We use cookies to offer you an optimal experience on our website. By browsing our website, you accept the use of cookies.

General and digestive surgery

Find all the surgical interventions, lectures, experts opinions, debates, webinars and operative techniques per specialty.
Transanal minimally invasive full-thickness middle rectum polyp resection with the patient in a prone position
Background: Nowadays, rectal preservation has gained popularity when it comes to the management of degenerated rectal polyps or early rectal cancer (1, 2). Tis/T1 rectal lesions can be safely treated without chemoradiation (3). Treatment via transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) offers more advantages than endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) (4). The authors report the case of a 60-year-old woman who underwent a TAMIS procedure for a large polyp located anteriorly in the middle rectum, which was 7cm away from the pectineal line and staged as uTisN0M0 preoperatively.
Video: The patient was placed in a prone position with a split-leg kneeling position. A reusable transanal D-Port (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany) was introduced into the anus together with DAPRI monocurved instruments (Figure 1). The polyp was put in evidence (Figure 2) and resection margins were defined circumferentially using the monocurved coagulating hook. A full-thickness resection was performed with a complete removal of the rectal serosa and exposure of the peritoneal cavity, due to the anatomical polyp positioning (Figure 3). The rectal opening was subsequently closed using two converging full-thickness running sutures using 3/0 V-loc™ sutures (Figure 4a). The two sutures were started laterally and joined together medially (Figure 4b).
Results: Total operative time was 60 minutes whereas suturing time was 35 minutes. There was no perioperative bleeding. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged after 2 days. The pathological report showed a tubular adenoma with high-grade dysplasia and clear margins.
Conclusions: In the presence of degenerated rectal polyps, full-thickness TAMIS is oncologically safe and feasible. The final rectal flap can be safely closed by means of laparoscopic endoluminal sutures.
G Dapri, L Qin Yi, A Wong, P Tan Enjiu, S Hsien Lin, D Lee, T Kok Yang, S Mantoo
Surgical intervention
11 months ago
814 views
196 likes
0 comments
05:53
Transanal minimally invasive full-thickness middle rectum polyp resection with the patient in a prone position
Background: Nowadays, rectal preservation has gained popularity when it comes to the management of degenerated rectal polyps or early rectal cancer (1, 2). Tis/T1 rectal lesions can be safely treated without chemoradiation (3). Treatment via transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) offers more advantages than endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) (4). The authors report the case of a 60-year-old woman who underwent a TAMIS procedure for a large polyp located anteriorly in the middle rectum, which was 7cm away from the pectineal line and staged as uTisN0M0 preoperatively.
Video: The patient was placed in a prone position with a split-leg kneeling position. A reusable transanal D-Port (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany) was introduced into the anus together with DAPRI monocurved instruments (Figure 1). The polyp was put in evidence (Figure 2) and resection margins were defined circumferentially using the monocurved coagulating hook. A full-thickness resection was performed with a complete removal of the rectal serosa and exposure of the peritoneal cavity, due to the anatomical polyp positioning (Figure 3). The rectal opening was subsequently closed using two converging full-thickness running sutures using 3/0 V-loc™ sutures (Figure 4a). The two sutures were started laterally and joined together medially (Figure 4b).
Results: Total operative time was 60 minutes whereas suturing time was 35 minutes. There was no perioperative bleeding. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged after 2 days. The pathological report showed a tubular adenoma with high-grade dysplasia and clear margins.
Conclusions: In the presence of degenerated rectal polyps, full-thickness TAMIS is oncologically safe and feasible. The final rectal flap can be safely closed by means of laparoscopic endoluminal sutures.
Double transanal laparoscopic resection of large anal canal and low rectum polyps
Background: Rectal polyps, and especially small and medium-sized lesions are removed via conventional endoscopy. Large rectal polyps can be approached using endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). In more recent years, laparoscopic surgery underwent an evolution and a new application for endoluminal resection called transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) was introduced. The authors report the case of a 79-year-old man presenting with two large polyps of the anal canal (uTisN0) and low rectum (uTis vs T1N0), which were removed through TAMIS.
Video: The patient was placed in a prone, jackknife position with legs apart. The reusable transanal D-Port was introduced into the anus. Exploration of the cavity showed the presence of a large polyp involving the entire length of the anal canal and part of the lower third of the rectum and a second large polyp located 1cm above in the lower third of the rectum. The anal canal polyp was removed with the preservation of the muscular layer. The lower third rectal polyp was removed by resecting the full-thickness of the rectal wall. During the entire procedure, the surgeon worked under satisfactory ergonomics. The polyps were removed through the D-Port. The mucosal and submucosal flaps for anal canal resection, as well as the entire rectal wall opening for low rectal resection, were closed by means of two converging absorbable sutures.
Results: Operative time was 78 minutes for the anal canal polyp and 53 minutes for the low rectum polyp. Perioperative bleeding was 10cc. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged after 1 day. The pathological report for both polyps showed a tubulovillous adenoma with high-grade dysplasia and free margins (stage: pTis, 8 UICC edition).
Conclusions: TAMIS for double and large polyps located in the anal canal and low rectum offers advantages, such as excellent field exposure, safe en bloc polypectomy, and final endoluminal defect closure.
G Dapri
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1129 views
232 likes
1 comment
07:49
Double transanal laparoscopic resection of large anal canal and low rectum polyps
Background: Rectal polyps, and especially small and medium-sized lesions are removed via conventional endoscopy. Large rectal polyps can be approached using endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). In more recent years, laparoscopic surgery underwent an evolution and a new application for endoluminal resection called transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) was introduced. The authors report the case of a 79-year-old man presenting with two large polyps of the anal canal (uTisN0) and low rectum (uTis vs T1N0), which were removed through TAMIS.
Video: The patient was placed in a prone, jackknife position with legs apart. The reusable transanal D-Port was introduced into the anus. Exploration of the cavity showed the presence of a large polyp involving the entire length of the anal canal and part of the lower third of the rectum and a second large polyp located 1cm above in the lower third of the rectum. The anal canal polyp was removed with the preservation of the muscular layer. The lower third rectal polyp was removed by resecting the full-thickness of the rectal wall. During the entire procedure, the surgeon worked under satisfactory ergonomics. The polyps were removed through the D-Port. The mucosal and submucosal flaps for anal canal resection, as well as the entire rectal wall opening for low rectal resection, were closed by means of two converging absorbable sutures.
Results: Operative time was 78 minutes for the anal canal polyp and 53 minutes for the low rectum polyp. Perioperative bleeding was 10cc. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged after 1 day. The pathological report for both polyps showed a tubulovillous adenoma with high-grade dysplasia and free margins (stage: pTis, 8 UICC edition).
Conclusions: TAMIS for double and large polyps located in the anal canal and low rectum offers advantages, such as excellent field exposure, safe en bloc polypectomy, and final endoluminal defect closure.