer.
SAE Yeo
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
1233 views
5 likes
0 comments
15:36
Robotic triple docking ultralow anterior resection with intersphincteric resection and coloanal anastomosis
The da Vinci™ surgical robotic system with its increased instrument stability, magnified tridimensional view, and dexterity with 7 degrees of wristed motion of its instruments offers a distinct surgical advantage over traditional laparoscopic instruments. This is especially true in the deep pelvis, where the limited space and visibility make it extremely challenging to perform distal rectal dissection. Additionally, the complete control of the surgeon over the stable surgical platform allows fine and accurate dissection in this area.
For very low rectal tumors close to the anorectal junction, if a sphincter-saving procedure is to be attempted, surgeons will frequently perform an intersphincteric resection (ISR) with a handsewn coloanal anastomosis. If successful, the patient will be able to avoid an abdominoperineal resection and its resulting permanent stoma.
ISR is a technically challenging procedure to perform, especially in male and obese patients. It is because the approach to the intersphincteric plane from the abdominal approach is deep within the pelvis and frequently curves anteriorly, which makes the intersphincteric plane challenging to approach laparoscopically. In addition, ISR from the perineum is also difficult as the anus has a small opening; as a result, when the surgeon sits directly in front of the perineum, assistants will be unable to adequately visualize the operating field, making it very challenging to properly assist for the dissection. It may potentially result in some blind dissection, which may lead to entry into the wrong plane and a poor oncological specimen.
With the da Vinci™ surgical robotic system, this problem can potentially be minimized. First, via the transabdominal approach, the robotic system is able to access deep into the pelvic cavity and dissect down to the intersphincteric plane beyond the puborectalis sling. Secondly, docking the robot and approaching the ISR perineally, the robotic system can also provide a magnified vision, a fine dissection and allow the assistant a good viewing position sitting in front of the perineum to assist in a more productive manner. These advantages of the robotic system will facilitate ISR dissection and retrieval of a superior oncological specimen.
This video features a totally robotic triple docking approach for an ultralow anterior resection with intersphincteric resection and handsewn coloanal anastomosis in a male patient with a low rectal cancer.
Laparoscopic left hepatectomy with extrahepatic inflow and outflow exclusion
This is the case of a 72-year-old woman presenting with a 5cm intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma arising on an HCV-related well-compensated chronic liver disease without portal hypertension. Laparoscopic left hepatectomy (liver segments 2, 3, and 4) was decided upon. Four ports were placed. The procedure began with a complete abdominal exploration and intraoperative liver ultrasonography, which allowed to identify the tumor between liver segments 2 and 4a in close contact with the left hepatic vein.
Hilar dissection was performed with lymphadenectomy of the common hepatic artery and left hepatic artery.
Before parenchymal transection, both inflow and outflow of the left liver were interrupted. The left hepatic artery and the left portal vein were isolated and divided between clips. The left hepatic vein was isolated after division of the Arantius’ ligament and clamped by means of a laparoscopic vascular clamp. Parenchymal transection was carried out using an ultrasonic dissector (CUSA™), and hemostasis was controlled with a radiofrequency bipolar hemostatic sealer (Aquamantys™) and clips. The biliary duct and the left hepatic vein were managed with vascular staplers. At the end of the operation, a tubular drain was placed. Operative time accounted for 240 minutes and total blood loss was 100mL.
The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 6.
The pathology confirmed a 5cm G3 cholangiocarcinoma with invasion of the left hepatic vein and of segment 2 portal branch. Resection margins were negative for tumor invasion and for all lymph nodes retrieved.
C Sposito, D Citterio, C Battiston, V Mazzaferro
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
1672 views
6 likes
0 comments
10:57
Laparoscopic left hepatectomy with extrahepatic inflow and outflow exclusion
This is the case of a 72-year-old woman presenting with a 5cm intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma arising on an HCV-related well-compensated chronic liver disease without portal hypertension. Laparoscopic left hepatectomy (liver segments 2, 3, and 4) was decided upon. Four ports were placed. The procedure began with a complete abdominal exploration and intraoperative liver ultrasonography, which allowed to identify the tumor between liver segments 2 and 4a in close contact with the left hepatic vein.
Hilar dissection was performed with lymphadenectomy of the common hepatic artery and left hepatic artery.
Before parenchymal transection, both inflow and outflow of the left liver were interrupted. The left hepatic artery and the left portal vein were isolated and divided between clips. The left hepatic vein was isolated after division of the Arantius’ ligament and clamped by means of a laparoscopic vascular clamp. Parenchymal transection was carried out using an ultrasonic dissector (CUSA™), and hemostasis was controlled with a radiofrequency bipolar hemostatic sealer (Aquamantys™) and clips. The biliary duct and the left hepatic vein were managed with vascular staplers. At the end of the operation, a tubular drain was placed. Operative time accounted for 240 minutes and total blood loss was 100mL.
The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 6.
The pathology confirmed a 5cm G3 cholangiocarcinoma with invasion of the left hepatic vein and of segment 2 portal branch. Resection margins were negative for tumor invasion and for all lymph nodes retrieved.