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Robotic surgery

Find all the surgical interventions, lectures, experts opinions, debates, webinars and operative techniques per specialty.


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LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: robotic low anterior resection for a local recurrence of rectal cancer
In this live interactive surgery, Dr. Parra-Davila demonstrates a robotic low anterior resection for a local recurrence of transanally excised rectal cancer. The operative technique shown includes a robotic oncological ‘en bloc’ resection and intracorporeal anastomosis. In the patient’s history, an ulcerated villous polyp too large for endoscopic removal was addressed to surgery. Preoperative biopsies had failed to detect malignancy. The surgical procedure consisted in a transanal full-thickness resection including partial TME for lymph node sampling. Since the operative specimen revealed a pT2N1a (1/8) rectal adenocarcinoma, the patient underwent adjuvant radiochemotherapy. The following year, a single hepatic metastasis was resected, complemented by postoperative chemotherapy. After 7 years of uneventful follow-up, an anastomotic recurrence was diagnosed. Following oncologic committee discussion, the patient was advised to undergo surgery.
E Parra-Davila, M Ignat, L Soler, B Seeliger, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
27 days ago
662 views
1 like
0 comments
32:48
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: robotic low anterior resection for a local recurrence of rectal cancer
In this live interactive surgery, Dr. Parra-Davila demonstrates a robotic low anterior resection for a local recurrence of transanally excised rectal cancer. The operative technique shown includes a robotic oncological ‘en bloc’ resection and intracorporeal anastomosis. In the patient’s history, an ulcerated villous polyp too large for endoscopic removal was addressed to surgery. Preoperative biopsies had failed to detect malignancy. The surgical procedure consisted in a transanal full-thickness resection including partial TME for lymph node sampling. Since the operative specimen revealed a pT2N1a (1/8) rectal adenocarcinoma, the patient underwent adjuvant radiochemotherapy. The following year, a single hepatic metastasis was resected, complemented by postoperative chemotherapy. After 7 years of uneventful follow-up, an anastomotic recurrence was diagnosed. Following oncologic committee discussion, the patient was advised to undergo surgery.
Robotic triple docking ultralow anterior resection with intersphincteric resection and coloanal anastomosis
The da Vinci™ surgical robotic system with its increased instrument stability, magnified tridimensional view, and dexterity with 7 degrees of wristed motion of its instruments offers a distinct surgical advantage over traditional laparoscopic instruments. This is especially true in the deep pelvis, where the limited space and visibility make it extremely challenging to perform distal rectal dissection. Additionally, the complete control of the surgeon over the stable surgical platform allows fine and accurate dissection in this area.
For very low rectal tumors close to the anorectal junction, if a sphincter-saving procedure is to be attempted, surgeons will frequently perform an intersphincteric resection (ISR) with a handsewn coloanal anastomosis. If successful, the patient will be able to avoid an abdominoperineal resection and its resulting permanent stoma.
ISR is a technically challenging procedure to perform, especially in male and obese patients. It is because the approach to the intersphincteric plane from the abdominal approach is deep within the pelvis and frequently curves anteriorly, which makes the intersphincteric plane challenging to approach laparoscopically. In addition, ISR from the perineum is also difficult as the anus has a small opening; as a result, when the surgeon sits directly in front of the perineum, assistants will be unable to adequately visualize the operating field, making it very challenging to properly assist for the dissection. It may potentially result in some blind dissection, which may lead to entry into the wrong plane and a poor oncological specimen.
With the da Vinci™ surgical robotic system, this problem can potentially be minimized. First, via the transabdominal approach, the robotic system is able to access deep into the pelvic cavity and dissect down to the intersphincteric plane beyond the puborectalis sling. Secondly, docking the robot and approaching the ISR perineally, the robotic system can also provide a magnified vision, a fine dissection and allow the assistant a good viewing position sitting in front of the perineum to assist in a more productive manner. These advantages of the robotic system will facilitate ISR dissection and retrieval of a superior oncological specimen.
This video features a totally robotic triple docking approach for an ultralow anterior resection with intersphincteric resection and handsewn coloanal anastomosis in a male patient with a low rectal cancer.
SAE Yeo
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
1233 views
5 likes
0 comments
15:36
Robotic triple docking ultralow anterior resection with intersphincteric resection and coloanal anastomosis
The da Vinci™ surgical robotic system with its increased instrument stability, magnified tridimensional view, and dexterity with 7 degrees of wristed motion of its instruments offers a distinct surgical advantage over traditional laparoscopic instruments. This is especially true in the deep pelvis, where the limited space and visibility make it extremely challenging to perform distal rectal dissection. Additionally, the complete control of the surgeon over the stable surgical platform allows fine and accurate dissection in this area.
For very low rectal tumors close to the anorectal junction, if a sphincter-saving procedure is to be attempted, surgeons will frequently perform an intersphincteric resection (ISR) with a handsewn coloanal anastomosis. If successful, the patient will be able to avoid an abdominoperineal resection and its resulting permanent stoma.
ISR is a technically challenging procedure to perform, especially in male and obese patients. It is because the approach to the intersphincteric plane from the abdominal approach is deep within the pelvis and frequently curves anteriorly, which makes the intersphincteric plane challenging to approach laparoscopically. In addition, ISR from the perineum is also difficult as the anus has a small opening; as a result, when the surgeon sits directly in front of the perineum, assistants will be unable to adequately visualize the operating field, making it very challenging to properly assist for the dissection. It may potentially result in some blind dissection, which may lead to entry into the wrong plane and a poor oncological specimen.
With the da Vinci™ surgical robotic system, this problem can potentially be minimized. First, via the transabdominal approach, the robotic system is able to access deep into the pelvic cavity and dissect down to the intersphincteric plane beyond the puborectalis sling. Secondly, docking the robot and approaching the ISR perineally, the robotic system can also provide a magnified vision, a fine dissection and allow the assistant a good viewing position sitting in front of the perineum to assist in a more productive manner. These advantages of the robotic system will facilitate ISR dissection and retrieval of a superior oncological specimen.
This video features a totally robotic triple docking approach for an ultralow anterior resection with intersphincteric resection and handsewn coloanal anastomosis in a male patient with a low rectal cancer.
Robotic Heller myotomy with Dor fundoplication for esophageal achalasia
Achalasia is an esophageal motility disorder characterized by an incomplete or absent esophagogastric junction (EGJ) relaxation associated with loss of peristalsis or uncoordinated contractions of the esophageal body in response to swallowing. All available treatments for achalasia are palliative, directed towards the elimination of the outflow resistance caused by abnormal lower esophageal sphincter (LES) function and aiming to improve the symptoms related to esophageal stasis, such as dysphagia and regurgitation. Laparoscopic Heller myotomy with partial fundoplication is the current standard of care for the treatment of achalasia. It is associated with symptom improvement or relief in about 90% of patients. However, it is a challenging procedure with the potential risk of esophageal perforation reported in up to 10% of cases. Interestingly, laparoscopic myotomy has some limitations which depend on the laparoscopic technique (bidimensional vision, poor range of movement) and on the surgeon’s experience. Recently, the use of the robotic technology has been proposed claiming that it might reduce intraoperative esophageal perforation rates and improve postoperative quality of life after Heller myotomy, mainly due to the 3D view and enhanced dexterity of the surgeon. Despite significant improvements in surgical treatment, the length of myotomy is still a matter of debate to date. Substantially, although some authors proposed a limited myotomy on the lower esophagus preserving a small portion of the LES to prevent postoperative reflux, most authors recommended a myotomy extending 4 to 6cm on the esophagus and 1 to 2cm on the gastric side. In this video, we performed a 6cm long esophagogastric myotomy, with a 2.5cm proximal extension above the Z-line (endoscopically recognized) and a 3.5cm distal extension below the same landmark. In a previous experimental study with intraoperative computerized manometry, we observed that myotomy of the esophageal portion of the LES (without dissection of the gastric fibers) did not lead to any significant variation in sphincteric pressure. Instead, the dissection of the gastric fibers for at least 2 to 2.5cm on the anterior gastric wall created a significant modification of the LES pressure profile. This may be due to the interruption of the anterior portion of gastric semicircular clasp and sling fibers, with consequent loss of their hook properties on the LES pressure profile.
L Marano, A Spaziani, G Castagnoli
Surgical intervention
6 months ago
810 views
4 likes
0 comments
08:13
Robotic Heller myotomy with Dor fundoplication for esophageal achalasia
Achalasia is an esophageal motility disorder characterized by an incomplete or absent esophagogastric junction (EGJ) relaxation associated with loss of peristalsis or uncoordinated contractions of the esophageal body in response to swallowing. All available treatments for achalasia are palliative, directed towards the elimination of the outflow resistance caused by abnormal lower esophageal sphincter (LES) function and aiming to improve the symptoms related to esophageal stasis, such as dysphagia and regurgitation. Laparoscopic Heller myotomy with partial fundoplication is the current standard of care for the treatment of achalasia. It is associated with symptom improvement or relief in about 90% of patients. However, it is a challenging procedure with the potential risk of esophageal perforation reported in up to 10% of cases. Interestingly, laparoscopic myotomy has some limitations which depend on the laparoscopic technique (bidimensional vision, poor range of movement) and on the surgeon’s experience. Recently, the use of the robotic technology has been proposed claiming that it might reduce intraoperative esophageal perforation rates and improve postoperative quality of life after Heller myotomy, mainly due to the 3D view and enhanced dexterity of the surgeon. Despite significant improvements in surgical treatment, the length of myotomy is still a matter of debate to date. Substantially, although some authors proposed a limited myotomy on the lower esophagus preserving a small portion of the LES to prevent postoperative reflux, most authors recommended a myotomy extending 4 to 6cm on the esophagus and 1 to 2cm on the gastric side. In this video, we performed a 6cm long esophagogastric myotomy, with a 2.5cm proximal extension above the Z-line (endoscopically recognized) and a 3.5cm distal extension below the same landmark. In a previous experimental study with intraoperative computerized manometry, we observed that myotomy of the esophageal portion of the LES (without dissection of the gastric fibers) did not lead to any significant variation in sphincteric pressure. Instead, the dissection of the gastric fibers for at least 2 to 2.5cm on the anterior gastric wall created a significant modification of the LES pressure profile. This may be due to the interruption of the anterior portion of gastric semicircular clasp and sling fibers, with consequent loss of their hook properties on the LES pressure profile.
Robotic abdominoperineal resection (APR) with intraperitoneal puborectalis incision
The da Vinci™ surgical robotic system with its increased instrument stability, tridimensional view, and dexterity with 7 degrees of wristed motion offers a distinct surgical advantage over traditional laparoscopic instruments. This advantage is mainly in the deep pelvis where the limited working space and visibility makes distal rectal dissection extremely challenging. Additionally, the complete control of the surgeon over the stable surgical platform allows fine and accurate dissection in this area.

An abdominoperineal resection (APR) involves the excision of the rectum with a total mesorectal excision (TME), and excision of the anus with an adequate circumferential resection margin (CRM). In a conventional open or laparoscopic approach, the rectal dissection is performed down to the level of the pelvic floor, after which the perineal approach is used to excise the anus and to cut the pelvic floor muscles circumferentially to allow for ‘en bloc’ tumor removal. However, as the pelvic floor is frequently very deep from the skin surface, dissection is technically challenging due to poor visualization, often leading to blind dissection. As a result, many APR specimens suffer from the problem of “waisting” and a positive CRM at the level of the levator ani muscle. In order to solve this problem, some units practice extralevator APR – however, in those cases, the patient ends up with a large perineal defect which frequently needs to be closed with either mesh or flap reconstruction.
With the da Vinci™ robotic system, this problem can potentially be minimized. The robotic system can be used to access deep into the pelvic cavity and make an incision in the puborectalis sling down to the ischiorectal fat. This incision, once completed, allows for easy access from the perineal approach to enter the pelvic cavity and complete the dissection, preventing any blind dissection and facilitating a CRM-clear specimen to be excised.
This video features a totally robotic approach to an abdominoperineal resection for a poorly differentiated anorectal adenocarcinoma, with intraperitoneal incision of the puborectalis sling to facilitate subsequent perineal dissection and specimen extraction.

Clinical case
A 79-year-old female patient presented with a perianal lump and discomfort. Colonoscopy revealed a 2cm mobile adenomatous polypoid lesion at the anorectal junction. Excision biopsy showed a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma.

CT-scan of the thorax, abdomen and pelvis did not show any distant metastases, and MRI of the rectum did not show any significant locoregional disease. A robotic abdominoperineal resection was performed.

Patient set-up
The da Vinci™ Si™ robotic system was used, and a dual docking approach was chosen.
The patient was placed in a Lloyd-Davies position. Robotic ports (8mm) were placed in the epigastrium, left flank, suprapubic region, and in the right iliac fossa respectively. A 12mm trocar is inserted into the right flank for assistance and stapling.
SAE Yeo
Surgical intervention
6 months ago
326 views
1 like
0 comments
11:27
Robotic abdominoperineal resection (APR) with intraperitoneal puborectalis incision
The da Vinci™ surgical robotic system with its increased instrument stability, tridimensional view, and dexterity with 7 degrees of wristed motion offers a distinct surgical advantage over traditional laparoscopic instruments. This advantage is mainly in the deep pelvis where the limited working space and visibility makes distal rectal dissection extremely challenging. Additionally, the complete control of the surgeon over the stable surgical platform allows fine and accurate dissection in this area.

An abdominoperineal resection (APR) involves the excision of the rectum with a total mesorectal excision (TME), and excision of the anus with an adequate circumferential resection margin (CRM). In a conventional open or laparoscopic approach, the rectal dissection is performed down to the level of the pelvic floor, after which the perineal approach is used to excise the anus and to cut the pelvic floor muscles circumferentially to allow for ‘en bloc’ tumor removal. However, as the pelvic floor is frequently very deep from the skin surface, dissection is technically challenging due to poor visualization, often leading to blind dissection. As a result, many APR specimens suffer from the problem of “waisting” and a positive CRM at the level of the levator ani muscle. In order to solve this problem, some units practice extralevator APR – however, in those cases, the patient ends up with a large perineal defect which frequently needs to be closed with either mesh or flap reconstruction.
With the da Vinci™ robotic system, this problem can potentially be minimized. The robotic system can be used to access deep into the pelvic cavity and make an incision in the puborectalis sling down to the ischiorectal fat. This incision, once completed, allows for easy access from the perineal approach to enter the pelvic cavity and complete the dissection, preventing any blind dissection and facilitating a CRM-clear specimen to be excised.
This video features a totally robotic approach to an abdominoperineal resection for a poorly differentiated anorectal adenocarcinoma, with intraperitoneal incision of the puborectalis sling to facilitate subsequent perineal dissection and specimen extraction.

Clinical case
A 79-year-old female patient presented with a perianal lump and discomfort. Colonoscopy revealed a 2cm mobile adenomatous polypoid lesion at the anorectal junction. Excision biopsy showed a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma.

CT-scan of the thorax, abdomen and pelvis did not show any distant metastases, and MRI of the rectum did not show any significant locoregional disease. A robotic abdominoperineal resection was performed.

Patient set-up
The da Vinci™ Si™ robotic system was used, and a dual docking approach was chosen.
The patient was placed in a Lloyd-Davies position. Robotic ports (8mm) were placed in the epigastrium, left flank, suprapubic region, and in the right iliac fossa respectively. A 12mm trocar is inserted into the right flank for assistance and stapling.
Robotic left lateral sectionectomy in cirrhotic liver
Background: Laparoscopy for cirrhotic patients can reduce intraoperative bleeding and postoperative morbidity when compared to open surgery. Liver robotic surgery remains a work in progress and only few series reported this approach for cirrhotic patients.
Methods: This is the case of a 62-year-old man with hepatitis C virus and alcoholic cirrhosis (MELD score 10, Child-Pugh score A6) with a single lesion in liver segment III and close to its pedicle.
Results: Intraoperative ultrasound was used to confirm findings on preoperative imaging.
Parenchymal transection was made with an ultrasonic scalpel, monopolar and bipolar cautery with no Pringle’s maneuver. Linear staplers were used to control left lobe inflow and outflow. The specimen was removed through a Pfannenstiel incision. The estimated blood loss was 100mL, and the postoperative course was uneventful. Pathological findings confirmed a 2.5cm hepatocellular carcinoma, with negative margins, and a cirrhotic parenchyma.
Conclusion: Robotic left lateral sectionectomy seems to be as feasible as the conventional laparoscopic approach in selected cirrhotic patients.
R Araujo, LA de Castro, F Felippe, D Burgardt, D Wohnrath
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1458 views
165 likes
0 comments
07:47
Robotic left lateral sectionectomy in cirrhotic liver
Background: Laparoscopy for cirrhotic patients can reduce intraoperative bleeding and postoperative morbidity when compared to open surgery. Liver robotic surgery remains a work in progress and only few series reported this approach for cirrhotic patients.
Methods: This is the case of a 62-year-old man with hepatitis C virus and alcoholic cirrhosis (MELD score 10, Child-Pugh score A6) with a single lesion in liver segment III and close to its pedicle.
Results: Intraoperative ultrasound was used to confirm findings on preoperative imaging.
Parenchymal transection was made with an ultrasonic scalpel, monopolar and bipolar cautery with no Pringle’s maneuver. Linear staplers were used to control left lobe inflow and outflow. The specimen was removed through a Pfannenstiel incision. The estimated blood loss was 100mL, and the postoperative course was uneventful. Pathological findings confirmed a 2.5cm hepatocellular carcinoma, with negative margins, and a cirrhotic parenchyma.
Conclusion: Robotic left lateral sectionectomy seems to be as feasible as the conventional laparoscopic approach in selected cirrhotic patients.
Robotic pancreaticoduodenectomy for vaterian ampulloma
We report the case of a robot-assisted pancreaticoduodenectomy for vaterian ampulloma. The patient is positioned in the French position with the assistant between the legs and the robot at the head. Five trocars are used: the camera is introduced through the umbilical trocar. The operation begins with the exploration of the peritoneum and of the liver. The gastric antrum is divided. Each structure of the hepatic pedicle is skeletonized. The superior border of the pancreas is dissected, hence allowing to approach the mesentericoportal axis.
The surgeon proceeds to the inferior border of the pancreas in order to find the mesentericoportal axis and to achieve a retropancreatic passage, which is where the pancreas will be divided. The pancreas is divided using the Sonicision™ cordless ultrasonic dissection device. The first jejunal loop is divided with a stapler. The specimen is totally mobilized ‘en bloc’, and freed from the portal vascular axis with a dissection of the right border of the coeliac trunk. At the end of the dissection, the different arterial and venous structures are skeletonized with a lymph node resection. The reconstruction is performed with a pancreaticogastrostomy, hepaticojejunostomy, and gastrojejunostomy.
P Pessaux, R Memeo, V De Blasi, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
2077 views
233 likes
0 comments
28:02
Robotic pancreaticoduodenectomy for vaterian ampulloma
We report the case of a robot-assisted pancreaticoduodenectomy for vaterian ampulloma. The patient is positioned in the French position with the assistant between the legs and the robot at the head. Five trocars are used: the camera is introduced through the umbilical trocar. The operation begins with the exploration of the peritoneum and of the liver. The gastric antrum is divided. Each structure of the hepatic pedicle is skeletonized. The superior border of the pancreas is dissected, hence allowing to approach the mesentericoportal axis.
The surgeon proceeds to the inferior border of the pancreas in order to find the mesentericoportal axis and to achieve a retropancreatic passage, which is where the pancreas will be divided. The pancreas is divided using the Sonicision™ cordless ultrasonic dissection device. The first jejunal loop is divided with a stapler. The specimen is totally mobilized ‘en bloc’, and freed from the portal vascular axis with a dissection of the right border of the coeliac trunk. At the end of the dissection, the different arterial and venous structures are skeletonized with a lymph node resection. The reconstruction is performed with a pancreaticogastrostomy, hepaticojejunostomy, and gastrojejunostomy.
Is robotic thyroid surgery a real progress?
In this key lecture, Prof. WY Chung briefly describes his experience and his own technique to perform robotic thyroid surgery. He presents advances in surgical indications and compares the main differences of single incision robotic thyroidectomy and LND with novel techniques, e.g. BABA, facelift thyroidectomy, and transoral periosteal thyroidectomy. He demonstrates the advantages and limitations using research data to describe the future of robotic thyroidectomy as a minimally invasive surgery. He highlights new technologies and newly developed robotic systems with current improvements, which focus on haptic feedback, tactile sensation, and single orifice surgery, which will make AI robotic automation surgery possible in the future.
WY Chung
Lecture
1 year ago
351 views
50 likes
0 comments
13:32
Is robotic thyroid surgery a real progress?
In this key lecture, Prof. WY Chung briefly describes his experience and his own technique to perform robotic thyroid surgery. He presents advances in surgical indications and compares the main differences of single incision robotic thyroidectomy and LND with novel techniques, e.g. BABA, facelift thyroidectomy, and transoral periosteal thyroidectomy. He demonstrates the advantages and limitations using research data to describe the future of robotic thyroidectomy as a minimally invasive surgery. He highlights new technologies and newly developed robotic systems with current improvements, which focus on haptic feedback, tactile sensation, and single orifice surgery, which will make AI robotic automation surgery possible in the future.
Mixed robotic laparoscopic synchronous left colectomy and left renal tumor enucleation
A 45-year-old woman with abdominal pain and hematochezia was found with adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon causing incomplete obstruction. CT-scan revealed a 5cm exophytic tumor of the superior pole of the left kidney.
Synchronous Left Colectomy (LC) and Renal Tumor Enucleation (RTE) were scheduled. Robotic surgery was preferred for RTE, but when performed first, splenic flexure mobilization could well interfere with subsequent LC.

Starting with a standard robotic LC would make multiple dockings and patient position changes necessary.
To overcome these problems, we adapted the technique of LC to the lateral position required for RTE and performed robotic vascular ligation of the left colon first. Robotic left colon mobilization and RTE were then performed to finally achieve colectomy and colorectal anastomosis by means of laparoscopy with the patient in a standard lithotomy position.
The procedure required only one docking of the robot and only one change in patient position. A compromise in port site positioning was obtained between the two procedures. One short incision was performed to retrieve both specimens and the same robotic instruments were used for both procedures.
Operative time was 350 minutes. The patient recovered well and no complications were noted. She was discharged on postoperative day 7.
M Lotti, RLJ Naspro, L Rocchini, L Campanati, L Da Pozzo, L Ansaloni
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
1205 views
42 likes
0 comments
16:25
Mixed robotic laparoscopic synchronous left colectomy and left renal tumor enucleation
A 45-year-old woman with abdominal pain and hematochezia was found with adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon causing incomplete obstruction. CT-scan revealed a 5cm exophytic tumor of the superior pole of the left kidney.
Synchronous Left Colectomy (LC) and Renal Tumor Enucleation (RTE) were scheduled. Robotic surgery was preferred for RTE, but when performed first, splenic flexure mobilization could well interfere with subsequent LC.

Starting with a standard robotic LC would make multiple dockings and patient position changes necessary.
To overcome these problems, we adapted the technique of LC to the lateral position required for RTE and performed robotic vascular ligation of the left colon first. Robotic left colon mobilization and RTE were then performed to finally achieve colectomy and colorectal anastomosis by means of laparoscopy with the patient in a standard lithotomy position.
The procedure required only one docking of the robot and only one change in patient position. A compromise in port site positioning was obtained between the two procedures. One short incision was performed to retrieve both specimens and the same robotic instruments were used for both procedures.
Operative time was 350 minutes. The patient recovered well and no complications were noted. She was discharged on postoperative day 7.
Robotic adrenalectomy for left adrenal Conn’s adenoma: live broadcast
According to recent studies, robotic adrenalectomy has proven to be superior to laparoscopic adrenalectomy, with a reduction of blood loss during procedure and a reduced operative time.
The robotic system provides an intraoperative stability to the surgeon, allowing for a perfect handling of sensitive functional adrenal tumors. The main advantage of robotics lies in the ease of dissection, aided by improved visualization, the EndoWrist®, articulated instruments, and reduction of tremors, allowing for more accurate movements.

Indications: hormone-secreting tumors, adrenal masses >5cm, smaller lesions suspicious for malignancy, and lesions increasing in size on serial imaging.
Contraindications: infiltrative adrenal masses and tumors of extremely large size, because the size of adrenal lesions correlates with the potential for adrenal carcinoma.
The da Vinci Robotic Surgical System (Intuitive Surgical Inc., Sunnyvale, CA, USA) and the following robotic instruments are used:30-degree scope, ProGrasp™ forceps, Hot Shears (monopolar curved scissors or a hook), and a Robotic Clip Applier. A monopolar cautery hook and Harmonic ACE® curved shears can also be used when deemed helpful by the surgeon.
Laparoscopic instruments that can be handled by the bedside assistant, a clip applier and a suction device are also used.
CN Tang
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
1732 views
132 likes
0 comments
24:47
Robotic adrenalectomy for left adrenal Conn’s adenoma: live broadcast
According to recent studies, robotic adrenalectomy has proven to be superior to laparoscopic adrenalectomy, with a reduction of blood loss during procedure and a reduced operative time.
The robotic system provides an intraoperative stability to the surgeon, allowing for a perfect handling of sensitive functional adrenal tumors. The main advantage of robotics lies in the ease of dissection, aided by improved visualization, the EndoWrist®, articulated instruments, and reduction of tremors, allowing for more accurate movements.

Indications: hormone-secreting tumors, adrenal masses >5cm, smaller lesions suspicious for malignancy, and lesions increasing in size on serial imaging.
Contraindications: infiltrative adrenal masses and tumors of extremely large size, because the size of adrenal lesions correlates with the potential for adrenal carcinoma.
The da Vinci Robotic Surgical System (Intuitive Surgical Inc., Sunnyvale, CA, USA) and the following robotic instruments are used:30-degree scope, ProGrasp™ forceps, Hot Shears (monopolar curved scissors or a hook), and a Robotic Clip Applier. A monopolar cautery hook and Harmonic ACE® curved shears can also be used when deemed helpful by the surgeon.
Laparoscopic instruments that can be handled by the bedside assistant, a clip applier and a suction device are also used.
Robot-assisted ultrasound-guided transgastric cystogastrostomy
We report the case of a 57-year-old woman with a voluminous pseudocyst in the lesser sac after several episodes of acute pancreatitis of biliary origin managed by a robot-assisted transgastric cystogastrostomy. The patient is lying supine, legs apart. Five ports are positioned. The intervention is begun with an anterior gastrotomy, which allows to introduce a balloon-tipped trocar transgastrically. A second gastrotomy is performed in the prepyloric region. It allows to introduce a second transgastric trocar. Finally, a third gastrotomy is performed at the level of the fundus to introduce a third transgastric balloon-tipped trocar. After transgastric insufflation, the trocars are connected to the robot, which is positioned at the patient’s head. A transgastric ultrasonography is performed to visualize the pseudocyst, which has a heterogeneous content, with fibrotic debris. The gastrotomy is initiated with Ultracision™ at the posterior aspect of the stomach. The cyst is multilocular. The gastric wall is controlled by means of a Doppler ultrasound in order not to pass through the gastric varices, which had been identified on endoscopic ultrasound. A second cavity with some more heterogeneous content is subsequently opened. This cavity presents some pancreatic necrosis. The cystogastrostomy is enlarged at its most. Trocars are then removed to proceed intraperitoneally. The three anterior gastrotomy incisions are then sutured using the robot. The postoperative outcome is uneventful. The patient is discharged on postoperative day 4.
P Pessaux, R Memeo, V De Blasi, O Perotto, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
1078 views
51 likes
0 comments
06:04
Robot-assisted ultrasound-guided transgastric cystogastrostomy
We report the case of a 57-year-old woman with a voluminous pseudocyst in the lesser sac after several episodes of acute pancreatitis of biliary origin managed by a robot-assisted transgastric cystogastrostomy. The patient is lying supine, legs apart. Five ports are positioned. The intervention is begun with an anterior gastrotomy, which allows to introduce a balloon-tipped trocar transgastrically. A second gastrotomy is performed in the prepyloric region. It allows to introduce a second transgastric trocar. Finally, a third gastrotomy is performed at the level of the fundus to introduce a third transgastric balloon-tipped trocar. After transgastric insufflation, the trocars are connected to the robot, which is positioned at the patient’s head. A transgastric ultrasonography is performed to visualize the pseudocyst, which has a heterogeneous content, with fibrotic debris. The gastrotomy is initiated with Ultracision™ at the posterior aspect of the stomach. The cyst is multilocular. The gastric wall is controlled by means of a Doppler ultrasound in order not to pass through the gastric varices, which had been identified on endoscopic ultrasound. A second cavity with some more heterogeneous content is subsequently opened. This cavity presents some pancreatic necrosis. The cystogastrostomy is enlarged at its most. Trocars are then removed to proceed intraperitoneally. The three anterior gastrotomy incisions are then sutured using the robot. The postoperative outcome is uneventful. The patient is discharged on postoperative day 4.
Robotic partial splenectomy for cystic lesion of the spleen
We report the case of a 21-year-old woman with a cystic lesion of the spleen treated with a robotic partial splenectomy. The patient is placed in a right lateral decubitus position. Four ports are introduced into the left hypochondrium. The robot is placed at the level of the patient’s left shoulder. The intervention is begun with a lowering of the splenic flexure. Dissection is initiated at the upper pole of the spleen by retracting the stomach and by progressively dividing the different short vessels. It is decided to start the parenchymotomy approximately 1cm from the devascularized area. Transection is begun using an ultrasonic dissector. Hemostasis is subsequently achieved progressively. Transection is completed by means of a firing of the Endo GIA™ linear stapler. Hemostasis is further completed using the Aquamantys® system and bipolar sealers. The specimen is fully mobilized and placed in a bag. It is extracted by means of a small suprapubic Pfannenstiel’s incision. Pathological findings demonstrate the presence of an epidermoid cyst. The postoperative outcome is uneventful. The patient is discharged on postoperative day 4.
P Pessaux, R Memeo, V De Blasi, N Ferreira, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
1724 views
69 likes
0 comments
09:14
Robotic partial splenectomy for cystic lesion of the spleen
We report the case of a 21-year-old woman with a cystic lesion of the spleen treated with a robotic partial splenectomy. The patient is placed in a right lateral decubitus position. Four ports are introduced into the left hypochondrium. The robot is placed at the level of the patient’s left shoulder. The intervention is begun with a lowering of the splenic flexure. Dissection is initiated at the upper pole of the spleen by retracting the stomach and by progressively dividing the different short vessels. It is decided to start the parenchymotomy approximately 1cm from the devascularized area. Transection is begun using an ultrasonic dissector. Hemostasis is subsequently achieved progressively. Transection is completed by means of a firing of the Endo GIA™ linear stapler. Hemostasis is further completed using the Aquamantys® system and bipolar sealers. The specimen is fully mobilized and placed in a bag. It is extracted by means of a small suprapubic Pfannenstiel’s incision. Pathological findings demonstrate the presence of an epidermoid cyst. The postoperative outcome is uneventful. The patient is discharged on postoperative day 4.
Robotic distal gastrectomy with the EndoWrist® One Vessel Sealer
The EndoWrist® One vessel sealer is a wristed, single-use instrument of the da Vinci surgical robotic system intended for bipolar coagulation and mechanical transection of vessels up to 7mm in diameter and tissue bundles. It could be a potential instrument to overcome the limitation of straight energy-based devices. Although it has the advantage of having an endowrist function which allows easy access to the surgical planes in ideal directions, it requires special caution and know-how to use the device safely and effectively, because of a relatively blunt tip and the absence of an active blade at the tip.
This video of the robotic distal gastrectomy for early gastric cancer shows how to harmonize the use of a sharp instrument with conventional bipolar electricity and of the vessel sealer device to maximize the advantages of such devices and to ensure safety. A conventional bipolar forceps is used to make entrance holes on the tissue for a safe application of the vessel sealer, and to perform fine dissections of small tissues, which are difficult to manage using a vessel sealer. Once the access hole has been made, the vessel sealer is applied in an ideal axis to the avascular tissue plane, thanks to the free wrist function. This technique combined with a sharp instrument using conventional bipolar electricity seems to be helpful for a safe and effective operation, which can use the benefit of the vessel sealer to its full potential, for instance with a high degree of freedom of the movement and secure sealing of lymphovascular structures.
HK Yang, SH Kong
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1308 views
80 likes
0 comments
10:38
Robotic distal gastrectomy with the EndoWrist® One Vessel Sealer
The EndoWrist® One vessel sealer is a wristed, single-use instrument of the da Vinci surgical robotic system intended for bipolar coagulation and mechanical transection of vessels up to 7mm in diameter and tissue bundles. It could be a potential instrument to overcome the limitation of straight energy-based devices. Although it has the advantage of having an endowrist function which allows easy access to the surgical planes in ideal directions, it requires special caution and know-how to use the device safely and effectively, because of a relatively blunt tip and the absence of an active blade at the tip.
This video of the robotic distal gastrectomy for early gastric cancer shows how to harmonize the use of a sharp instrument with conventional bipolar electricity and of the vessel sealer device to maximize the advantages of such devices and to ensure safety. A conventional bipolar forceps is used to make entrance holes on the tissue for a safe application of the vessel sealer, and to perform fine dissections of small tissues, which are difficult to manage using a vessel sealer. Once the access hole has been made, the vessel sealer is applied in an ideal axis to the avascular tissue plane, thanks to the free wrist function. This technique combined with a sharp instrument using conventional bipolar electricity seems to be helpful for a safe and effective operation, which can use the benefit of the vessel sealer to its full potential, for instance with a high degree of freedom of the movement and secure sealing of lymphovascular structures.
Robot-assisted Roux-en-Y gastric bypass after band removal
Patients ask for a new weight loss surgical procedure after gastric band removal due to a lack of efficiency or to complications. Although gastric banding is a reversible procedure, perigastric adhesions located mostly in the upper part of the stomach can make new approaches to this area difficult.
We report the case of a woman who benefited from a gastric banding in 2006. This gastric band was removed in 2010. The patient developed a left subphrenic abscess, which was drained under CT-scan control postoperatively.
Two years after this procedure, the patient wishes to benefit from a new weight loss surgical procedure as she gained 10Kg since her gastric band removal. She has a BMI of 40 and presents with respiratory and rheumatological co-morbidities.
The preoperative work-up was uneventful, and this is particularly true for the esogastroduodenal contrast exam and the gastroscopy.
During the procedure, multiple omental parietal adhesions were found, as well as tight adhesions between the liver, the stomach, and the left crus.
Dissecting the stomach using a conventional approach was made difficult by the presence of these adhesions, and we had to perform an upper pole gastrectomy of the greater curvature in order to clearly identify the gastroesophageal junction’s anatomy. A complete dissection of the left subcardial area is necessary in order to prevent the formation of an excessively large gastric pouch, which could lead to a regain in weight.
This video covers the whole procedure in detail and highlights dissection challenges, which can occur in patients who had their gastric band removed.
The postoperative outcome was uneventful in this woman, with a significant weight loss at one year.
M Vix, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1331 views
46 likes
0 comments
25:55
Robot-assisted Roux-en-Y gastric bypass after band removal
Patients ask for a new weight loss surgical procedure after gastric band removal due to a lack of efficiency or to complications. Although gastric banding is a reversible procedure, perigastric adhesions located mostly in the upper part of the stomach can make new approaches to this area difficult.
We report the case of a woman who benefited from a gastric banding in 2006. This gastric band was removed in 2010. The patient developed a left subphrenic abscess, which was drained under CT-scan control postoperatively.
Two years after this procedure, the patient wishes to benefit from a new weight loss surgical procedure as she gained 10Kg since her gastric band removal. She has a BMI of 40 and presents with respiratory and rheumatological co-morbidities.
The preoperative work-up was uneventful, and this is particularly true for the esogastroduodenal contrast exam and the gastroscopy.
During the procedure, multiple omental parietal adhesions were found, as well as tight adhesions between the liver, the stomach, and the left crus.
Dissecting the stomach using a conventional approach was made difficult by the presence of these adhesions, and we had to perform an upper pole gastrectomy of the greater curvature in order to clearly identify the gastroesophageal junction’s anatomy. A complete dissection of the left subcardial area is necessary in order to prevent the formation of an excessively large gastric pouch, which could lead to a regain in weight.
This video covers the whole procedure in detail and highlights dissection challenges, which can occur in patients who had their gastric band removed.
The postoperative outcome was uneventful in this woman, with a significant weight loss at one year.
Robot-assisted gastric band removal
Adjustable gastric banding (AGB) is one of the surgical treatment modalities for morbid obesity. Over the years, popularity for this treatment increased. It has been by far the most performed bariatric procedure for years in Europe and in the United States. Many gastric band removals are linked to complications and weight loss failure, indicating a new bariatric procedure for some of the patients. Complications after AGB are not uncommon and consist mainly of gastroesophageal reflux disease, pouch dilatation, slippage of the band, and intragastric migration. The failure of the gastric band is multifactorial. Gastric band removal does not preclude a new bariatric procedure (the most common procedure performed in our department is Roux en-Y gastric bypass), which is feasible in the same operative time but the 2-step approach is suitable. The new bariatric procedure offers adequate surgical outcomes and satisfactory results in terms of weight loss.
M Nedelcu, A D'Urso, HA Mercoli, M Vix, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1027 views
36 likes
0 comments
08:14
Robot-assisted gastric band removal
Adjustable gastric banding (AGB) is one of the surgical treatment modalities for morbid obesity. Over the years, popularity for this treatment increased. It has been by far the most performed bariatric procedure for years in Europe and in the United States. Many gastric band removals are linked to complications and weight loss failure, indicating a new bariatric procedure for some of the patients. Complications after AGB are not uncommon and consist mainly of gastroesophageal reflux disease, pouch dilatation, slippage of the band, and intragastric migration. The failure of the gastric band is multifactorial. Gastric band removal does not preclude a new bariatric procedure (the most common procedure performed in our department is Roux en-Y gastric bypass), which is feasible in the same operative time but the 2-step approach is suitable. The new bariatric procedure offers adequate surgical outcomes and satisfactory results in terms of weight loss.
Robot-assisted thoracic resection of an extended esophageal leiomyoma
Objective:
Leiomyomas represent approximately 70% of all benign esophageal tumors. In most cases, patients are asymptomatic, but others can present chest pain, dysphagia or weight loss. Even if malignization is rare, surgery is indicated. Laparoscopy is the most common approach because of the frequency of leiomyoma localization on the lower esophagus. However, thoracoscopy is also commonly performed with some difficulties in case of large tumors.
Our objective is to demonstrate the robotic approach and the bipolar Maryland forceps used for such a specific lesion.

Case presentation:
We present the case of a 58-year-old woman with no particular co-morbidity. On CT-scan, she was incidentally diagnosed with a leiomyoma for Guillain-Barre syndrome. A homogeneous 7cm tumor was found on the left side of the middle esophagus with a horseshoe-shaped aspect typical of leiomyoma. Check-up was completed by MRI and endoscopic ultrasonography, which tended to confirm the diagnosis.
In this video, the robot-assisted thoracic enucleation of the tumor performed by a left approach shows the quality of esophageal exposure and tumor dissection by means of a bipolar Maryland forceps. Blood loss was less than 30mL, and the postoperative period was uneventful. Histological analysis confirmed the diagnosis of leiomyoma.

Conclusion:
Robot-assisted resection of benign esophageal tumors is a safe procedure, especially for intrathoracic tumors. This technique provides a better view and easier dissection. The use of a bipolar Maryland forceps allows for a safer procedure. Day care surgery could then be expected for smaller lesions.
C Peillon, G Philouze, JM Baste
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
586 views
14 likes
0 comments
09:09
Robot-assisted thoracic resection of an extended esophageal leiomyoma
Objective:
Leiomyomas represent approximately 70% of all benign esophageal tumors. In most cases, patients are asymptomatic, but others can present chest pain, dysphagia or weight loss. Even if malignization is rare, surgery is indicated. Laparoscopy is the most common approach because of the frequency of leiomyoma localization on the lower esophagus. However, thoracoscopy is also commonly performed with some difficulties in case of large tumors.
Our objective is to demonstrate the robotic approach and the bipolar Maryland forceps used for such a specific lesion.

Case presentation:
We present the case of a 58-year-old woman with no particular co-morbidity. On CT-scan, she was incidentally diagnosed with a leiomyoma for Guillain-Barre syndrome. A homogeneous 7cm tumor was found on the left side of the middle esophagus with a horseshoe-shaped aspect typical of leiomyoma. Check-up was completed by MRI and endoscopic ultrasonography, which tended to confirm the diagnosis.
In this video, the robot-assisted thoracic enucleation of the tumor performed by a left approach shows the quality of esophageal exposure and tumor dissection by means of a bipolar Maryland forceps. Blood loss was less than 30mL, and the postoperative period was uneventful. Histological analysis confirmed the diagnosis of leiomyoma.

Conclusion:
Robot-assisted resection of benign esophageal tumors is a safe procedure, especially for intrathoracic tumors. This technique provides a better view and easier dissection. The use of a bipolar Maryland forceps allows for a safer procedure. Day care surgery could then be expected for smaller lesions.
Robotic assisted resection of a complex thymoma
Our objective is to demonstrate the management of a very complex mediastinal tumor. To do so, a minimally invasive resection is used, highlighting the benefit of a robotic approach.
The present case is that of a 64-year-old patient diagnosed with an anterior mediastinal mass discovered during myasthenia assessment with positive antibodies.
The tumor was in contact with the aorta, pulmonary artery, and the innominate vein with probable pericardial invasion.
Given such a complex localization, the challenge was to propose a radical resection using minimally invasive surgery with robotic assistance.
As compared to a VATS approach, a robotic approach provides a better view and instruments to achieve complete resection in complex mediastinal tumor. What is important to first control on the CT-scan is the size of the tumor as compared to the thoracic cavity’s size which will allow robotic surgery with a good operative field.
Pericardial resection associated with a lateral plasty of the innominate vein were required to achieved complete R0 resection. The entire resection was performed using a bipolar forceps.
The postoperative course was uneventful. The patient is discharged on postopeartive day 3. The phrenic nerve was preserved.
Pathological analysis of the operative specimen is evocative of a B1 thymoma classified IIb on the Masaoka staging system with complete R0 resection (margins were clear).
The entire file was discussed at the Rhythmic meeting, which is the national meeting for thymoma tumor management held every two weeks. A simple survey was put forward without any adjuvant radiotherapy.
JM Baste, E Roussel, L Haddad, C Peillon
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1142 views
26 likes
0 comments
07:19
Robotic assisted resection of a complex thymoma
Our objective is to demonstrate the management of a very complex mediastinal tumor. To do so, a minimally invasive resection is used, highlighting the benefit of a robotic approach.
The present case is that of a 64-year-old patient diagnosed with an anterior mediastinal mass discovered during myasthenia assessment with positive antibodies.
The tumor was in contact with the aorta, pulmonary artery, and the innominate vein with probable pericardial invasion.
Given such a complex localization, the challenge was to propose a radical resection using minimally invasive surgery with robotic assistance.
As compared to a VATS approach, a robotic approach provides a better view and instruments to achieve complete resection in complex mediastinal tumor. What is important to first control on the CT-scan is the size of the tumor as compared to the thoracic cavity’s size which will allow robotic surgery with a good operative field.
Pericardial resection associated with a lateral plasty of the innominate vein were required to achieved complete R0 resection. The entire resection was performed using a bipolar forceps.
The postoperative course was uneventful. The patient is discharged on postopeartive day 3. The phrenic nerve was preserved.
Pathological analysis of the operative specimen is evocative of a B1 thymoma classified IIb on the Masaoka staging system with complete R0 resection (margins were clear).
The entire file was discussed at the Rhythmic meeting, which is the national meeting for thymoma tumor management held every two weeks. A simple survey was put forward without any adjuvant radiotherapy.
Robot-assisted thoracoscopic right superior lobectomy with conversion for controlled bleeding: a complex case
As the technique and the indications of robotic video-assisted lung resections have evolved, surgeons have had to face numerous pitfalls. One in particular is the vascular tear, which urge the operator to convert to thoracotomy. The decision as to when and how to convert to thoracotomy is always difficult to make. This video illustrates a complex case of robotic right upper lobectomy which required thoracotomy for controlled bleeding.
This is the case of a 47-year-old woman with a past medical history of severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, active smoking, alcoholic liver cirrhosis, but no history of tuberculosis. She presented with a 3-month history of a right upper lobar mass detected on chest X-ray which evolved despite antibiotic treatment. Work-up including a PET-scan evoked a suspicion of malignancy.

While finishing the lobectomy, we had to face a difficult dissection of the posterior part of the oblique fissure with a tricky control of the dorsal artery. Trying to open the fissure with the endostapler, we tore the arterial branch and applied an immediate control by means of a double Cadiere grasper. When bleeding was finally controlled, we decided to convert for safety reasons. We proceeded without undocking the last robotic arm, clamping the artery until control was achieved using thoracotomy instruments. It allowed us to manage this situation with no rush and stress.
There are two types of bleeding: controlled and uncontrolled. In our experience of RATS lobectomy and by reviewing our complications, we feel that there are several advantages to this technique: first, small instruments make small injuries which can be controlled by robotic instrument. Secondly, passive locking of the robotic arm provides sufficient time for the surgical team to prepare conversion.
JM Baste, N Bayard, C Peillon
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
948 views
35 likes
0 comments
08:59
Robot-assisted thoracoscopic right superior lobectomy with conversion for controlled bleeding: a complex case
As the technique and the indications of robotic video-assisted lung resections have evolved, surgeons have had to face numerous pitfalls. One in particular is the vascular tear, which urge the operator to convert to thoracotomy. The decision as to when and how to convert to thoracotomy is always difficult to make. This video illustrates a complex case of robotic right upper lobectomy which required thoracotomy for controlled bleeding.
This is the case of a 47-year-old woman with a past medical history of severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, active smoking, alcoholic liver cirrhosis, but no history of tuberculosis. She presented with a 3-month history of a right upper lobar mass detected on chest X-ray which evolved despite antibiotic treatment. Work-up including a PET-scan evoked a suspicion of malignancy.

While finishing the lobectomy, we had to face a difficult dissection of the posterior part of the oblique fissure with a tricky control of the dorsal artery. Trying to open the fissure with the endostapler, we tore the arterial branch and applied an immediate control by means of a double Cadiere grasper. When bleeding was finally controlled, we decided to convert for safety reasons. We proceeded without undocking the last robotic arm, clamping the artery until control was achieved using thoracotomy instruments. It allowed us to manage this situation with no rush and stress.
There are two types of bleeding: controlled and uncontrolled. In our experience of RATS lobectomy and by reviewing our complications, we feel that there are several advantages to this technique: first, small instruments make small injuries which can be controlled by robotic instrument. Secondly, passive locking of the robotic arm provides sufficient time for the surgical team to prepare conversion.
Complex left upper lobectomy with lymphadenectomy by robotic assisted thoracoscopy (CPRL-3) for cT2N2 non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC)
This video demonstrates a left upper lobectomy for the management of a proximal cT2N2M0 lung tumor. It is usually considered a contraindication of minimally invasive surgery. Our aim is to show the feasibility and the safety of the procedure. Robotic surgery will allow for more minimally invasive indications.
The tumor lies proximally to the left trunk of the pulmonary artery which could be a contraindication to a minimally invasive surgery. A CT-scan combined with a 3D reconstruction helps to rule out the existence of pulmonary artery invasion. Hilar adenopathies as well as adenopathies of the aortopulmonary window present a hypermetabolism on PET-scan. No neoadjuvant chemotherapy is performed since a R0 surgery is potentially feasible immediately and can be associated with a full lymphadenectomy.
This video presents our technique of robotically assisted left upper lobectomy combined with a lymph node dissection. We have attempted to standardize our lung resection technique using 6 areas of dissection to gain in efficacy and save time. The first operative step is to free the triangular ligament and to sample potential lymph nodes (station No. 9). A hilar lymphadenectomy (lymph node station No. 10) is then performed using a posterior approach first followed by a subcarinal approach (lymph node #7, by skeletonizing the pulmonary artery and the left main bronchus. The third step of the procedure is to dissect the fissure to skeletonize the pulmonary artery and its lingular branches as well as branches of the posterior fissure, dissection of lymph node stations No. 11 is performed simultaneously. The elements of the hilum are then approached using an anterior approach. The superior pulmonary vein is dissected. The roof of the hilum is then freed. The left upper bronchus is divided last. Dissection of lymph node station No. 5 completes the procedure with preservation of the left recurrent nerve
Abbreviation:
CPRL-3: complete portal robotic lobectomy using 3 arms
J Cahais, JM Baste, C Peillon
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
707 views
18 likes
0 comments
11:07
Complex left upper lobectomy with lymphadenectomy by robotic assisted thoracoscopy (CPRL-3) for cT2N2 non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC)
This video demonstrates a left upper lobectomy for the management of a proximal cT2N2M0 lung tumor. It is usually considered a contraindication of minimally invasive surgery. Our aim is to show the feasibility and the safety of the procedure. Robotic surgery will allow for more minimally invasive indications.
The tumor lies proximally to the left trunk of the pulmonary artery which could be a contraindication to a minimally invasive surgery. A CT-scan combined with a 3D reconstruction helps to rule out the existence of pulmonary artery invasion. Hilar adenopathies as well as adenopathies of the aortopulmonary window present a hypermetabolism on PET-scan. No neoadjuvant chemotherapy is performed since a R0 surgery is potentially feasible immediately and can be associated with a full lymphadenectomy.
This video presents our technique of robotically assisted left upper lobectomy combined with a lymph node dissection. We have attempted to standardize our lung resection technique using 6 areas of dissection to gain in efficacy and save time. The first operative step is to free the triangular ligament and to sample potential lymph nodes (station No. 9). A hilar lymphadenectomy (lymph node station No. 10) is then performed using a posterior approach first followed by a subcarinal approach (lymph node #7, by skeletonizing the pulmonary artery and the left main bronchus. The third step of the procedure is to dissect the fissure to skeletonize the pulmonary artery and its lingular branches as well as branches of the posterior fissure, dissection of lymph node stations No. 11 is performed simultaneously. The elements of the hilum are then approached using an anterior approach. The superior pulmonary vein is dissected. The roof of the hilum is then freed. The left upper bronchus is divided last. Dissection of lymph node station No. 5 completes the procedure with preservation of the left recurrent nerve
Abbreviation:
CPRL-3: complete portal robotic lobectomy using 3 arms
Robot-assisted distal gastrectomy and D2 lymphadenectomy for early gastric cancer
We present the case of an early gastric cancer, which was located in the lower third of the stomach. The patient underwent a robot-assisted distal gastrectomy with D2 lymph node dissection. The da Vinci™ robotic system may provide some benefit to the operator in D2 dissection thanks to the articulating function of the arms, but the advantage for the patient has not been validated. The procedure was similar to a laparoscopic distal gastrectomy, starting from the omentectomy in the left side first and then the right side, followed by a lymphadenectomy around the infrapyloric and suprapyloric area. The lymphadenectomy is continued towards the suprapyloric area along the common hepatic artery and splenic artery, and the left gastric vein and artery are ligated. With a dissection of the lesser curvature aspect of the upper stomach, D2 dissection is completed “en bloc”.
HK Yang
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
1753 views
77 likes
0 comments
29:24
Robot-assisted distal gastrectomy and D2 lymphadenectomy for early gastric cancer
We present the case of an early gastric cancer, which was located in the lower third of the stomach. The patient underwent a robot-assisted distal gastrectomy with D2 lymph node dissection. The da Vinci™ robotic system may provide some benefit to the operator in D2 dissection thanks to the articulating function of the arms, but the advantage for the patient has not been validated. The procedure was similar to a laparoscopic distal gastrectomy, starting from the omentectomy in the left side first and then the right side, followed by a lymphadenectomy around the infrapyloric and suprapyloric area. The lymphadenectomy is continued towards the suprapyloric area along the common hepatic artery and splenic artery, and the left gastric vein and artery are ligated. With a dissection of the lesser curvature aspect of the upper stomach, D2 dissection is completed “en bloc”.
Robotic left adrenalectomy for Conn's syndrome
Introduction: Since the first robotic adrenalectomy by Piazza et al. in 1999, using both the ZEUS and AESOP systems, numerous series and case reports have been published describing both left and right adrenalectomies using both transperitoneal and retroperitoneal approaches. These studies demonstrate that the robotic approach is feasible and safe.
Methods: This is the case of a 43-year-old female patient who presented with weakness, muscular cramps and systemic arterial hypertension. Her blood tests revealed a high Na++, low K+, very low renin (inhibited) and high aldosterone dose levels. A CT-scan showed a unique adenoma within 2.6cm at the left adrenal gland. She was diagnosed with Conn’s syndrome.
Results: In this video showing a robotic left adrenalectomy, the patient was placed in a left lateral decubitus, jack-knife position. Four robotic arms were used. Dissection was performed by means of scissors and of a bipolar fenestrated forceps. Operative time took 95 minutes. No measurable bleeding was observed. No UCI stay was necessary and the patient was discharged 24 hours after the intervention.
Conclusion: In this case, adrenal surgery was performed using a robotic approach, which demonstrated that the procedure was feasible, safe, with a low morbidity and a short hospital stay.
Fe Madureira, Fa Madureira, E Parra-Davila, D Madureira
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
1616 views
63 likes
0 comments
08:20
Robotic left adrenalectomy for Conn's syndrome
Introduction: Since the first robotic adrenalectomy by Piazza et al. in 1999, using both the ZEUS and AESOP systems, numerous series and case reports have been published describing both left and right adrenalectomies using both transperitoneal and retroperitoneal approaches. These studies demonstrate that the robotic approach is feasible and safe.
Methods: This is the case of a 43-year-old female patient who presented with weakness, muscular cramps and systemic arterial hypertension. Her blood tests revealed a high Na++, low K+, very low renin (inhibited) and high aldosterone dose levels. A CT-scan showed a unique adenoma within 2.6cm at the left adrenal gland. She was diagnosed with Conn’s syndrome.
Results: In this video showing a robotic left adrenalectomy, the patient was placed in a left lateral decubitus, jack-knife position. Four robotic arms were used. Dissection was performed by means of scissors and of a bipolar fenestrated forceps. Operative time took 95 minutes. No measurable bleeding was observed. No UCI stay was necessary and the patient was discharged 24 hours after the intervention.
Conclusion: In this case, adrenal surgery was performed using a robotic approach, which demonstrated that the procedure was feasible, safe, with a low morbidity and a short hospital stay.
Robotic single site left dismembered pyeloplasty for ureteropelvic junction obstruction
This video demonstrates the surgical steps for a left ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) reconstruction performed by means of the new da Vinci® robotic single site platform.
This surgery can be achieved by a 2cm single incision made in the umbilicus.
The system provides 2 robotic instruments crossing into the trocar in order to have an adequate triangulation. In this set-up, the left robotic instrument is placed into the surgical field on the right side while the right robotic instrument is on the left side of the surgical field. The software of the da Vinci™ system allows for the control of the right robotic arm to the left master into the robotic console in order to have the instrument placed in the right part of the surgical field controlled by the right master. This allows for a direct and natural control of the instruments, hence solving the problem of the crossing of the instruments.
This is a great advantage when compared to standard laparoscopic single site surgery.
F Annino, T Verdacchi, M de Angelis
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
2105 views
49 likes
1 comment
05:40
Robotic single site left dismembered pyeloplasty for ureteropelvic junction obstruction
This video demonstrates the surgical steps for a left ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) reconstruction performed by means of the new da Vinci® robotic single site platform.
This surgery can be achieved by a 2cm single incision made in the umbilicus.
The system provides 2 robotic instruments crossing into the trocar in order to have an adequate triangulation. In this set-up, the left robotic instrument is placed into the surgical field on the right side while the right robotic instrument is on the left side of the surgical field. The software of the da Vinci™ system allows for the control of the right robotic arm to the left master into the robotic console in order to have the instrument placed in the right part of the surgical field controlled by the right master. This allows for a direct and natural control of the instruments, hence solving the problem of the crossing of the instruments.
This is a great advantage when compared to standard laparoscopic single site surgery.
Robot-assisted gastric band removal: any limitations?
Nowadays, indications for gastric band removal are well-standardized. In case of esophageal or gastric dilatation, migration or any injury related to the LAP-BAND® access port or tubing, the band and its access port should be removed. In rare specific cases, part of the LAP-BAND® system (either access port or band) may be preserved.
Before proceeding to the surgical band removal, a complete preoperative radiological and endoscopic work-up should be performed.
Here, we present the case of a 62-year-old woman who benefited from gastric band placement 10 years earlier. The band proved effective. However, for several weeks, she has been suffering from abdominal pain associated with vomiting and hematemesis.
After a work-up which included CT-scanning, water-soluble contrast swallow and gastroscopy, it was decided to remove the band.
L Marx, M Vix, A D'Urso, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
743 views
10 likes
0 comments
08:36
Robot-assisted gastric band removal: any limitations?
Nowadays, indications for gastric band removal are well-standardized. In case of esophageal or gastric dilatation, migration or any injury related to the LAP-BAND® access port or tubing, the band and its access port should be removed. In rare specific cases, part of the LAP-BAND® system (either access port or band) may be preserved.
Before proceeding to the surgical band removal, a complete preoperative radiological and endoscopic work-up should be performed.
Here, we present the case of a 62-year-old woman who benefited from gastric band placement 10 years earlier. The band proved effective. However, for several weeks, she has been suffering from abdominal pain associated with vomiting and hematemesis.
After a work-up which included CT-scanning, water-soluble contrast swallow and gastroscopy, it was decided to remove the band.
Robot-assisted left video thoracoscopic partial thymectomy for mediastinal ectopic parathyroid adenoma
This film presents the case of an 85-year-old man who suffered from primary hyperparathyroidism diagnosed on a pathological cervical fracture and elevated laboratory values for parathyroid hormone and calcium. Preoperative localizing studies showed no anomalies on the parathyroid gland. However, a left anterior mediastinal ectopic parathyroid adenoma was found on 99m Tc-MIBI scintigraphy.
Mediastinal parathyroid adenomas can be resected in a minimally invasive fashion via a conventional transcervical approach, or using a video-assisted thoracoscopic resection, allowing for an access to the lower cervical area without the use of a cervicotomy. Robotic-assisted thoracic surgery (RATS) also allows for a better visualization and less instrument crowding, with no difference in clinical results.
Considering the good efficacy and the better chances not to leave tumor tissue missed out during surgery, and the impossibility to install the patient with cervical hyperextension, we decided to perform a robot-assisted thoracoscopy through a left-sided approach, instead of the conventional transcervical approach.
During the intraoperative period, the adenoma was identified, and we did not feel the need to perform PTH assay. There were no complications in the postoperative period. PTH levels reached a normal range after adenoma removal, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 3. He remains asymptomatic at 3 months after the intervention.
The robotic resection of an intrathymic parathyroid adenoma is a safe and effective alternative to the conventional transcervical approach.
JM Baste, M Dazza, C Peillon
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
1026 views
29 likes
0 comments
06:54
Robot-assisted left video thoracoscopic partial thymectomy for mediastinal ectopic parathyroid adenoma
This film presents the case of an 85-year-old man who suffered from primary hyperparathyroidism diagnosed on a pathological cervical fracture and elevated laboratory values for parathyroid hormone and calcium. Preoperative localizing studies showed no anomalies on the parathyroid gland. However, a left anterior mediastinal ectopic parathyroid adenoma was found on 99m Tc-MIBI scintigraphy.
Mediastinal parathyroid adenomas can be resected in a minimally invasive fashion via a conventional transcervical approach, or using a video-assisted thoracoscopic resection, allowing for an access to the lower cervical area without the use of a cervicotomy. Robotic-assisted thoracic surgery (RATS) also allows for a better visualization and less instrument crowding, with no difference in clinical results.
Considering the good efficacy and the better chances not to leave tumor tissue missed out during surgery, and the impossibility to install the patient with cervical hyperextension, we decided to perform a robot-assisted thoracoscopy through a left-sided approach, instead of the conventional transcervical approach.
During the intraoperative period, the adenoma was identified, and we did not feel the need to perform PTH assay. There were no complications in the postoperative period. PTH levels reached a normal range after adenoma removal, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 3. He remains asymptomatic at 3 months after the intervention.
The robotic resection of an intrathymic parathyroid adenoma is a safe and effective alternative to the conventional transcervical approach.
Full endoscopic robot-assisted basal segmentectomy for bronchiectasis
Objective
Surgical treatment of bronchiectasis is often proposed in complicated situations [1]. The development of minimally invasive surgery should allow us to propose a surgical curative treatment with preventative purposes. In this video, we describe a lung-sparing surgery using a full endoscopic robotic segmentectomy as described by Dylewsky [2] to deal with localized bronchiectasis.
Case presentation
This is the case of a 40-year-old man with bronchiectasis, colonized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa with antibiotic resistance. The patient suffered from recurrent infections. Bronchiectasis is localized in the left basal segments on CT-scan. Basal segmentectomy was decided upon using a robot-assisted procedure. This kind of patient is usually treated medically with iterative antibiotherapy until a new complication occurs.
Results
There was no postoperative complication and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 4. The patient resumed work after one month without any complaint.
Conclusion
When using a precise resection, basal segmentectomy seems to be feasible using a robot-assisted procedure, without increasing perioperative morbidity. This procedure should be proposed as a preventative surgery as it is a relatively new approach for benign or infectious lung disease.
Bibliographic references
1. Agasthian T. Results of surgery for bronchiectasis and pulmonary abscesses. Thorac Surg Clin. 2012;22:333-44.
2. Dylewski MR, Ohaeto AC, Pereira JF. Pulmonary resection using a total endoscopic robotic video-assisted approach. Semin Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2011;23:36-42.
JM Baste, P Rinieri, A Sebestyen
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
276 views
4 likes
0 comments
07:42
Full endoscopic robot-assisted basal segmentectomy for bronchiectasis
Objective
Surgical treatment of bronchiectasis is often proposed in complicated situations [1]. The development of minimally invasive surgery should allow us to propose a surgical curative treatment with preventative purposes. In this video, we describe a lung-sparing surgery using a full endoscopic robotic segmentectomy as described by Dylewsky [2] to deal with localized bronchiectasis.
Case presentation
This is the case of a 40-year-old man with bronchiectasis, colonized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa with antibiotic resistance. The patient suffered from recurrent infections. Bronchiectasis is localized in the left basal segments on CT-scan. Basal segmentectomy was decided upon using a robot-assisted procedure. This kind of patient is usually treated medically with iterative antibiotherapy until a new complication occurs.
Results
There was no postoperative complication and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 4. The patient resumed work after one month without any complaint.
Conclusion
When using a precise resection, basal segmentectomy seems to be feasible using a robot-assisted procedure, without increasing perioperative morbidity. This procedure should be proposed as a preventative surgery as it is a relatively new approach for benign or infectious lung disease.
Bibliographic references
1. Agasthian T. Results of surgery for bronchiectasis and pulmonary abscesses. Thorac Surg Clin. 2012;22:333-44.
2. Dylewski MR, Ohaeto AC, Pereira JF. Pulmonary resection using a total endoscopic robotic video-assisted approach. Semin Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2011;23:36-42.
Robot-assisted mini gastric bypass in a patient with a huge liver
This video demonstrates our mini gastric bypass technique using the da Vinci™ robotic surgical system. This intervention may be suggested in all morbidly obese patients without any major gastroesophageal reflux. One of the interests of this film lies in that the patient has a huge liver requiring delicate dissection and division of the superior gastric pouch. The biliary loop typically measures 200cm, and we systematically close Petersen’s defect in order to prevent internal hernias. The use of the surgical robot allows to perform an easier hand-assisted gastrojejunostomy. None of the preparatory maneuvers rely on the surgical robot as it is currently not equipped with mechanical staplers.
M Vix, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
2072 views
10 likes
0 comments
15:19
Robot-assisted mini gastric bypass in a patient with a huge liver
This video demonstrates our mini gastric bypass technique using the da Vinci™ robotic surgical system. This intervention may be suggested in all morbidly obese patients without any major gastroesophageal reflux. One of the interests of this film lies in that the patient has a huge liver requiring delicate dissection and division of the superior gastric pouch. The biliary loop typically measures 200cm, and we systematically close Petersen’s defect in order to prevent internal hernias. The use of the surgical robot allows to perform an easier hand-assisted gastrojejunostomy. None of the preparatory maneuvers rely on the surgical robot as it is currently not equipped with mechanical staplers.
Robot-assisted revision of stenotic gastrojejunostomy after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass
This video presents the case of a 37-year-old woman who benefited from a laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass with circular gastrojejunal anastomosis one year ago. An anastomotic stenosis rapidly occurred. It was managed conventionally by several endoscopic balloon dilatations without any stable results. It was found legitimate to offer the patient a revision of the gastrojejunostomy. Prior to performing the reintervention, a nasojejunal tube was placed in order to improve the patient’s enteral nutrition. Surgery consisted in the resection of the existing gastrojejunostomy and in the tailoring of a new manual anastomosis using the da Vinci™ robotic Surgical System. The postoperative outcome was uneventful. The patient no longer reports any dysphagia 3 months postoperatively.
M Vix, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
1144 views
9 likes
0 comments
15:12
Robot-assisted revision of stenotic gastrojejunostomy after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass
This video presents the case of a 37-year-old woman who benefited from a laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass with circular gastrojejunal anastomosis one year ago. An anastomotic stenosis rapidly occurred. It was managed conventionally by several endoscopic balloon dilatations without any stable results. It was found legitimate to offer the patient a revision of the gastrojejunostomy. Prior to performing the reintervention, a nasojejunal tube was placed in order to improve the patient’s enteral nutrition. Surgery consisted in the resection of the existing gastrojejunostomy and in the tailoring of a new manual anastomosis using the da Vinci™ robotic Surgical System. The postoperative outcome was uneventful. The patient no longer reports any dysphagia 3 months postoperatively.
Full endoscopic robot-assisted trisegmentectomy of the pulmonary left upper lobe for diagnosis and treatment
Objective:
When small pulmonary lesions are discovered on CT-scan during cancer surveillance, the differentiation between primary cancer metastasis and another metachronous carcinoma is impossible on frozen section. In this context, segmentectomy as sparing-lung resection is probably a valuable option to treat both lesions. However, segmentectomy is a complex procedure when using video thoracoscopy. Robotic segmentectomy, as described by Ninan (1) and Melfi (2), could be a more accurate and easier approach. Our objective is to show this reproducible technique.

Bibliographic references:
1. Ninan M, Dylewski MR. Total port-access robot-assisted pulmonary lobectomy without utility thoracotomy. Eur J Cardiothorac Surg 2010;38:231-2.
2. Melfi FM, Menconi GF, Mariani AM, Angeletti CA. Early experience with robotic technology for thoracoscopic surgery. Eur J Cardiothorac Surg 2002;21:864-8.
Materials and methods:
In 2006, a 78-year-old man was found with a medical history of asbestos exposure and colonic adenocarcinoma with lymph node metastasis treated by hemi-colectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy. During colon cancer surveillance, a centrimetric pulmonary mass of the left upper lobe was found on CT-scan in September 2012. In this context, the lesion was suggestive of metastasis, but primary lung cancer could not be ruled out (due to the patient’s history of smoking). As a result, trisegmentectomy of the left upper lobe was decided upon instead of wedge resection, for diagnosis and treatment of the lesion.
Results: The postoperative course was uneventful, with a medical discharge on the fourth day following trisegmentectomy. Pathological findings concluded to a primary lung carcinoma without lymph node invasion.
Conclusion: Complete and precise segmentectomy can be performed safely by means of the da Vinci™ robotic system, without using a utility thoracotomy. This diagnostic and therapeutic option must be considered in case of small pulmonary lesions occurring during cancer surveillance.
JM Baste, M Renaux-Petel, C Peillon
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
1109 views
6 likes
0 comments
11:42
Full endoscopic robot-assisted trisegmentectomy of the pulmonary left upper lobe for diagnosis and treatment
Objective:
When small pulmonary lesions are discovered on CT-scan during cancer surveillance, the differentiation between primary cancer metastasis and another metachronous carcinoma is impossible on frozen section. In this context, segmentectomy as sparing-lung resection is probably a valuable option to treat both lesions. However, segmentectomy is a complex procedure when using video thoracoscopy. Robotic segmentectomy, as described by Ninan (1) and Melfi (2), could be a more accurate and easier approach. Our objective is to show this reproducible technique.

Bibliographic references:
1. Ninan M, Dylewski MR. Total port-access robot-assisted pulmonary lobectomy without utility thoracotomy. Eur J Cardiothorac Surg 2010;38:231-2.
2. Melfi FM, Menconi GF, Mariani AM, Angeletti CA. Early experience with robotic technology for thoracoscopic surgery. Eur J Cardiothorac Surg 2002;21:864-8.
Materials and methods:
In 2006, a 78-year-old man was found with a medical history of asbestos exposure and colonic adenocarcinoma with lymph node metastasis treated by hemi-colectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy. During colon cancer surveillance, a centrimetric pulmonary mass of the left upper lobe was found on CT-scan in September 2012. In this context, the lesion was suggestive of metastasis, but primary lung cancer could not be ruled out (due to the patient’s history of smoking). As a result, trisegmentectomy of the left upper lobe was decided upon instead of wedge resection, for diagnosis and treatment of the lesion.
Results: The postoperative course was uneventful, with a medical discharge on the fourth day following trisegmentectomy. Pathological findings concluded to a primary lung carcinoma without lymph node invasion.
Conclusion: Complete and precise segmentectomy can be performed safely by means of the da Vinci™ robotic system, without using a utility thoracotomy. This diagnostic and therapeutic option must be considered in case of small pulmonary lesions occurring during cancer surveillance.
Simultaneous robotic right partial nephrectomy and right adrenalectomy
Robot-assisted partial nephrectomy has become a safe procedure if standardized surgical steps are followed [1]. The same goes for robot-assisted adrenalectomy, with the robot offering the possibility to manage complex cases that are considered technically challenging for traditional laparoscopy [2].
A combined laparoscopic partial nephrectomy and an ipsilateral adrenalectomy have been described for upper pole renal tumors contiguously involving the adrenal gland [3].
In this video, we describe the surgical steps for a simultaneous robotic right partial nephrectomy and right adrenalectomy for two distinct renal and adrenal tumors.
References:
[1] Kaouk JH, Khalifeh A, Hillyer S, Haber GP, Stein RJ, Autorino R. Robot-assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy: step-by-step contemporary technique and surgical outcomes at a single high-volume institution. Eur Urol 2012;62:553-61.
[2] D’Annibale A, Lucandri G, Monsellato I, De Angelis M, Pernazza G, Alfano G, Mazzocchi P, Pende V. Robotic adrenalectomy: technical aspects, early results and learning curve. Int J Med Robot 2012;8:483-90.
[3] Ramani AP, Abreu SC, Desai MM, Steinberg AP, Ng C, Lin CH, Kaouk JH, Gill IS. Laparoscopic upper pole partial nephrectomy with concomitant en bloc adrenalectomy. Urology 2003;62:223-6.
D Rey, E El Helou, M Oderda, T Piéchaud
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
5268 views
85 likes
0 comments
13:06
Simultaneous robotic right partial nephrectomy and right adrenalectomy
Robot-assisted partial nephrectomy has become a safe procedure if standardized surgical steps are followed [1]. The same goes for robot-assisted adrenalectomy, with the robot offering the possibility to manage complex cases that are considered technically challenging for traditional laparoscopy [2].
A combined laparoscopic partial nephrectomy and an ipsilateral adrenalectomy have been described for upper pole renal tumors contiguously involving the adrenal gland [3].
In this video, we describe the surgical steps for a simultaneous robotic right partial nephrectomy and right adrenalectomy for two distinct renal and adrenal tumors.
References:
[1] Kaouk JH, Khalifeh A, Hillyer S, Haber GP, Stein RJ, Autorino R. Robot-assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy: step-by-step contemporary technique and surgical outcomes at a single high-volume institution. Eur Urol 2012;62:553-61.
[2] D’Annibale A, Lucandri G, Monsellato I, De Angelis M, Pernazza G, Alfano G, Mazzocchi P, Pende V. Robotic adrenalectomy: technical aspects, early results and learning curve. Int J Med Robot 2012;8:483-90.
[3] Ramani AP, Abreu SC, Desai MM, Steinberg AP, Ng C, Lin CH, Kaouk JH, Gill IS. Laparoscopic upper pole partial nephrectomy with concomitant en bloc adrenalectomy. Urology 2003;62:223-6.
Full endoscopic robotic assisted upper left lung lobectomy for a suspicious lesion
Objective:
To present a complete endoscopic approach for thoracic resection using the Da Vinci™ robotic device (Ninan M, MR Dylewski. Total port-access robot-assisted pulmonary lobectomy without utility thoracotomy. Eur J Cardiothorac Surg 2010;38:231-2).
Methods:
A 62-year-old man was a former smoker with an accumulated dose of 70 packs of cigarettes a year and had a history of rheumatic polyarthritis under immunotherapy. He presented a deterioration of his overall health condition and a CT-scan was performed. The CT-scan showed a ground-glass opacity (GGO) in the left upper lobe. Functional respiratory tests were the following: FEV1 51% and DLCO 65%, and the patient completed 4 floors at the stair-climbing test. An upper left lobectomy using a Da Vinci™ robotic system was performed with a high level of safety.
Results: The postoperative course was uneventful. Pathological findings confirmed the diagnosis of a benign granuloma. Our patient has not shown any incidence during a one-month follow-up and his physician reintroduced his immunosuppressive treatment.
Conclusion: Complete and precise lobectomy can be performed safely by means of the Da Vinci™ robotic system with low morbidity.
JM Baste, V Díaz-Ravetllat, C Peillon
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
1231 views
17 likes
0 comments
07:10
Full endoscopic robotic assisted upper left lung lobectomy for a suspicious lesion
Objective:
To present a complete endoscopic approach for thoracic resection using the Da Vinci™ robotic device (Ninan M, MR Dylewski. Total port-access robot-assisted pulmonary lobectomy without utility thoracotomy. Eur J Cardiothorac Surg 2010;38:231-2).
Methods:
A 62-year-old man was a former smoker with an accumulated dose of 70 packs of cigarettes a year and had a history of rheumatic polyarthritis under immunotherapy. He presented a deterioration of his overall health condition and a CT-scan was performed. The CT-scan showed a ground-glass opacity (GGO) in the left upper lobe. Functional respiratory tests were the following: FEV1 51% and DLCO 65%, and the patient completed 4 floors at the stair-climbing test. An upper left lobectomy using a Da Vinci™ robotic system was performed with a high level of safety.
Results: The postoperative course was uneventful. Pathological findings confirmed the diagnosis of a benign granuloma. Our patient has not shown any incidence during a one-month follow-up and his physician reintroduced his immunosuppressive treatment.
Conclusion: Complete and precise lobectomy can be performed safely by means of the Da Vinci™ robotic system with low morbidity.
Robotic assisted thymectomy for the management of autoimmune myasthenia gravis
We present the case of a 16-year-old female patient who has had an autoimmune myasthenia gravis for 8 months.

Symptoms are generalized to her four arms. Anti-acetylcholine antibodies and the therapeutic test of Mestinon® (Pyridostigmine) are positive.
In recent months, her symptoms worsened with the onset of swallowing disorders.

Immunoglobulin treatment was poorly effective and was complicated by the appearance of jaundice. CT-scan showed a mediastinal thymic hyperplasia.
Thymectomy is indicated. To do so, a left thoracoscopy is performed and assisted by means of the Da Vinci™ robot.

Pathological findings demonstrated the presence of a lymphoid thymic hyperplasia.

The use of the Da Vinci® robot for this type of intervention has been recognized many years ago now with the works of Federico Rea and Jens Ruckert among others. The advantage of this technique is the possibility to proceed with a radical thymectomy enlarged to the mediastinal fat exactly in the same way as for a median sternotomy, which is the standard technique. When compared to thoracoscopy, the advantage stems from 3D vision, segmentation of the operator’s movements, and exceptional maneuverability of the instruments which have 7 degrees of freedom. These instruments allow for an access to the lower cervical area without the use of a cervicotomy. The choice of the left side is explained by the need to identify the phrenic nerve’s position, which is more difficult to predict than the right nerve’s position, which can be easily identified on the right lateral aspect of the superior vena cava.
N Santelmo, A Olland
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
1803 views
23 likes
0 comments
11:26
Robotic assisted thymectomy for the management of autoimmune myasthenia gravis
We present the case of a 16-year-old female patient who has had an autoimmune myasthenia gravis for 8 months.

Symptoms are generalized to her four arms. Anti-acetylcholine antibodies and the therapeutic test of Mestinon® (Pyridostigmine) are positive.
In recent months, her symptoms worsened with the onset of swallowing disorders.

Immunoglobulin treatment was poorly effective and was complicated by the appearance of jaundice. CT-scan showed a mediastinal thymic hyperplasia.
Thymectomy is indicated. To do so, a left thoracoscopy is performed and assisted by means of the Da Vinci™ robot.

Pathological findings demonstrated the presence of a lymphoid thymic hyperplasia.

The use of the Da Vinci® robot for this type of intervention has been recognized many years ago now with the works of Federico Rea and Jens Ruckert among others. The advantage of this technique is the possibility to proceed with a radical thymectomy enlarged to the mediastinal fat exactly in the same way as for a median sternotomy, which is the standard technique. When compared to thoracoscopy, the advantage stems from 3D vision, segmentation of the operator’s movements, and exceptional maneuverability of the instruments which have 7 degrees of freedom. These instruments allow for an access to the lower cervical area without the use of a cervicotomy. The choice of the left side is explained by the need to identify the phrenic nerve’s position, which is more difficult to predict than the right nerve’s position, which can be easily identified on the right lateral aspect of the superior vena cava.
Robotic-assisted mini gastric bypass
Amongst bariatric procedures, mini gastric bypass has been described by Rutledge in 2001 with the objective of simplifying the gastric bypass technique (1). Mini gastric bypass only requires one anastomosis instead of 2 and should reduce complications related to the anastomosis at the foot of the loop in a conventional gastric bypass procedure. A few specificities should be pointed out. The gastric pouch is longer and more narrow. The landmark used to start the gastric division corresponds to the area separating the body of the stomach from the antrum at the level of the angulus. The biliary limb is also much longer and should reach 2cm in order to avoid the undiluted biliary fluid effects on the anastomosis. In this intervention, it is crucial to closue Petersen’s defect between the mounted loop and the transverse mesocolon. According to Himpens, this procedure could well reduce the incidence of hypoglycemias that might occur after a gastric bypass. This video outlines the different steps of the intervention. The use of a surgical robot allows to very easily perform a manual gastrojejunostomy.

(1). Rutledge, R. The mini-gastric bypass: experience with the first 1,274 cases. Obes Surg 2001;11:276-80.
M Vix, KH Liu, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
2086 views
47 likes
1 comment
15:41
Robotic-assisted mini gastric bypass
Amongst bariatric procedures, mini gastric bypass has been described by Rutledge in 2001 with the objective of simplifying the gastric bypass technique (1). Mini gastric bypass only requires one anastomosis instead of 2 and should reduce complications related to the anastomosis at the foot of the loop in a conventional gastric bypass procedure. A few specificities should be pointed out. The gastric pouch is longer and more narrow. The landmark used to start the gastric division corresponds to the area separating the body of the stomach from the antrum at the level of the angulus. The biliary limb is also much longer and should reach 2cm in order to avoid the undiluted biliary fluid effects on the anastomosis. In this intervention, it is crucial to closue Petersen’s defect between the mounted loop and the transverse mesocolon. According to Himpens, this procedure could well reduce the incidence of hypoglycemias that might occur after a gastric bypass. This video outlines the different steps of the intervention. The use of a surgical robot allows to very easily perform a manual gastrojejunostomy.

(1). Rutledge, R. The mini-gastric bypass: experience with the first 1,274 cases. Obes Surg 2001;11:276-80.
Middle lobectomy for a typical carcinoid tumor using 4 robotic arms
We present the case of a 78-year-old woman with a typical carcinoid tumor of the middle lobe of the lung. Bronchoscopy was carried out. A tumor lying in the deep segment of the middle lobe bronchus was identified by biopsy as a typical carcinoid tumor. We decided to perform middle lobectomy using a four-arm robotic assistance as it allows for a minimally invasive surgery.

The patient is intubated with a double lumen tracheal tube. The patient is placed in a left-sided decubitus with the right arm hanging. Anesthesiologists and mechanical ventilation need to be placed on the patient’s right side. This will provide sufficient room to approach the robot on the left side with a 30-degree angulation to the patient’s head.

The robotic procedure was uneventful and was fully carried out. Chest tube drainage was removed on postoperative day 2 and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 7.
N Santelmo, A Olland
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
1875 views
4 likes
0 comments
14:03
Middle lobectomy for a typical carcinoid tumor using 4 robotic arms
We present the case of a 78-year-old woman with a typical carcinoid tumor of the middle lobe of the lung. Bronchoscopy was carried out. A tumor lying in the deep segment of the middle lobe bronchus was identified by biopsy as a typical carcinoid tumor. We decided to perform middle lobectomy using a four-arm robotic assistance as it allows for a minimally invasive surgery.

The patient is intubated with a double lumen tracheal tube. The patient is placed in a left-sided decubitus with the right arm hanging. Anesthesiologists and mechanical ventilation need to be placed on the patient’s right side. This will provide sufficient room to approach the robot on the left side with a 30-degree angulation to the patient’s head.

The robotic procedure was uneventful and was fully carried out. Chest tube drainage was removed on postoperative day 2 and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 7.
Robot-assisted left adrenalectomy for Conn's adenoma
As laparoscopy is the standard approach to perform an adrenalectomy, robotic assistance is considered as an effective tool to perform this resection. Surgical steps follow those established for laparoscopy (i.e., mobilization of the spleen and of the pancreas in a patient placed in a lateral position, identification of the renal vein, control and division of the adrenal vein, successive freeing of the medial, external, inferior, and finally posterior aspects of the gland. The sealing devices such as ultrasonic dissectors are well adapted to perform this resection, and to safely control adrenal arteries. Robotic assistance takes full benefit from the degrees of freedom of the tips of the instruments and allows for an easy adrenal gland mobilization and removal.
D Mutter, L Soler, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
1649 views
23 likes
0 comments
16:19
Robot-assisted left adrenalectomy for Conn's adenoma
As laparoscopy is the standard approach to perform an adrenalectomy, robotic assistance is considered as an effective tool to perform this resection. Surgical steps follow those established for laparoscopy (i.e., mobilization of the spleen and of the pancreas in a patient placed in a lateral position, identification of the renal vein, control and division of the adrenal vein, successive freeing of the medial, external, inferior, and finally posterior aspects of the gland. The sealing devices such as ultrasonic dissectors are well adapted to perform this resection, and to safely control adrenal arteries. Robotic assistance takes full benefit from the degrees of freedom of the tips of the instruments and allows for an easy adrenal gland mobilization and removal.
Robotic-assisted bladder neck reconstruction using the Goebell-Stoeckel technique and Mitrofanoff appendicovesicostomy
This video reports our experience with robotic bladder neck reconstruction using the Goebell Stoeckel technique and Mitrofanoff appendicovesicostomy.
It is the case of a 62-year-old woman who initially had her urinary stress incontinence treated with a suburethral sling that resulted in the migration of the prosthetic material in the urethra. After prosthesis removal, two attempts of suburethral slings and an attempt at balloon implantation also resulted in erosions and migration of the prosthetic material.
We recommend a continent derivation according to Mitrofanoff principles along with a suburethral autologous sling using Goebell Stoeckel technique.
The video demonstrates that this procedure is feasible and safe with encouraging results.
D Rey, R Mazloum, VE Corona Montes, T Piéchaud
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
1782 views
21 likes
1 comment
14:36
Robotic-assisted bladder neck reconstruction using the Goebell-Stoeckel technique and Mitrofanoff appendicovesicostomy
This video reports our experience with robotic bladder neck reconstruction using the Goebell Stoeckel technique and Mitrofanoff appendicovesicostomy.
It is the case of a 62-year-old woman who initially had her urinary stress incontinence treated with a suburethral sling that resulted in the migration of the prosthetic material in the urethra. After prosthesis removal, two attempts of suburethral slings and an attempt at balloon implantation also resulted in erosions and migration of the prosthetic material.
We recommend a continent derivation according to Mitrofanoff principles along with a suburethral autologous sling using Goebell Stoeckel technique.
The video demonstrates that this procedure is feasible and safe with encouraging results.
Robot-assisted cystoprostatectomy with intracorporeal urinary diversion using a Hautmann technique
It is the case of a 62-year-old man diagnosed with a T2bN0M0 transitional cell adenocarcinoma, which was evidenced by pathological findings after resection of a bladder tumor.
Seven ports are required prior to the installation of the DaVinci® robotic system:
- 12mm port on superior border of umbilicus.
- Right robotic port at the midline between anterior superior iliac spine and umbilicus. - Two 5mm ports on both sides of right robotic port.
- Additional 12mm port between the two 5mm ports once dissection of bladder pedicles has been started.
- Two left robotic ports in left iliac fossa and anterior axillary line.
This video demonstrates the cystoprostatectomy technique with a W-pouch intracorporeal neobladder (Hautmann ileal neobladder), which is feasible in specialized centers.
References:
1. Kaufman DS, Shipley WU, Feldman AS. Bladder cancer. Lancet 2009;374(9685):239-49.
2. Lee DJ, Rothberg MB, McKiernan JM, Benson MC, Badani KK. Robot-assisted radical cystoprostatectomy in complex surgical patients: single institution report. Can J Urol 2009;16(3):4664-9.
3. Tunuguntla HS, Nieder AM, Manoharan M. Neobladder reconstruction following radical cystoprostatectomy for invasive bladder cancer. Minerva Urol Nefrol 2009;61(1):41-54.
4. Barocas DA, Patel SG, Chang SS, Clark PE, Smith JA Jr, Cookson MS. Outcomes of patients undergoing radical cystroprostatectomy for bladder cancer with prostatic involvement on final pathology. BJU Int 2009;104(8):1091-7.
5. Pruthi RS, Stefaniak H, Hubbard JS, Wallen EM. Robotic anterior pelvic exenteration for bladder cancer in the female: outcomes and comparisons to their male counterparts. J Laparoendosc Adv Surg Tech A 2009;19(1):23-7.
6. Kefer JC, Campbell SC. Current status of prostate-sparing cystectomy. Urol Oncol 2008;26(5):486-93.
7. Rawal S, Raghunath SK, Khanna S, Jain D, Kaul R, Kumar P, Chhabra R, Brushan K. Minilaparotomy radical cystoprostatectomy (Minilap RCP) in the surgical management of urinary bladder carcinoma: early experience. Jpn J Clin Oncol 2008;38(9):611-6.
8. Park SY, Cho KS, Ham WS, Choi HM, Hong SJ, Rha KH. Robot-assisted laparoscopic radical cystoprostatectomy with ileal conduit urinary diversion: initial experience in Korea. J Laparoendosc Adv Surg Tech A 2008;18(3):401-4.
9. Gregori A, Galli S, Goumas I, Scieri F, Stener S, Gaboardi F. A cost comparison of laparoscopic versus open radical cystoprostatectomy and orthotopic ileal neobladder at a single institution. Arch Ital Urol Androl 2007;79(3):127-9.
10. Young JL, Finley DS, Ornstein DD. Robotic-assisted laparoscopic cystoprostatectomy for prostatic carcinosarcoma. JSLS 2007;11(1)109-
12.
11. Nuñez-Mora C, Cabrera P, Garcia-Mediero JM, de Fata FR, Gonzalez J, Angulo J. Laparoscopic radical cystectomy and orthotopic urinary diversion in the malepatient: technique. Arch Esp Urol 2011;64(3):195-206.
12. Rehman J, Sangalli MN, Guru K, de Naeyer G, Schatteman P, Carpentier P, Mottrie A. Total intracorporeal robot-assisted laparoscopic ileal conduit (Bricker) urinary diversion: technique and outcomes. Can J Urol 2011;18(1):5548-56.
13. Canda AE, Asil E, Balbay MD. An unexpected resident in the ileum detected during robot-assisted laparoscopic radical cystoprostatectomy and intracorporeal Studer pouch formation: Taenia saginata parasite. J Endourol 2011;25(2):301-3.
14. Lin T, Huang J, Han J, Xu K, Huang H, Jiang C, Liu H, Zhang C, Yao Y, Xie W, Shah AK, Huang L. Hybrid laparoscopic endoscopic single-site surgery for radical cystoprostatectomy and orthotopic ileal neobladder: an initial experience of 12 cases. J Endourol 2011;25(1):57-63.
15. Josephson DY, Chen JA, Chan KG, Lau CS, Nelson RA, Wilson TG. Robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical cystoprostatectomy and extracorporeal continent urinary diversion: highlight of surgical techniques and outcomes. Int J Med Robot 2010;6(3):315-23.
16. Kasraeian A, Barret E, Cathelineau X, Rozet F, Galiano M, Sánchez-Salas R, Vallancien G. Robot-assisted laparoscopic cystoprostatectomy with extended pelvic lymphadenectomy, extracorporeal enterocystoplasty, and intracorporeal enterourethral anastomosis: initial Montsouris Experience. J Endourol 2010;24(3):409-13.
17. Varinot J, Camparo P, Roupret M, Bitker MO, Capron F, Cussenot O, Witjes JA, Compérat E. Full analysis of the prostatic urethra at the time of radical cystoprostatectomy for bladder cancer: impact on final disease stage. Virchows Arch 2009;455(5):449-53.
18. Palou Redorta J, Gaya Sopena JM, Gausa Gascon K, Sanchez-Martin F, Rosales Bordes A, Rodriguez Faba O, Villavicencio Mavrich H. Robotic radical cystoprostatectomy: oncological and functional analysis. Actas Urol Esp 2009;33(7):759-66.
D Rey, VE Corona Montes, T Piéchaud
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
4696 views
99 likes
0 comments
10:22
Robot-assisted cystoprostatectomy with intracorporeal urinary diversion using a Hautmann technique
It is the case of a 62-year-old man diagnosed with a T2bN0M0 transitional cell adenocarcinoma, which was evidenced by pathological findings after resection of a bladder tumor.
Seven ports are required prior to the installation of the DaVinci® robotic system:
- 12mm port on superior border of umbilicus.
- Right robotic port at the midline between anterior superior iliac spine and umbilicus. - Two 5mm ports on both sides of right robotic port.
- Additional 12mm port between the two 5mm ports once dissection of bladder pedicles has been started.
- Two left robotic ports in left iliac fossa and anterior axillary line.
This video demonstrates the cystoprostatectomy technique with a W-pouch intracorporeal neobladder (Hautmann ileal neobladder), which is feasible in specialized centers.
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