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General and digestive surgery

Find all the surgical interventions, lectures, experts opinions, debates, webinars and operative techniques per specialty.


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Robotic central pancreatectomy for a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor
In this video, we show a robotic central pancreatectomy for a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor. This is the case of a 50-year-old patient admitted to the emergency department for acute pancreatitis. CT-scan and MRI demonstrate the presence of a hypervascularized lesion of approximately 15mm in diameter, at the pancreatic isthmus. Scintigraphy does not evidence any intense uptake.
The colon and the omentum are detached and the stomach is suspended laparoscopically. The robot is docked using a lateral approach. A retropancreatic passage is achieved on the mesenteric-portal axis. An intraoperative ultrasonography is performed to visualize the tumor and delimitate the resection margins. After the dissection, the anastomosis is performed between the distal part of the pancreatic remnant and the posterior gastric wall.
A postoperative pancreatic fistula grade B was reported. It was successfully managed. The presence of a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor was confirmed. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 22.
P Pessaux, E Felli, T Wakabayashi, Z Cherkaoui, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 month ago
1161 views
2 likes
3 comments
07:01
Robotic central pancreatectomy for a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor
In this video, we show a robotic central pancreatectomy for a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor. This is the case of a 50-year-old patient admitted to the emergency department for acute pancreatitis. CT-scan and MRI demonstrate the presence of a hypervascularized lesion of approximately 15mm in diameter, at the pancreatic isthmus. Scintigraphy does not evidence any intense uptake.
The colon and the omentum are detached and the stomach is suspended laparoscopically. The robot is docked using a lateral approach. A retropancreatic passage is achieved on the mesenteric-portal axis. An intraoperative ultrasonography is performed to visualize the tumor and delimitate the resection margins. After the dissection, the anastomosis is performed between the distal part of the pancreatic remnant and the posterior gastric wall.
A postoperative pancreatic fistula grade B was reported. It was successfully managed. The presence of a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor was confirmed. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 22.
Laparoscopic Frey's procedure with management of intraoperative complication
This is the case of a 61-year-old lady presenting with recurrent abdominal intractable pain she has been suffering from for the last 7 years. Multi-slice CT (MSCT) revealed pancreatic calcifications from 1 to 5-8mm and dilatation of the main pancreatic duct in the body of the pancreas up to 4mm. The patient underwent laparoscopic local resection of the pancreatic head combined with a longitudinal Roux-en-Y pancreaticojejunostomy, a technique known as Frey's procedure. It is recognized as an effective therapeutic option for the surgical treatment of patients with persistent pain caused by chronic pancreatitis.
After fashioning the posterior wall of the pancreaticojejunal anastomosis, we faced an intraoperative complication such as a volvulus of the Roux limb causing serious ischemia of the limb. We were forced to remove all previous sutures in order to untwist the Roux limb. The pancreaticojejunostomy was started anew afterwards.
The purpose of this video is to demonstrate that Frey's procedure can be performed in a minimally invasive fashion, which provides all the well-known advantages of this approach. We demonstrate that even a serious intraoperative complication such as a volvulus of the Roux limb can be managed without conversion. Our center has an experience of over 30 laparoscopic Frey's procedures. However, this is the first case where we encountered this complication and we believe this is an experience worth sharing.
Yet, we would like to underline that this approach should be used by highly skilled minimally invasive surgeons with an experience in intracorporeal suturing, which is the most challenging stage in Frey's procedure.
P Agami, A Andrianov, V Shchadrova, M Baychorov, R Izrailov
Surgical intervention
1 month ago
2287 views
8 likes
4 comments
12:28
Laparoscopic Frey's procedure with management of intraoperative complication
This is the case of a 61-year-old lady presenting with recurrent abdominal intractable pain she has been suffering from for the last 7 years. Multi-slice CT (MSCT) revealed pancreatic calcifications from 1 to 5-8mm and dilatation of the main pancreatic duct in the body of the pancreas up to 4mm. The patient underwent laparoscopic local resection of the pancreatic head combined with a longitudinal Roux-en-Y pancreaticojejunostomy, a technique known as Frey's procedure. It is recognized as an effective therapeutic option for the surgical treatment of patients with persistent pain caused by chronic pancreatitis.
After fashioning the posterior wall of the pancreaticojejunal anastomosis, we faced an intraoperative complication such as a volvulus of the Roux limb causing serious ischemia of the limb. We were forced to remove all previous sutures in order to untwist the Roux limb. The pancreaticojejunostomy was started anew afterwards.
The purpose of this video is to demonstrate that Frey's procedure can be performed in a minimally invasive fashion, which provides all the well-known advantages of this approach. We demonstrate that even a serious intraoperative complication such as a volvulus of the Roux limb can be managed without conversion. Our center has an experience of over 30 laparoscopic Frey's procedures. However, this is the first case where we encountered this complication and we believe this is an experience worth sharing.
Yet, we would like to underline that this approach should be used by highly skilled minimally invasive surgeons with an experience in intracorporeal suturing, which is the most challenging stage in Frey's procedure.
Laparoscopic left lateral sectionectomy for hepatocarcinoma in a cirrhotic patient
This video demonstrates a laparoscopic left lateral sectionectomy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in a cirrhotic liver with hemochromatosis. This is the case of a 77-year-old patient who presented with a 40mm HCC located in Couinaud’s liver segment II and III. After left liver mobilization, parenchymal transection was initiated along the left side of the falciform ligament, mainly using the cavitron ultrasonic surgical aspirator (CUSA®). Tissue Select mode was used during the exposure of the vascular structure. The Glissonian pedicles of segments III and II were encircled and transected, and finally the suprahepatic vein was divided using an Endo GIA™ linear stapler. The specimen was extracted with a short suprapubic incision. The postoperative outcome was uneventful. Final pathological findings confirmed the diagnosis of a well-differentiated HCC.
P Pessaux, T Urade, T Wakabayashi, E Felli, A Mazzotta, Z Cherkaoui, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 month ago
842 views
7 likes
0 comments
07:22
Laparoscopic left lateral sectionectomy for hepatocarcinoma in a cirrhotic patient
This video demonstrates a laparoscopic left lateral sectionectomy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in a cirrhotic liver with hemochromatosis. This is the case of a 77-year-old patient who presented with a 40mm HCC located in Couinaud’s liver segment II and III. After left liver mobilization, parenchymal transection was initiated along the left side of the falciform ligament, mainly using the cavitron ultrasonic surgical aspirator (CUSA®). Tissue Select mode was used during the exposure of the vascular structure. The Glissonian pedicles of segments III and II were encircled and transected, and finally the suprahepatic vein was divided using an Endo GIA™ linear stapler. The specimen was extracted with a short suprapubic incision. The postoperative outcome was uneventful. Final pathological findings confirmed the diagnosis of a well-differentiated HCC.
Laparoscopic left hepatectomy for a suspected biliary cystadenoma
This is the case of a 69-year-old male patient presenting to the emergency department for abdominal pain and fever. After CT-scan and liver MRI, a biliary cystadenoma was suspected. CEA and CA 19-9 were normal. Hydatid cyst serology was negative. Considering the localization and the size of the tumor, a left laparoscopic hepatectomy was indicated. The patient’s surgical history included laparoscopic sigmoidectomy, intestinal occlusion for internal hernia, appendectomy, and bilateral inguinal hernia repair. Dissection of adhesions and cholecystectomy were performed first. After transection of the left hepatic artery and the left portal vein, parenchymal transection was performed by exposing the middle hepatic vein under intermittent clamping using blood flow occlusion. During parenchymal transection, the left hepatic duct and the left hepatic vein were divided. The specimen was extracted through a suprapubic incision. The postoperative outcome was uneventful. Pathological findings showed the presence of a biliary cyst communicating with the biliary system, without any malignant characteristics.
O Soubrane, P Pessaux, E Felli, T Urade, T Wakabayashi, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 month ago
767 views
0 likes
0 comments
34:11
Laparoscopic left hepatectomy for a suspected biliary cystadenoma
This is the case of a 69-year-old male patient presenting to the emergency department for abdominal pain and fever. After CT-scan and liver MRI, a biliary cystadenoma was suspected. CEA and CA 19-9 were normal. Hydatid cyst serology was negative. Considering the localization and the size of the tumor, a left laparoscopic hepatectomy was indicated. The patient’s surgical history included laparoscopic sigmoidectomy, intestinal occlusion for internal hernia, appendectomy, and bilateral inguinal hernia repair. Dissection of adhesions and cholecystectomy were performed first. After transection of the left hepatic artery and the left portal vein, parenchymal transection was performed by exposing the middle hepatic vein under intermittent clamping using blood flow occlusion. During parenchymal transection, the left hepatic duct and the left hepatic vein were divided. The specimen was extracted through a suprapubic incision. The postoperative outcome was uneventful. Pathological findings showed the presence of a biliary cyst communicating with the biliary system, without any malignant characteristics.
Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy for intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN)
This is the case of a 76-year-old female patient who was referred to our hospital because of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN). The patient has a medical history of renal insufficiency, sleep apnea syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and hypertension. She has also a history of previous total hysterectomy.
MRI findings showed that the patient’s IPMN affected secondary pancreatic ducts entirely.
The main pancreatic duct is dilated, especially in the distal part at 6mm, but there are no remarkable findings of cystic wall thickening or intracystic nodules. A laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy was planned.
The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 8.
Pathological findings showed that the intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm was without any malignant component.
P Pessaux, E Felli, T Wakabayashi, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 month ago
895 views
4 likes
0 comments
13:26
Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy for intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN)
This is the case of a 76-year-old female patient who was referred to our hospital because of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN). The patient has a medical history of renal insufficiency, sleep apnea syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and hypertension. She has also a history of previous total hysterectomy.
MRI findings showed that the patient’s IPMN affected secondary pancreatic ducts entirely.
The main pancreatic duct is dilated, especially in the distal part at 6mm, but there are no remarkable findings of cystic wall thickening or intracystic nodules. A laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy was planned.
The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 8.
Pathological findings showed that the intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm was without any malignant component.
Robotic distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy
This is the case of a 73-year-old asymptomatic female patient who presented with an incidental pancreatic lesion on CT-scan. Her previous medical history was relevant for systemic lupus erythematosus. On the CT-scan, a single hypervascular lesion in the arterial phase was identified in the distal pancreas. The lesion size was 3.1 by 3.3 by 4.3cm. Neither suspicious nodes nor distant metastases were found. The patient was considered to be ASA2 and ECOG0.
The patient was placed in a reverse Trendelenburg position. A 12mm port was placed in the umbilicus for the camera, and three 8mm ports were inserted to accommodate the robotic arms, and another 12mm auxiliary port was used.
The greater curvature of the stomach was released from the transverse colon to expose the supramesocolic area. The neck of the pancreas was dissected close to the splenic-mesenteric confluence. The inferior mesenteric vein opening to the splenic vein was identified, clipped and cut. The splenic artery was dissected, clipped and cut close to the celiac trunk. A stapler was placed in the neck of the pancreas and it was safely stapled. The splenic vein was dissected close to the confluence, and then clipped and cut. The distal pancreas and splenic ligaments were cut and . detached. The specimen was removed using a Pfannenstiel’s incision.
The duration of the procedure was 255 minutes. The estimated blood loss was 100mL. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 5 and no complication was observed over a period of 90 days. Pathology confirmed the presence of a neuroendocrine tumor (grade 2) as a 4cm single lesion and negative margins. One positive node was detected among 10 nodes harvested.
R Araujo, MA Sanctis, F Felippe, D Burgardt, D Wohnrath
Surgical intervention
1 month ago
358 views
2 likes
0 comments
08:04
Robotic distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy
This is the case of a 73-year-old asymptomatic female patient who presented with an incidental pancreatic lesion on CT-scan. Her previous medical history was relevant for systemic lupus erythematosus. On the CT-scan, a single hypervascular lesion in the arterial phase was identified in the distal pancreas. The lesion size was 3.1 by 3.3 by 4.3cm. Neither suspicious nodes nor distant metastases were found. The patient was considered to be ASA2 and ECOG0.
The patient was placed in a reverse Trendelenburg position. A 12mm port was placed in the umbilicus for the camera, and three 8mm ports were inserted to accommodate the robotic arms, and another 12mm auxiliary port was used.
The greater curvature of the stomach was released from the transverse colon to expose the supramesocolic area. The neck of the pancreas was dissected close to the splenic-mesenteric confluence. The inferior mesenteric vein opening to the splenic vein was identified, clipped and cut. The splenic artery was dissected, clipped and cut close to the celiac trunk. A stapler was placed in the neck of the pancreas and it was safely stapled. The splenic vein was dissected close to the confluence, and then clipped and cut. The distal pancreas and splenic ligaments were cut and . detached. The specimen was removed using a Pfannenstiel’s incision.
The duration of the procedure was 255 minutes. The estimated blood loss was 100mL. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 5 and no complication was observed over a period of 90 days. Pathology confirmed the presence of a neuroendocrine tumor (grade 2) as a 4cm single lesion and negative margins. One positive node was detected among 10 nodes harvested.
Laparoscopic en bloc splenopancreatectomy with left adrenalectomy and para-aortic lymphadenectomy
The objective of this video is to present a surgical approach to a left adrenal mass caused by the invasion of a pancreatic lesion. A pulmonary lesion was also found. However, a preoperative biopsy of that lesion was impossible to perform. In order to distinguish the primary origin of this lung lesion, a laparoscopic ‘en bloc’ splenopancreatectomy combined with a left adrenalectomy and a para-aortic lymphadenectomy were planned.
Retrograde distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy is the standard procedure for cancers of the body and tail of the pancreas. In the literature, fewer studies describe the feasibility and the oncological safety of the laparoscopic approach.
This video aims to show the different operative steps of the procedure beginning with laparoscopic adrenalectomy followed by distal pancreatectomy and para-aortic lympadenectomy.
R Romito, L Portigliotti, G Bondonno, M Zacchero, A Volpe
Surgical intervention
1 month ago
281 views
6 likes
1 comment
13:28
Laparoscopic en bloc splenopancreatectomy with left adrenalectomy and para-aortic lymphadenectomy
The objective of this video is to present a surgical approach to a left adrenal mass caused by the invasion of a pancreatic lesion. A pulmonary lesion was also found. However, a preoperative biopsy of that lesion was impossible to perform. In order to distinguish the primary origin of this lung lesion, a laparoscopic ‘en bloc’ splenopancreatectomy combined with a left adrenalectomy and a para-aortic lymphadenectomy were planned.
Retrograde distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy is the standard procedure for cancers of the body and tail of the pancreas. In the literature, fewer studies describe the feasibility and the oncological safety of the laparoscopic approach.
This video aims to show the different operative steps of the procedure beginning with laparoscopic adrenalectomy followed by distal pancreatectomy and para-aortic lympadenectomy.
Laparoscopic central hepatectomy using a Glissonian approach for hepatocellular adenoma
A 32-year-old asymptomatic female patient presented an incidental finding of a liver mass during pregnancy. The mass grew during pregnancy, and a biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of hepatocellular adenoma. On MRI, a hypodense 7 by 6.1cm mass with adipose infiltration was identified. Previously, it was a 5.8 by 5.1cm mass, located in liver segments IV, V, and VIII inferiorly.
The cystic duct and its artery were ligated. However, the gallbladder was kept in place for traction. After dissection of the anterior pedicle, a linear stapler was applied. The right lobe was mobilized and the right transection line was made according to the ischemia line of the anterior sector.
During the liver transection of segment IVB, the pedicle was identified, and linear stapling helped to control it. The parenchymal transection was performed with an ultrasonic scalpel and bipolar cautery. The liver surface of the anterior sector was demarcated and transected. Both the left and the right plane of transection were inferiorly joined. The middle and right hepatic vein branches were stapled.
The specimen was mobilized. Argon beam and bipolar forceps provided the hemostasis. The specimen was removed via a Pfannenstiel’s incision and a drain was placed. The duration of the procedure was 345 minutes. The estimated blood loss was 1200mL.
The patient was discharged from the intensive care unit on postoperative day 1 and from hospital on postoperative day 4. No complication was noted in 90 days. Pathological findings showed a mass of 10.7 by 8.4 by 4.8cm. The lesion represented a hepatocellular adenoma with negative margins.
R Araujo, D Burgardt, V Vazquez, F Felippe, MA Sanctis, D Wohnrath
Surgical intervention
1 month ago
197 views
3 likes
0 comments
09:00
Laparoscopic central hepatectomy using a Glissonian approach for hepatocellular adenoma
A 32-year-old asymptomatic female patient presented an incidental finding of a liver mass during pregnancy. The mass grew during pregnancy, and a biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of hepatocellular adenoma. On MRI, a hypodense 7 by 6.1cm mass with adipose infiltration was identified. Previously, it was a 5.8 by 5.1cm mass, located in liver segments IV, V, and VIII inferiorly.
The cystic duct and its artery were ligated. However, the gallbladder was kept in place for traction. After dissection of the anterior pedicle, a linear stapler was applied. The right lobe was mobilized and the right transection line was made according to the ischemia line of the anterior sector.
During the liver transection of segment IVB, the pedicle was identified, and linear stapling helped to control it. The parenchymal transection was performed with an ultrasonic scalpel and bipolar cautery. The liver surface of the anterior sector was demarcated and transected. Both the left and the right plane of transection were inferiorly joined. The middle and right hepatic vein branches were stapled.
The specimen was mobilized. Argon beam and bipolar forceps provided the hemostasis. The specimen was removed via a Pfannenstiel’s incision and a drain was placed. The duration of the procedure was 345 minutes. The estimated blood loss was 1200mL.
The patient was discharged from the intensive care unit on postoperative day 1 and from hospital on postoperative day 4. No complication was noted in 90 days. Pathological findings showed a mass of 10.7 by 8.4 by 4.8cm. The lesion represented a hepatocellular adenoma with negative margins.
Laparoscopic partial liver resection for hepatocellular adenoma
We report a laparoscopic partial liver resection for a large hepatocellular adenoma. This is the case of a 34-year-old patient with several small hepatic nodules. One out of three nodules was a 13cm hepatocellular adenoma, which was found to be located in Couinaud’s segments V and VI. After clamping via blood flow occlusion, parenchymal transection was performed along the outer edge of the tumor using a Sonicision™ Cordless Ultrasonic Dissection Device and an Endo GIA™ linear stapler. After liver resection, cholecystectomy was performed. The postoperative outcome was uneventful. Final pathological findings confirmed the diagnosis of an inflammatory type of hepatocellular adenoma.
P Pessaux, T Urade, T Wakabayashi, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 month ago
670 views
2 likes
0 comments
05:51
Laparoscopic partial liver resection for hepatocellular adenoma
We report a laparoscopic partial liver resection for a large hepatocellular adenoma. This is the case of a 34-year-old patient with several small hepatic nodules. One out of three nodules was a 13cm hepatocellular adenoma, which was found to be located in Couinaud’s segments V and VI. After clamping via blood flow occlusion, parenchymal transection was performed along the outer edge of the tumor using a Sonicision™ Cordless Ultrasonic Dissection Device and an Endo GIA™ linear stapler. After liver resection, cholecystectomy was performed. The postoperative outcome was uneventful. Final pathological findings confirmed the diagnosis of an inflammatory type of hepatocellular adenoma.
Complicated laparoscopic cholecystectomy with bile leak: management strategy
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy may be rendered particularly complicated due to several conditions such as hepatomegaly or an advanced inflammatory state. Technical difficulties may be accountable for intraoperative complications, such as biliary leakage although surgeons comply with well-established safety guidelines such as the "critical view of safety" prior to the division of pedicular structures.
This is the case of a morbidly obese 69-year-old male patient who was operated on three months after an episode of cholangitis medically treated and managed with ERCP and endoscopic sphincterotomy with a favorable evolution.
During laparoscopic cholecystectomy, the cystic pedicle presents an inflammatory aspect, making the exposure and the surgical procedure particularly uneasy to perform in this obese patient.
During dissection, bile leakage was evidenced.
This video shows a therapeutic strategy to handle such a case, with the initial objective of preventing any common bile duct injury.
P Pessaux, G Philouze, D Mutter, J Marescaux, JB Bertin, S Osailan
Surgical intervention
1 month ago
689 views
4 likes
4 comments
10:28
Complicated laparoscopic cholecystectomy with bile leak: management strategy
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy may be rendered particularly complicated due to several conditions such as hepatomegaly or an advanced inflammatory state. Technical difficulties may be accountable for intraoperative complications, such as biliary leakage although surgeons comply with well-established safety guidelines such as the "critical view of safety" prior to the division of pedicular structures.
This is the case of a morbidly obese 69-year-old male patient who was operated on three months after an episode of cholangitis medically treated and managed with ERCP and endoscopic sphincterotomy with a favorable evolution.
During laparoscopic cholecystectomy, the cystic pedicle presents an inflammatory aspect, making the exposure and the surgical procedure particularly uneasy to perform in this obese patient.
During dissection, bile leakage was evidenced.
This video shows a therapeutic strategy to handle such a case, with the initial objective of preventing any common bile duct injury.
Minimal access surgery approach to benign biliary disease
The laparoscopic biliary approach for benign diseases has been discussed for a quarter of a century. However, there were few articles in the literature about laparoscopic bilioenteric anastomoses, such as choledochoduodenostomy and hepatico/choledochojejunostomy which require advanced laparoscopic skills and experience. In this key lecture, Dr. Asbun demonstrates his own laparoscopic techniques for bilioenteric anastomoses. For choledochal cysts representative of benign biliary diseases, cyst excision is required. The difficulty lies in the fact that the cyst extends towards the intrapancreatic portion. Dr. Asbun demonstrates the techniques for complete exposure of the intrapancreatic bile duct portion in such cases. Finally, Dr. Asbun shows bile duct injury cases managed using a hepaticojejunostomy.
HJ Asbun
Lecture
1 month ago
276 views
1 like
1 comment
24:34
Minimal access surgery approach to benign biliary disease
The laparoscopic biliary approach for benign diseases has been discussed for a quarter of a century. However, there were few articles in the literature about laparoscopic bilioenteric anastomoses, such as choledochoduodenostomy and hepatico/choledochojejunostomy which require advanced laparoscopic skills and experience. In this key lecture, Dr. Asbun demonstrates his own laparoscopic techniques for bilioenteric anastomoses. For choledochal cysts representative of benign biliary diseases, cyst excision is required. The difficulty lies in the fact that the cyst extends towards the intrapancreatic portion. Dr. Asbun demonstrates the techniques for complete exposure of the intrapancreatic bile duct portion in such cases. Finally, Dr. Asbun shows bile duct injury cases managed using a hepaticojejunostomy.
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy - Basic rules - Bile duct injury
There is twice as much risk of incidental biliary injuries in laparoscopic cholecystectomy than in open cholecystectomy.
About half of surgeons will cause a bile duct injury during their careers. In this lecture, Dr. Dallemagne provides key national data of bile duct injury and explains that the lack of surgical experience or visual misperception leads to an increase in the rate of incidental injuries, mentioning his own cases. Dr. Dallemagne also outlines the fundamental techniques to prevent injuries and use bailout procedures (partial and subtotal cholecystectomy) in laparoscopic cholecystectomy, according to the latest version of the Tokyo guidelines.
B Dallemagne
Lecture
1 month ago
1127 views
11 likes
0 comments
22:02
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy - Basic rules - Bile duct injury
There is twice as much risk of incidental biliary injuries in laparoscopic cholecystectomy than in open cholecystectomy.
About half of surgeons will cause a bile duct injury during their careers. In this lecture, Dr. Dallemagne provides key national data of bile duct injury and explains that the lack of surgical experience or visual misperception leads to an increase in the rate of incidental injuries, mentioning his own cases. Dr. Dallemagne also outlines the fundamental techniques to prevent injuries and use bailout procedures (partial and subtotal cholecystectomy) in laparoscopic cholecystectomy, according to the latest version of the Tokyo guidelines.
Bile duct injury: what to do?
In this key lecture, Dr. Soubrane outlines the various types of bile duct injuries and demonstrates how to manage them, classifying them into bile duct injuries during or after index surgery. When injuries are detected during index surgery, surgeons either have to add stitches combined with drainage in case of minor injuries or create an anastomosis in case of complete common bile duct division. When injuries are detected after index surgery, surgeons may either solve them with endoscopic stenting in case of minor injuries or have to wait at least 2 months in case of complete common bile duct division. As an example of major liver resection for severe bile duct injuries, Dr. Soubrane also shows a case of right liver resection for severe bile duct injury with concomitant arterial interruption and massive portal vein thrombosis after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.
O Soubrane
Lecture
1 month ago
650 views
6 likes
0 comments
31:48
Bile duct injury: what to do?
In this key lecture, Dr. Soubrane outlines the various types of bile duct injuries and demonstrates how to manage them, classifying them into bile duct injuries during or after index surgery. When injuries are detected during index surgery, surgeons either have to add stitches combined with drainage in case of minor injuries or create an anastomosis in case of complete common bile duct division. When injuries are detected after index surgery, surgeons may either solve them with endoscopic stenting in case of minor injuries or have to wait at least 2 months in case of complete common bile duct division. As an example of major liver resection for severe bile duct injuries, Dr. Soubrane also shows a case of right liver resection for severe bile duct injury with concomitant arterial interruption and massive portal vein thrombosis after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.
Laparoscopic management of perforated ulcer of the stomach
A 43-year-old woman with a history of chronic use of NSAIDs was admitted to the emergency care unit for acute abdominal epigastric pain. CT-scan showed both free air and fluid in the peritoneal cavity with marked thickening and irregularity at the level of the gastric antrum and the duodenal bulb. The patient underwent emergency laparoscopy. A large amount of purulent fluid was found in the peritoneal cavity and evacuated. The gastric defect was identified at the level of the anterior wall of the gastric antrum. A 2/0 Vicryl suture is used to oversew the perforation. As an additional protection, an omental patch was brought in place and fixed against the sutured lesion. Abundant peritoneal lavage was performed. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 5. One month later, esophagogastroduodenoscopies (EGDs) with biopsies of the ulcer’s margins were performed.
X Untereiner, M Pizzicannella, B Dallemagne, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
2 months ago
4073 views
11 likes
4 comments
06:55
Laparoscopic management of perforated ulcer of the stomach
A 43-year-old woman with a history of chronic use of NSAIDs was admitted to the emergency care unit for acute abdominal epigastric pain. CT-scan showed both free air and fluid in the peritoneal cavity with marked thickening and irregularity at the level of the gastric antrum and the duodenal bulb. The patient underwent emergency laparoscopy. A large amount of purulent fluid was found in the peritoneal cavity and evacuated. The gastric defect was identified at the level of the anterior wall of the gastric antrum. A 2/0 Vicryl suture is used to oversew the perforation. As an additional protection, an omental patch was brought in place and fixed against the sutured lesion. Abundant peritoneal lavage was performed. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 5. One month later, esophagogastroduodenoscopies (EGDs) with biopsies of the ulcer’s margins were performed.
Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) for rectal cancer with transabdominal and transrectal ICG-guided sentinel node
Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) for rectal cancer is gaining interest, with the objective of maximum sparing for physiological functions. Although this approach may be considered appropriate for treating stage T1m tumors, a large proportion of T1sm and T2 tumors could well benefit from this. The greatest limitation to the application of TAMIS is represented by the difficulty of obtaining an adequate lymph node sample of the mesorectum. The use of indocyanine green (ICG) has recently been suggested as a possible lymph node marker after peritumoral injection. The case described in this video presents an innovative proposal for the detection and removal of lymph nodes draining a tumor of the lower rectum, with the aim of obtaining an adequate lymph node staging. After endoscopic peritumoral ICG injection, we proceeded to the search and removal of sentinel lymph nodes both with a laparoscopic transabdominal approach and with a transrectal approach (after specimen removal). If validated in a prospective series, this technique could represent the best lymph node harvesting strategy during TAMIS for early stage rectal cancer.
G Baiocchi, R Nascimbeni, N Vettoretto, N de Manzini, M Morino
Surgical intervention
2 months ago
1229 views
3 likes
1 comment
09:24
Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) for rectal cancer with transabdominal and transrectal ICG-guided sentinel node
Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) for rectal cancer is gaining interest, with the objective of maximum sparing for physiological functions. Although this approach may be considered appropriate for treating stage T1m tumors, a large proportion of T1sm and T2 tumors could well benefit from this. The greatest limitation to the application of TAMIS is represented by the difficulty of obtaining an adequate lymph node sample of the mesorectum. The use of indocyanine green (ICG) has recently been suggested as a possible lymph node marker after peritumoral injection. The case described in this video presents an innovative proposal for the detection and removal of lymph nodes draining a tumor of the lower rectum, with the aim of obtaining an adequate lymph node staging. After endoscopic peritumoral ICG injection, we proceeded to the search and removal of sentinel lymph nodes both with a laparoscopic transabdominal approach and with a transrectal approach (after specimen removal). If validated in a prospective series, this technique could represent the best lymph node harvesting strategy during TAMIS for early stage rectal cancer.
Laparoscopic management of small bowel obstruction and ileo-ileal intussusception
Meckel’s diverticulum is the most common congenital anomaly of the digestive tract, found in 2 to 3% of the population. It is usually detected in children. In adults, symptoms vary, and diagnosis is therefore uneasy to establish. The most common infectious complications include obstructions and bleedings, which account for approximately one third of overall complications. Obstructions may be caused by intussusception or by a band.
This video demonstrates a case of a 49-year-old male patient, who necessitated an emergency surgical procedure for the management of a small bowel obstruction induced by the presence of Meckel’s diverticulum and intussusception. Due to an underlying necrosis, a resection and an anastomosis of the small bowel were performed.
D Kadoche, M Ignat, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
2 months ago
425 views
2 likes
0 comments
08:22
Laparoscopic management of small bowel obstruction and ileo-ileal intussusception
Meckel’s diverticulum is the most common congenital anomaly of the digestive tract, found in 2 to 3% of the population. It is usually detected in children. In adults, symptoms vary, and diagnosis is therefore uneasy to establish. The most common infectious complications include obstructions and bleedings, which account for approximately one third of overall complications. Obstructions may be caused by intussusception or by a band.
This video demonstrates a case of a 49-year-old male patient, who necessitated an emergency surgical procedure for the management of a small bowel obstruction induced by the presence of Meckel’s diverticulum and intussusception. Due to an underlying necrosis, a resection and an anastomosis of the small bowel were performed.
Left iliac fossa incisional hernia: live laparoscopic repair
Dr. Salvador Morales-Conde presents the clinical case of a 59-year old female patient managed for an incisional hernia with a 6-7cm sac in the left lower quadrant. The patient’s history included a left iliac fossa laparotomy to control bleeding caused by an epigastric artery injury following a laparoscopic appendectomy. The patient was placed in a Trendelenburg position. An optical port and two 5mm operating ports were inserted on the right lateral side of the abdomen. Peritoneal dissection was performed to expose anatomical landmarks including pubic bone, iliac crest, and iliac vessels for proper mesh fixation. The defect of the abdominal wall was closed using a continuous suture. A trimmed mesh (Parietex™ Composite Mesh) was inserted and fixed with tackers to Cooper’s ligament, to the iliac crest, and to the abdominal wall to sufficiently cover the sutured defect. Finally, the preperitoneal flap was fixed on the mesh to prevent intestines from getting into the mesh gap.
S Morales-Conde, T Urade, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
2 months ago
3346 views
14 likes
4 comments
42:53
Left iliac fossa incisional hernia: live laparoscopic repair
Dr. Salvador Morales-Conde presents the clinical case of a 59-year old female patient managed for an incisional hernia with a 6-7cm sac in the left lower quadrant. The patient’s history included a left iliac fossa laparotomy to control bleeding caused by an epigastric artery injury following a laparoscopic appendectomy. The patient was placed in a Trendelenburg position. An optical port and two 5mm operating ports were inserted on the right lateral side of the abdomen. Peritoneal dissection was performed to expose anatomical landmarks including pubic bone, iliac crest, and iliac vessels for proper mesh fixation. The defect of the abdominal wall was closed using a continuous suture. A trimmed mesh (Parietex™ Composite Mesh) was inserted and fixed with tackers to Cooper’s ligament, to the iliac crest, and to the abdominal wall to sufficiently cover the sutured defect. Finally, the preperitoneal flap was fixed on the mesh to prevent intestines from getting into the mesh gap.
Laparoscopic TAPP approach to bilateral reducible inguinal hernia: live interactive procedure
We present the clinical case of a 57-year old male patient managed for a bilateral reducible inguinal hernia. The patient’s history included a right inguinal hernia repair in his childhood. A first port was inserted 1cm above the umbilicus and two 5mm ports were placed 7cm away from the umbilicus on the right and left side. Peritoneal dissection starts with a horizontal incision and parietalization is performed carefully to avoid injury to the vessels and deferent duct. After the myopectineal orifice has been sufficiently exposed, polypropylene meshes (Parietene™) trimmed to a 13 by 12cm size are inserted into the preperitoneal cavity and fixed using absorbable tacks. Finally, the meshes are fully covered using peritoneal flaps.
D Mutter, T Urade, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
2 months ago
4292 views
32 likes
4 comments
46:18
Laparoscopic TAPP approach to bilateral reducible inguinal hernia: live interactive procedure
We present the clinical case of a 57-year old male patient managed for a bilateral reducible inguinal hernia. The patient’s history included a right inguinal hernia repair in his childhood. A first port was inserted 1cm above the umbilicus and two 5mm ports were placed 7cm away from the umbilicus on the right and left side. Peritoneal dissection starts with a horizontal incision and parietalization is performed carefully to avoid injury to the vessels and deferent duct. After the myopectineal orifice has been sufficiently exposed, polypropylene meshes (Parietene™) trimmed to a 13 by 12cm size are inserted into the preperitoneal cavity and fixed using absorbable tacks. Finally, the meshes are fully covered using peritoneal flaps.
Laparoscopic TEP unilateral inguinal hernia repair: a live interactive procedure
We present the clinical case of a 45-year old male patient managed for a right direct inguinal hernia. The patient’s history included a former approach for right inguinal hernia in his childhood and a laparoscopic left inguinal hernia repair. A first port was inserted below the umbilicus and access to the pubic bone was gained on the midline without using balloon. In this case, dissection of adhesions related to the previous operation was required. Attempts were made to identify anatomical landmarks after insertion of 5mm ports. The direct hernia content was dissected and reduced with blunt dissection. Once anatomical landmarks including pubic symphysis, Cooper’s ligament, epigastric vessels, spermatic cord, and psoas muscle were identified, a trimmed polypropylene mesh was inserted and the myopectineal orifice was sufficiently covered without fixation. Finally, the preperitoneal cavity was desufflated to complete the procedure.
B Dallemagne, T Urade, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
2 months ago
977 views
13 likes
1 comment
39:46
Laparoscopic TEP unilateral inguinal hernia repair: a live interactive procedure
We present the clinical case of a 45-year old male patient managed for a right direct inguinal hernia. The patient’s history included a former approach for right inguinal hernia in his childhood and a laparoscopic left inguinal hernia repair. A first port was inserted below the umbilicus and access to the pubic bone was gained on the midline without using balloon. In this case, dissection of adhesions related to the previous operation was required. Attempts were made to identify anatomical landmarks after insertion of 5mm ports. The direct hernia content was dissected and reduced with blunt dissection. Once anatomical landmarks including pubic symphysis, Cooper’s ligament, epigastric vessels, spermatic cord, and psoas muscle were identified, a trimmed polypropylene mesh was inserted and the myopectineal orifice was sufficiently covered without fixation. Finally, the preperitoneal cavity was desufflated to complete the procedure.
Laparoscopic Spigelian hernia repair
Spigelian hernia is a rare condition and it is difficult to diagnose it clinically. It has been estimated to account for 0.12% of abdominal wall hernias. The hernia ring is a well-defined defect in the transversus abdominis aponeurosis. The hernia sac, surrounded with extraperitoneal adipose tissue, often lies interparietally passing through the transversus abdominis and the internal oblique muscle aponeuroses and then spreading out beneath the intact aponeurosis of the external oblique muscle. The laparoscopic repair is well-established. Most authors use a transperitoneal approach either by placing the mesh in an intraperitoneal position or by raising the peritoneal flap and placing the mesh in the extraperitoneal space. In this video, we demonstrate the laparoscopic repair of a Spigelian hernia through the transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) placement of a composite mesh.
A D'Urso, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
2 months ago
1290 views
6 likes
0 comments
08:23
Laparoscopic Spigelian hernia repair
Spigelian hernia is a rare condition and it is difficult to diagnose it clinically. It has been estimated to account for 0.12% of abdominal wall hernias. The hernia ring is a well-defined defect in the transversus abdominis aponeurosis. The hernia sac, surrounded with extraperitoneal adipose tissue, often lies interparietally passing through the transversus abdominis and the internal oblique muscle aponeuroses and then spreading out beneath the intact aponeurosis of the external oblique muscle. The laparoscopic repair is well-established. Most authors use a transperitoneal approach either by placing the mesh in an intraperitoneal position or by raising the peritoneal flap and placing the mesh in the extraperitoneal space. In this video, we demonstrate the laparoscopic repair of a Spigelian hernia through the transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) placement of a composite mesh.
ICG fluorescent cholangiography in difficult laparoscopic cholecystectomy with inflammatory biliary fusion post-cholecystitis and pancreatitis
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the presence of inflammatory billiary fusion is a technically challenging procedure associated with a 0.5% risk of injury to major extrahepatic bile ducts.
Preoperative planning and intraoperative visualization of the anatomy of the biliary tree using an intraoperative cholangiogram reduces the risk or the severity of injury to major biliary ducts.
Indocyanine green cholangiography has emerged as a promising non-invasive modality for visualization of extra-hepatic biliary ducts, having the advantage of very easy use repetitively at various stages of critical areas of dissection.
This video demonstrates a laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a patient who had an emergency admission for mild acute cholecystitis (as per Tokyo guidelines, 2018) and concomitant moderately severe acute gallstone pancreatitis (revised Atlanta classification) with a preoperative MRCP predictive of biliary inflammatory fusion between the gallbladder neck and the common hepatic duct.
Consequently, we planned and performed a laparoscopic cholecystectomy with an indocyanine green cholangiogram as a non-invasive method to help identify the intraoperative anatomy of the extra-hepatic biliary ducts.
The main feature of our video is the use of indocyanine green during the difficult dissection of the gallbladder neck and exposure of the critical view of safety in Calot’s triangle as cased with clear features of significant biliary inflammatory fusion between the cystic duct and the common hepatic duct.
ICG fluorescent demonstration of the extra-hepatic biliary tree is used in real time and with ease repeatedly at several stages of this difficult dissection, facilitating a safe completion of a difficult laparoscopic cholecystectomy and may become a standard practice.
G Kumar, S Ramachandran, M Paraoan
Surgical intervention
2 months ago
166 views
3 likes
0 comments
13:21
ICG fluorescent cholangiography in difficult laparoscopic cholecystectomy with inflammatory biliary fusion post-cholecystitis and pancreatitis
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the presence of inflammatory billiary fusion is a technically challenging procedure associated with a 0.5% risk of injury to major extrahepatic bile ducts.
Preoperative planning and intraoperative visualization of the anatomy of the biliary tree using an intraoperative cholangiogram reduces the risk or the severity of injury to major biliary ducts.
Indocyanine green cholangiography has emerged as a promising non-invasive modality for visualization of extra-hepatic biliary ducts, having the advantage of very easy use repetitively at various stages of critical areas of dissection.
This video demonstrates a laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a patient who had an emergency admission for mild acute cholecystitis (as per Tokyo guidelines, 2018) and concomitant moderately severe acute gallstone pancreatitis (revised Atlanta classification) with a preoperative MRCP predictive of biliary inflammatory fusion between the gallbladder neck and the common hepatic duct.
Consequently, we planned and performed a laparoscopic cholecystectomy with an indocyanine green cholangiogram as a non-invasive method to help identify the intraoperative anatomy of the extra-hepatic biliary ducts.
The main feature of our video is the use of indocyanine green during the difficult dissection of the gallbladder neck and exposure of the critical view of safety in Calot’s triangle as cased with clear features of significant biliary inflammatory fusion between the cystic duct and the common hepatic duct.
ICG fluorescent demonstration of the extra-hepatic biliary tree is used in real time and with ease repeatedly at several stages of this difficult dissection, facilitating a safe completion of a difficult laparoscopic cholecystectomy and may become a standard practice.
Laparoscopic treatment of primary omental infarction
A 53-year-old man was admitted to the emergency department for right hypochondrium pain, fever, and weight loss, with clinical evidence of an abdominal mass in his right lumbar region.
His white blood cell (WBC) count was 11.9x109/L and his C-reactive protein value was 11.7mg/dL.
His abdominal CT-scan and MRI showed a 12.5cm omental mass, suggestive of omental infarction with a hemorrhagic component. His gastroscopy and colonoscopy were negative, and the needle biopsy of the mass was not suggestive of malignancy. Exploratory laparoscopy with biopsy or resection of the omental lesion was indicated. The total duration of the operation was 1 hour, and the omental mass was resected. The patient completely recovered from his symptoms, and was discharged after two days. Final histology of his lesion demonstrated an omental infarction with thrombosis, hemorrhage, and fat cell necrosis.
M Lotti, M Marini, M Giulii Capponi
Surgical intervention
2 months ago
1693 views
5 likes
5 comments
14:43
Laparoscopic treatment of primary omental infarction
A 53-year-old man was admitted to the emergency department for right hypochondrium pain, fever, and weight loss, with clinical evidence of an abdominal mass in his right lumbar region.
His white blood cell (WBC) count was 11.9x109/L and his C-reactive protein value was 11.7mg/dL.
His abdominal CT-scan and MRI showed a 12.5cm omental mass, suggestive of omental infarction with a hemorrhagic component. His gastroscopy and colonoscopy were negative, and the needle biopsy of the mass was not suggestive of malignancy. Exploratory laparoscopy with biopsy or resection of the omental lesion was indicated. The total duration of the operation was 1 hour, and the omental mass was resected. The patient completely recovered from his symptoms, and was discharged after two days. Final histology of his lesion demonstrated an omental infarction with thrombosis, hemorrhage, and fat cell necrosis.
Pancreatic duplication associated with a gastric duplication cyst: laparoscopic approach
This video shows the case of a 48-year-old male patient with a history of epigastric pain for 20 days, with the presence of nausea and vomiting but no self-reported fever. The patient was presented at the ER for examination. Computerized tomography (CT) scanning revealed a very rare case of pancreatic duplication associated with a gastric duplication cyst. He was referred to our service and then treated by laparoscopic route with partial gastrectomy and pancreatic resection (pancreas horn). On the 2nd postoperative day, the patient was discharged and allowed for free oral feeding. This is the second study in the literature reporting a case of laparoscopic resection of a gastric duplication cyst together with pancreatic resection. Of note, this is the first study in which the accessory pancreas communicates with the pancreatic head.
F Freire Lisboa Junior, R de Lima França, A de Araujo Lima Liguori, AC de Medeiros Junior, M HSMP Tavares, F Medeiros de Azevedo, D Myller Barros Lima
Surgical intervention
2 months ago
1036 views
4 likes
0 comments
14:36
Pancreatic duplication associated with a gastric duplication cyst: laparoscopic approach
This video shows the case of a 48-year-old male patient with a history of epigastric pain for 20 days, with the presence of nausea and vomiting but no self-reported fever. The patient was presented at the ER for examination. Computerized tomography (CT) scanning revealed a very rare case of pancreatic duplication associated with a gastric duplication cyst. He was referred to our service and then treated by laparoscopic route with partial gastrectomy and pancreatic resection (pancreas horn). On the 2nd postoperative day, the patient was discharged and allowed for free oral feeding. This is the second study in the literature reporting a case of laparoscopic resection of a gastric duplication cyst together with pancreatic resection. Of note, this is the first study in which the accessory pancreas communicates with the pancreatic head.
Laparoscopic excision of urachal cyst - a minimally invasive approach of a rare cause of abdominal pain in adults
Congenital abnormalities of the urachus are rare, with an incidence of 2:300000 children and 1:5000 adults. The urachus is a fibrous remnant of the allantois, usually occluded in the 4-5th gestational months, with the descent of the bladder towards the pelvis. It lies in the space of Retzius, between the transverse fascia anteriorly and the peritoneum posteriorly. The absence of its obliteration can result in an urachal cyst in 36% of cases. The main complication of the cyst is focal infection with associated risks of rupture and intestinal involvement. Diagnosis relies on clinical history, abdominopelvic ultrasonography and CT-scan. The treatment consists in complete excision of abnormal tissue and a small portion of adjacent bladder wall, therefore reducing the risk of malignant degeneration of the entire remnant.
A twenty-year-old healthy woman was referred to the emergency department with localized discomfort and a foul smelling purulent discharge from the umbilicus with three days of evolution. The patient was afebrile with periumbilical inflammatory signs, without signs of peritoneal irritation on physical exam. Blood tests were all normal, apart from a raised C-reactive protein (2.52mg/dL). Abdominal ultrasound was suggestive of an infected urachal cyst with umbilical fistulization. Empirical treatment with antibiotics was started and an abdominopelvic CT-scan, made as outpatient surgery, showed a probable 26mm urachal cyst, posterior and adjacent to the umbilicus, without bladder attachment.
The patient was treated surgically with a laparoscopic excision of the remainder of the urachus, without intraoperative complications. A good clinical evolution was observed during the hospital stay, and the patient was discharged on the fourth postoperative day. On follow-up, the patient did not complain of anything.
This clinical case emphasizes the importance of the high index of diagnostic suspicion in the management and treatment of the rare causes of abdominal pain, often with the possibility of a minimally invasive approach.
A Tojal, AR Loureiro, B Prata, R Patrão, N Carrilho, C Casimiro
Surgical intervention
2 months ago
829 views
3 likes
1 comment
10:34
Laparoscopic excision of urachal cyst - a minimally invasive approach of a rare cause of abdominal pain in adults
Congenital abnormalities of the urachus are rare, with an incidence of 2:300000 children and 1:5000 adults. The urachus is a fibrous remnant of the allantois, usually occluded in the 4-5th gestational months, with the descent of the bladder towards the pelvis. It lies in the space of Retzius, between the transverse fascia anteriorly and the peritoneum posteriorly. The absence of its obliteration can result in an urachal cyst in 36% of cases. The main complication of the cyst is focal infection with associated risks of rupture and intestinal involvement. Diagnosis relies on clinical history, abdominopelvic ultrasonography and CT-scan. The treatment consists in complete excision of abnormal tissue and a small portion of adjacent bladder wall, therefore reducing the risk of malignant degeneration of the entire remnant.
A twenty-year-old healthy woman was referred to the emergency department with localized discomfort and a foul smelling purulent discharge from the umbilicus with three days of evolution. The patient was afebrile with periumbilical inflammatory signs, without signs of peritoneal irritation on physical exam. Blood tests were all normal, apart from a raised C-reactive protein (2.52mg/dL). Abdominal ultrasound was suggestive of an infected urachal cyst with umbilical fistulization. Empirical treatment with antibiotics was started and an abdominopelvic CT-scan, made as outpatient surgery, showed a probable 26mm urachal cyst, posterior and adjacent to the umbilicus, without bladder attachment.
The patient was treated surgically with a laparoscopic excision of the remainder of the urachus, without intraoperative complications. A good clinical evolution was observed during the hospital stay, and the patient was discharged on the fourth postoperative day. On follow-up, the patient did not complain of anything.
This clinical case emphasizes the importance of the high index of diagnostic suspicion in the management and treatment of the rare causes of abdominal pain, often with the possibility of a minimally invasive approach.
Laparoscopic total gastrectomy
A multimodality approach remains the only potential treatment for advanced gastric cancer. Oncological outcomes seem to be equivalent either in open surgery or in minimally invasive surgery. Therefore, laparoscopic gastric resection is expanding in expert centers.
The authors present a clinical case of a 70-year-old woman with no relevant clinical past. She presented with a 1-month complaint of epigastric pain and melena. She underwent an upper endoscopy, which showed an ulcerated gastric lesion at the lesser curvature. Biopsy revealed a poorly cohesive gastric carcinoma with signet ring cells. Thoraco-abdominal-pelvic CT-scan revealed a thickening of the gastric wall associated with multiple perigastric and celiac trunk lymph nodes. She was proposed for perioperative chemotherapy. On the restaging CT-scan, there was no evidence of disease progression and therefore she underwent a laparoscopic radical total gastrectomy.
The benefits of minimally invasive surgery, combined with the increasing evidence of oncological results overlapping with open surgery, have contributed to the progressive implementation of laparoscopic surgery in the treatment of malignant gastric pathology.
J Magalhães, C Osorio, L Frutuoso, AM Pereira, A Trovão, R Ferreira de Almeida, M Nora
Surgical intervention
2 months ago
2243 views
11 likes
3 comments
09:44
Laparoscopic total gastrectomy
A multimodality approach remains the only potential treatment for advanced gastric cancer. Oncological outcomes seem to be equivalent either in open surgery or in minimally invasive surgery. Therefore, laparoscopic gastric resection is expanding in expert centers.
The authors present a clinical case of a 70-year-old woman with no relevant clinical past. She presented with a 1-month complaint of epigastric pain and melena. She underwent an upper endoscopy, which showed an ulcerated gastric lesion at the lesser curvature. Biopsy revealed a poorly cohesive gastric carcinoma with signet ring cells. Thoraco-abdominal-pelvic CT-scan revealed a thickening of the gastric wall associated with multiple perigastric and celiac trunk lymph nodes. She was proposed for perioperative chemotherapy. On the restaging CT-scan, there was no evidence of disease progression and therefore she underwent a laparoscopic radical total gastrectomy.
The benefits of minimally invasive surgery, combined with the increasing evidence of oncological results overlapping with open surgery, have contributed to the progressive implementation of laparoscopic surgery in the treatment of malignant gastric pathology.
Laparoscopic distal splenopancreatectomy for pancreatic cystadenoma: clockwise technique assisted with T’Lift device
Serous cystic neoplasm is a cystic neoplasm of the pancreas, which is increasingly detected at an asymptomatic stage. Serous cystadenomas are benign cystic tumors which occur more often in women than in men, and particularly in the seventh decade of life. Despite this, in the literature, three patients were reported to have malignant serous cystadenomas, with sizes greater than 7cm. The serous cystic neoplasm was confirmed by an imaging characteristic appearance, with multiple small or different-sized cysts, but when the diagnosis is doubtful, which often leads to surgery.
The clinical case is the one of a 79-year-old woman with a cystadenoma of the pancreas. She had a history of partial cystectomy for bladder neoplasia and recently (in 2017), she was submitted to laparoscopic focal cryotherapy for the treatment of a left unilateral renal tumor. At that time, she underwent a CT-can, which found a cystic neoplasm of the tail of the pancreas. A heterogeneous 5cm lesion appeared in the left hypochondrium, near the lower pole of the spleen, with no evidence of adenopathies highly suggestive of a serous cystadenoma of the pancreas.
In October 2018, in a follow-up CT-scan, there was an increase in size of the lesion (6.6cm) and a surgical resection was planned. A distal splenopancreatectomy using a clockwise technique was performed using the Signia™ stapling system with no complications. Histological examination confirmed a serous cystadenoma of the pancreas.
M Rui Martins, J Correia, D Jordão, S Martins, H Ferrão
Surgical intervention
2 months ago
844 views
4 likes
0 comments
20:59
Laparoscopic distal splenopancreatectomy for pancreatic cystadenoma: clockwise technique assisted with T’Lift device
Serous cystic neoplasm is a cystic neoplasm of the pancreas, which is increasingly detected at an asymptomatic stage. Serous cystadenomas are benign cystic tumors which occur more often in women than in men, and particularly in the seventh decade of life. Despite this, in the literature, three patients were reported to have malignant serous cystadenomas, with sizes greater than 7cm. The serous cystic neoplasm was confirmed by an imaging characteristic appearance, with multiple small or different-sized cysts, but when the diagnosis is doubtful, which often leads to surgery.
The clinical case is the one of a 79-year-old woman with a cystadenoma of the pancreas. She had a history of partial cystectomy for bladder neoplasia and recently (in 2017), she was submitted to laparoscopic focal cryotherapy for the treatment of a left unilateral renal tumor. At that time, she underwent a CT-can, which found a cystic neoplasm of the tail of the pancreas. A heterogeneous 5cm lesion appeared in the left hypochondrium, near the lower pole of the spleen, with no evidence of adenopathies highly suggestive of a serous cystadenoma of the pancreas.
In October 2018, in a follow-up CT-scan, there was an increase in size of the lesion (6.6cm) and a surgical resection was planned. A distal splenopancreatectomy using a clockwise technique was performed using the Signia™ stapling system with no complications. Histological examination confirmed a serous cystadenoma of the pancreas.
Wilkie's syndrome surgery
Wilkie’s syndrome (or superior mesenteric artery syndrome) was first described by Von Rokitansky in 1861. It consists in an extrinsic pressure over the third duodenal portion originating from an uncertain cause. Wilkie found a decreased angle (25 degrees, or less) between the superior mesenteric artery and the aorta, conditioning a duodenal (3rd portion) obstruction of vascular origin. It is associated with weight loss. The real incidence remains unknown due to the lack of diagnosis. However, the estimated incidence varies between 0.013 to 1% of the population. The male/female ratio is 2:3, ranging age between 10 and 39 years old.
Symptoms include postprandial abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, weight loss, early gastric fullness and anorexia (acute high gastroduodenal obstruction).
Diagnostic studies include barium esophageal gastroduodenal series, CT-scan, MRI, high endoscopy (peptic esophagitis, ulcer). Endoscopic studies must come together with barium esophageal gastroduodenal X-ray studies.
Surgical treatment is performed when there is no response to medical treatment, consisting in duodenojejunal anastomoses, with Treitz’s ligament division. Gastrojejunal anastomosis is an alternative option. Laparoscopic surgical treatment can be performed.
G Lozano Dubernard, R Gil-Ortiz Mejía, B Rueda Torres
Surgical intervention
2 months ago
986 views
5 likes
1 comment
13:16
Wilkie's syndrome surgery
Wilkie’s syndrome (or superior mesenteric artery syndrome) was first described by Von Rokitansky in 1861. It consists in an extrinsic pressure over the third duodenal portion originating from an uncertain cause. Wilkie found a decreased angle (25 degrees, or less) between the superior mesenteric artery and the aorta, conditioning a duodenal (3rd portion) obstruction of vascular origin. It is associated with weight loss. The real incidence remains unknown due to the lack of diagnosis. However, the estimated incidence varies between 0.013 to 1% of the population. The male/female ratio is 2:3, ranging age between 10 and 39 years old.
Symptoms include postprandial abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, weight loss, early gastric fullness and anorexia (acute high gastroduodenal obstruction).
Diagnostic studies include barium esophageal gastroduodenal series, CT-scan, MRI, high endoscopy (peptic esophagitis, ulcer). Endoscopic studies must come together with barium esophageal gastroduodenal X-ray studies.
Surgical treatment is performed when there is no response to medical treatment, consisting in duodenojejunal anastomoses, with Treitz’s ligament division. Gastrojejunal anastomosis is an alternative option. Laparoscopic surgical treatment can be performed.
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy: cystic duct stone management
This video demonstrates a laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a 69-year-old woman who had multiple episodes of biliary colic. Ultrasonography and MRI showed the presence of multiple gallbladder stones. MRI also showed a folded gallbladder infundibulum over the cystic duct, which is enlarged and contains a stone. The common bile duct is otherwise perfectly thin and free of stones. In this video, one can observe a stepwise cholecystectomy technique, with exposure, dissection of the serosa and of Calot’s triangle. Cystic artery division is first performed in order to allow complete cystic duct dissection obtaining the critical view of safety. The dissection of the dilated cystic duct is thoroughly demonstrated. A small stone is pushed back into the gallbladder; the cystic duct is opened and checked for residual stones, and the cystic duct convergence with the common bile duct is evidenced prior to clip positioning and duct division.
M Ignat, M Wehr, B Seeliger, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
4 months ago
2751 views
10 likes
2 comments
10:44
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy: cystic duct stone management
This video demonstrates a laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a 69-year-old woman who had multiple episodes of biliary colic. Ultrasonography and MRI showed the presence of multiple gallbladder stones. MRI also showed a folded gallbladder infundibulum over the cystic duct, which is enlarged and contains a stone. The common bile duct is otherwise perfectly thin and free of stones. In this video, one can observe a stepwise cholecystectomy technique, with exposure, dissection of the serosa and of Calot’s triangle. Cystic artery division is first performed in order to allow complete cystic duct dissection obtaining the critical view of safety. The dissection of the dilated cystic duct is thoroughly demonstrated. A small stone is pushed back into the gallbladder; the cystic duct is opened and checked for residual stones, and the cystic duct convergence with the common bile duct is evidenced prior to clip positioning and duct division.
Laparoscopic revision of Nissen fundoplication to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass
Introduction: Obesity is a known etiological factor for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and is also a growing public health concern. Although Nissen fundoplication is a highly effective technique to treat GERD, it may fail in obese patients. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass provides excellent long-term control of GERD symptoms with the additional benefit of weight loss.
Clinical case: A 57-year-old woman underwent a laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication for GERD (BMI 30.0 Kg/m2) with excellent outcomes during the first postoperative year in 2011. Two years later, GERD symptoms recurred, and her weight increased progressively (BMI of 36.0 Kg/m2). The patient was proposed to a laparoscopic conversion of Nissen fundoplication to a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. The procedure was uneventful, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 4. One year later, she remained asymptomatic, off antacids medication, and with her weight decreased to 63.5Kg which corresponded to a BMI of 25.4 Kg/m2.
Discussion/conclusion: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass successfully reduces GERD symptoms by diverting bile away from the esophagus, decreasing acid production in the gastric pouch, therefore limiting the amount of acid reflux and by promoting weight loss decreases abdominal pressure over the lower esophageal sphincter and esophageal hiatus. In obese patients (BMI>35) with GERD, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass seems to be the most effective and advantageous treatment since it provides control of GERD symptoms with the additional benefit of weight loss. In patients who have previously undergone anti-reflux surgery, bariatric surgery can be technically demanding. However, if performed by high-volume surgeons in high-volume centers, it is perfectly feasible with low morbidity and excellent results.
J Magalhães, AM Pereira, T Fonseca, R Ferreira de Almeida, M Nora
Surgical intervention
4 months ago
1213 views
3 likes
1 comment
09:34
Laparoscopic revision of Nissen fundoplication to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass
Introduction: Obesity is a known etiological factor for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and is also a growing public health concern. Although Nissen fundoplication is a highly effective technique to treat GERD, it may fail in obese patients. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass provides excellent long-term control of GERD symptoms with the additional benefit of weight loss.
Clinical case: A 57-year-old woman underwent a laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication for GERD (BMI 30.0 Kg/m2) with excellent outcomes during the first postoperative year in 2011. Two years later, GERD symptoms recurred, and her weight increased progressively (BMI of 36.0 Kg/m2). The patient was proposed to a laparoscopic conversion of Nissen fundoplication to a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. The procedure was uneventful, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 4. One year later, she remained asymptomatic, off antacids medication, and with her weight decreased to 63.5Kg which corresponded to a BMI of 25.4 Kg/m2.
Discussion/conclusion: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass successfully reduces GERD symptoms by diverting bile away from the esophagus, decreasing acid production in the gastric pouch, therefore limiting the amount of acid reflux and by promoting weight loss decreases abdominal pressure over the lower esophageal sphincter and esophageal hiatus. In obese patients (BMI>35) with GERD, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass seems to be the most effective and advantageous treatment since it provides control of GERD symptoms with the additional benefit of weight loss. In patients who have previously undergone anti-reflux surgery, bariatric surgery can be technically demanding. However, if performed by high-volume surgeons in high-volume centers, it is perfectly feasible with low morbidity and excellent results.
LIVE UNCUT SURGERY: laparoscopic cholecystectomy for cholelithiasis, a gold standard procedure
This video describes an "ideal" cholecystectomy, with a stepwise approach to the cystic pedicle and the dissection of the gallbladder. This video emphasizes the key points of dissection necessary to perform a safe cholecystectomy.
The initial approach aims to expose the infundibulum and to successively dissect the anterior and posterior reflection of the peritoneum. It provides a safe view of the cystic duct and the cystic artery which can be dissected in order to secure the “critical view of safety”, exposing the cystic artery clearly away from the common bile duct and the right hepatic artery. This highlights the risky parts of the dissection when rules are not respected.
After complete control of the pedicle, freeing of the gallbladder in the appropriate plane avoids any oozing, keeping the operative field totally clear and safe.
Finally, the video shows the extraction method for the gallbladder, allowing the procedure to be performed with three 5mm ports and one 10-12mm port, thereby limiting the risk of postoperative port-site hernia.
This 20-minute live uncut video is a demonstration of a gold standard procedure.
D Mutter, G Philouze, B Seeliger, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
4 months ago
9628 views
46 likes
14 comments
30:23
LIVE UNCUT SURGERY: laparoscopic cholecystectomy for cholelithiasis, a gold standard procedure
This video describes an "ideal" cholecystectomy, with a stepwise approach to the cystic pedicle and the dissection of the gallbladder. This video emphasizes the key points of dissection necessary to perform a safe cholecystectomy.
The initial approach aims to expose the infundibulum and to successively dissect the anterior and posterior reflection of the peritoneum. It provides a safe view of the cystic duct and the cystic artery which can be dissected in order to secure the “critical view of safety”, exposing the cystic artery clearly away from the common bile duct and the right hepatic artery. This highlights the risky parts of the dissection when rules are not respected.
After complete control of the pedicle, freeing of the gallbladder in the appropriate plane avoids any oozing, keeping the operative field totally clear and safe.
Finally, the video shows the extraction method for the gallbladder, allowing the procedure to be performed with three 5mm ports and one 10-12mm port, thereby limiting the risk of postoperative port-site hernia.
This 20-minute live uncut video is a demonstration of a gold standard procedure.
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a patient with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura
Morbid obesity surgery, which induces a rapid weight loss, is a predisposing factor for the onset of gallstones. There are treatments which help to reduce this risk. However, the observance is poor and lithogenicity brings about risks of complications such as cholecystitis, stone migration, and acute pancreatitis.
This video demonstrates the case of a patient who underwent a sleeve gastrectomy with a substantial weight loss. Stone migration was found along with a less serious pancreatic response. During a blood test analysis, thrombocytopenia was found and investigated by hematologists. Besides a low platelet count, a qualitative anomaly was observed increasing the risk of bleeding. Despite of this, cholecystectomy was necessary to prevent any new stone migration.
The operator was skilled and used a conventional laparoscopic approach. The patient’s liver is the site of a nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), making the procedure even more complex. Four ports were placed to allow for an adequate gallbladder retraction and for a minute dissection. Calot’s triangle was classically approached first as soon as the adhesions between the omentum and the gallbladder were taken down. Due to a thickened and inflammatory cystic duct, the entire gallbladder was dissected before ligating the cystic duct with two ligatures, one of them being reinforced by means of a surgical loop.
M Vix, B Seeliger, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
4 months ago
653 views
2 likes
0 comments
13:25
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a patient with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura
Morbid obesity surgery, which induces a rapid weight loss, is a predisposing factor for the onset of gallstones. There are treatments which help to reduce this risk. However, the observance is poor and lithogenicity brings about risks of complications such as cholecystitis, stone migration, and acute pancreatitis.
This video demonstrates the case of a patient who underwent a sleeve gastrectomy with a substantial weight loss. Stone migration was found along with a less serious pancreatic response. During a blood test analysis, thrombocytopenia was found and investigated by hematologists. Besides a low platelet count, a qualitative anomaly was observed increasing the risk of bleeding. Despite of this, cholecystectomy was necessary to prevent any new stone migration.
The operator was skilled and used a conventional laparoscopic approach. The patient’s liver is the site of a nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), making the procedure even more complex. Four ports were placed to allow for an adequate gallbladder retraction and for a minute dissection. Calot’s triangle was classically approached first as soon as the adhesions between the omentum and the gallbladder were taken down. Due to a thickened and inflammatory cystic duct, the entire gallbladder was dissected before ligating the cystic duct with two ligatures, one of them being reinforced by means of a surgical loop.
Laparoscopic subtotal gastrectomy with ICG-oriented extended D2 (D2+) lymphadenectomy
The concept of fluorescence-guided navigation surgery based on indocyanine green (ICG) testifies to a developing interest in many fields of surgical oncology. The technique seems to be promising, also during nodal dissection in gastric and colorectal surgery in the so-called “ICG-guided nodal navigation”.
In this video, we present the clinical case of 36-year-old man with a seeming early stage antral gastric adenocarcinoma, as preoperatively defined, submitted to a laparoscopic subtotal gastrectomy and D2+ lymphadenectomy.
Before surgery, the patient was submitted to endoscopy with the objective to inject indocyanine green near the tumor (2mL injected into the mucosa 2cm proximally and 2cm distally to the tumor) in order to visualize the lymphatic basin of that tumor during the operation.
Thanks to the ICG’s fluorescence with the light emitted from the photodynamic eye of our laparoscopic system (Stryker 1588® camera), it is possible to clearly visualize both the individual lymph nodes and the lymphatic collectors which drain ICG (and lymph) of the specific mucosal area previously marked with indocyanine green.
This technique could allow for a more precise and radical nodal dissection and a safer work respecting vascular and nerve structures.
G Baiocchi, S Molfino, B Molteni, L Arru, F Gheza, M Diana
Surgical intervention
4 months ago
2761 views
9 likes
1 comment
12:41
Laparoscopic subtotal gastrectomy with ICG-oriented extended D2 (D2+) lymphadenectomy
The concept of fluorescence-guided navigation surgery based on indocyanine green (ICG) testifies to a developing interest in many fields of surgical oncology. The technique seems to be promising, also during nodal dissection in gastric and colorectal surgery in the so-called “ICG-guided nodal navigation”.
In this video, we present the clinical case of 36-year-old man with a seeming early stage antral gastric adenocarcinoma, as preoperatively defined, submitted to a laparoscopic subtotal gastrectomy and D2+ lymphadenectomy.
Before surgery, the patient was submitted to endoscopy with the objective to inject indocyanine green near the tumor (2mL injected into the mucosa 2cm proximally and 2cm distally to the tumor) in order to visualize the lymphatic basin of that tumor during the operation.
Thanks to the ICG’s fluorescence with the light emitted from the photodynamic eye of our laparoscopic system (Stryker 1588® camera), it is possible to clearly visualize both the individual lymph nodes and the lymphatic collectors which drain ICG (and lymph) of the specific mucosal area previously marked with indocyanine green.
This technique could allow for a more precise and radical nodal dissection and a safer work respecting vascular and nerve structures.
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy for cholelithiasis, a gold standard procedure
This video describes an "ideal" cholecystectomy, with a stepwise approach to the cystic pedicle and the dissection of the gallbladder. This video emphasizes the key points of dissection necessary to perform a safe cholecystectomy. The initial approach aims to expose the infundibulum and to successively dissect the anterior and posterior reflection of the peritoneum. It provides a safe view of the cystic duct and the cystic artery which can be dissected in order to secure the “critical view of safety”, exposing the cystic artery clearly away from the common bile duct and the right hepatic artery. This highlights the risky parts of the dissection when rules are not respected. After complete control of the pedicle, freeing of the gallbladder in the appropriate plane avoids any oozing, keeping the operative field totally clear and safe. Finally, the video shows the extraction method for the gallbladder, allowing the procedure to be performed with three 5mm ports and one 10-12mm port, thereby limiting the risk of postoperative port-site hernia. This 20-minute live uncut video is a demonstration of a gold standard procedure.
D Mutter, G Philouze, B Seeliger, J Marescaux
How to
4 months ago
9614 views
46 likes
14 comments
00:30:23
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy for cholelithiasis, a gold standard procedure
This video describes an "ideal" cholecystectomy, with a stepwise approach to the cystic pedicle and the dissection of the gallbladder. This video emphasizes the key points of dissection necessary to perform a safe cholecystectomy. The initial approach aims to expose the infundibulum and to successively dissect the anterior and posterior reflection of the peritoneum. It provides a safe view of the cystic duct and the cystic artery which can be dissected in order to secure the “critical view of safety”, exposing the cystic artery clearly away from the common bile duct and the right hepatic artery. This highlights the risky parts of the dissection when rules are not respected. After complete control of the pedicle, freeing of the gallbladder in the appropriate plane avoids any oozing, keeping the operative field totally clear and safe. Finally, the video shows the extraction method for the gallbladder, allowing the procedure to be performed with three 5mm ports and one 10-12mm port, thereby limiting the risk of postoperative port-site hernia. This 20-minute live uncut video is a demonstration of a gold standard procedure.
Totally laparoscopic splenic flexure resection for cancer
The objective of this video is to demonstrate a laparoscopic segmental oncological splenic flexure colonic resection for cancer. Splenic flexure carcinoma is a rare condition, as it represents 3 to 8% of all colon cancers. It is associated with a high risk of obstruction and a poor prognosis. The surgical approach is challenging and not fully standardized. The resected area must include the mesocolon with major vessels ligation at their origin, in order to reduce local recurrence via the complete removal of potentially involved lymph node stations.
The oncological effectiveness of a segmental resection could be determined by the peculiar lymphatic spread of splenic flexure cancers. Different studies showed that the majority of positive lymph nodes among patients with splenic flexure carcinoma are distributed along the paracolic arcade and the left colic artery. As a result, a segmental resection associated with a medial-to-lateral approach could be safe and effective. The experience with a totally laparoscopic approach with intracorporeal anastomosis is well described in the current literature. Additionally, an intracorporeal anastomosis minimizes the risk of bowel twisting, preventing the exteriorization of the stumps, and reducing bowel traction, which can affect anastomotic irrigation, especially in obese patients. In a setting of surgeons experienced with laparoscopic colorectal surgery, the outcomes of laparoscopic segmental resection of splenic flexure are similar to those of laparoscopic resections for cancer in other locations.
G Basili, D Pietrasanta, N Romano, AF Costa
Surgical intervention
5 months ago
2343 views
8 likes
0 comments
10:12
Totally laparoscopic splenic flexure resection for cancer
The objective of this video is to demonstrate a laparoscopic segmental oncological splenic flexure colonic resection for cancer. Splenic flexure carcinoma is a rare condition, as it represents 3 to 8% of all colon cancers. It is associated with a high risk of obstruction and a poor prognosis. The surgical approach is challenging and not fully standardized. The resected area must include the mesocolon with major vessels ligation at their origin, in order to reduce local recurrence via the complete removal of potentially involved lymph node stations.
The oncological effectiveness of a segmental resection could be determined by the peculiar lymphatic spread of splenic flexure cancers. Different studies showed that the majority of positive lymph nodes among patients with splenic flexure carcinoma are distributed along the paracolic arcade and the left colic artery. As a result, a segmental resection associated with a medial-to-lateral approach could be safe and effective. The experience with a totally laparoscopic approach with intracorporeal anastomosis is well described in the current literature. Additionally, an intracorporeal anastomosis minimizes the risk of bowel twisting, preventing the exteriorization of the stumps, and reducing bowel traction, which can affect anastomotic irrigation, especially in obese patients. In a setting of surgeons experienced with laparoscopic colorectal surgery, the outcomes of laparoscopic segmental resection of splenic flexure are similar to those of laparoscopic resections for cancer in other locations.
Laparoscopic right colectomy: bottom-to-up approach with intracorporeal anastomosis
Introduction
Laparoscopic right colectomy (LRC) has become a well-established technique in colon cancer treatment achieving the same degree of radicality as open colectomy with the advantages of minimal invasion. A medial-to-lateral approach is the standard technique, but the bottom-to-up approach, with intracorporeal anastomosis (BTU), has recently gained popularity among surgeons.
Clinical case
The authors report the case of a 70-year-old male patient with persistent abdominal discomfort and a change in bowel habits. Preoperative staging revealed an adenocarcinoma at the hepatic flexure of the colon with no metastatic disease. The patient was proposed for a laparoscopic right colectomy.
A bottom-to-up approach was performed by opening an avascular plane posterior to the right mesocolon, creating a mesenteric route cranially along Gerota’s fascia until the duodenum and liver have been exposed. A side-to-side ileocolic intracorporeal stapled anastomosis was fashioned. The procedure and postoperative recovery were uneventful.
Discussion/Conclusion
LRC using a BTU approach is a feasible and safe alternative to the conventional medial-to-lateral approach. The main advantages are a short learning curve and an easy access to the retroperitoneal space with direct visualization and protection of retroperitoneal structures. The performance of an intracorporeal anastomosis offers the advantage of a smaller extraction incision, lower wound-related complications, and fast recovery.
J Magalhães, L Matos, J Costa, J Costa Pereira, G Gonçalves, M Nora
Surgical intervention
5 months ago
1967 views
10 likes
3 comments
10:31
Laparoscopic right colectomy: bottom-to-up approach with intracorporeal anastomosis
Introduction
Laparoscopic right colectomy (LRC) has become a well-established technique in colon cancer treatment achieving the same degree of radicality as open colectomy with the advantages of minimal invasion. A medial-to-lateral approach is the standard technique, but the bottom-to-up approach, with intracorporeal anastomosis (BTU), has recently gained popularity among surgeons.
Clinical case
The authors report the case of a 70-year-old male patient with persistent abdominal discomfort and a change in bowel habits. Preoperative staging revealed an adenocarcinoma at the hepatic flexure of the colon with no metastatic disease. The patient was proposed for a laparoscopic right colectomy.
A bottom-to-up approach was performed by opening an avascular plane posterior to the right mesocolon, creating a mesenteric route cranially along Gerota’s fascia until the duodenum and liver have been exposed. A side-to-side ileocolic intracorporeal stapled anastomosis was fashioned. The procedure and postoperative recovery were uneventful.
Discussion/Conclusion
LRC using a BTU approach is a feasible and safe alternative to the conventional medial-to-lateral approach. The main advantages are a short learning curve and an easy access to the retroperitoneal space with direct visualization and protection of retroperitoneal structures. The performance of an intracorporeal anastomosis offers the advantage of a smaller extraction incision, lower wound-related complications, and fast recovery.
Laparoscopic rectal resection with ICG-guided nodal navigation
The concept of fluorescence-guided navigation surgery based on indocyanine green (ICG) testifies to a developing interest in many fields of surgical oncology. The technique seems to be promising, also during nodal dissection in gastric and colorectal surgery in the so-called “ICG-guided nodal navigation”.
In this video, we present the clinical case of a 66-year-old woman with a sigmoid-rectal junction early stage cancer submitted to laparoscopic resection. Before surgery, the patient was submitted to endoscopy with the objective to mark the distal margin of the neoplasia, and 2mL of ICG were injected into the mucosa of the rectum, 2cm distal to the inferior border of the tumor.
Thanks to the ICG’s fluorescence with the light emitted from the photodynamic eye of our laparoscopic system (Stryker 1588 camera system), it is possible to clearly visualize both the individual lymph nodes and the lymphatic collectors which drain ICG (and lymph) of the specific mucosal area previously marked with indocyanine green.
It was possible to verify the good perfusion of the proximal stump of the anastomosis before the Knight-Griffen anastomosis was performed, thanks to an intravenous injection of ICG.
This technique could allow for a more precise and radical nodal dissection, a safer work respecting vascular and nerve structures, and could be related with a lower risk of anastomotic fistula, controlling the adequate perfusion of the stump.
G Baiocchi, S Molfino, B Molteni, A Titi, G Gaverini
Surgical intervention
6 months ago
2776 views
5 likes
1 comment
11:48
Laparoscopic rectal resection with ICG-guided nodal navigation
The concept of fluorescence-guided navigation surgery based on indocyanine green (ICG) testifies to a developing interest in many fields of surgical oncology. The technique seems to be promising, also during nodal dissection in gastric and colorectal surgery in the so-called “ICG-guided nodal navigation”.
In this video, we present the clinical case of a 66-year-old woman with a sigmoid-rectal junction early stage cancer submitted to laparoscopic resection. Before surgery, the patient was submitted to endoscopy with the objective to mark the distal margin of the neoplasia, and 2mL of ICG were injected into the mucosa of the rectum, 2cm distal to the inferior border of the tumor.
Thanks to the ICG’s fluorescence with the light emitted from the photodynamic eye of our laparoscopic system (Stryker 1588 camera system), it is possible to clearly visualize both the individual lymph nodes and the lymphatic collectors which drain ICG (and lymph) of the specific mucosal area previously marked with indocyanine green.
It was possible to verify the good perfusion of the proximal stump of the anastomosis before the Knight-Griffen anastomosis was performed, thanks to an intravenous injection of ICG.
This technique could allow for a more precise and radical nodal dissection, a safer work respecting vascular and nerve structures, and could be related with a lower risk of anastomotic fistula, controlling the adequate perfusion of the stump.
Combined abdominal - transanal laparoscopic approach (taTME) for low rectal cancers
Objective: to describe the TaTME surgical technique for the treatment of low rectal cancers.
Methods: The procedure was performed in two phases: first, by an abdominal laparoscopic approach consisting in the high ligation of the inferior mesenteric artery and vein, and complete splenic flexure mobilization. The pelvic dissection was continued in the Total Mesorectal Excision (TME) plane to the level of the puborectal sling posteriorly and of the seminal vesicles anteriorly.
Secondly, the procedure continued by transanal laparoscopic approach: A Lone Star® retractor was placed prior to the platform insertion (Gelpoint Path®). Under direct vision of the tumor, a purse-string suture was performed to obtain a secure distal margin and a completed closure of the lumen. It is essential to achieve a complete circumferential full-thickness rectotomy before facing the dissection cranially via the TME plane. Both planes, transanal and abdominal, are connected by the two surgical teams. The specimen was then extracted through a suprapubic incision. A circular end-to-end stapled anastomosis was made intracorporeally. Finally, a loop ileostomy was performed.
Results: A 75-year-old man with low rectal cancer (uT3N1-Rullier’s I-II classification), was treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and TaTME. Operative time was 240 minutes, including 90 minutes for the perineal phase. There were no postoperative complications and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 5. The pathology report showed a complete mesorectum excision and free margins (ypT1N1a).
Conclusions: The TaTME technique is a safe option for the treatment of low rectal cancers, especially in male patients with a narrow pelvis. It is a feasible and reproducible technique for surgeons with previous experience in advanced laparoscopic procedures and transanal surgery.
S Qian, P Tejedor, M Leon, M Ortega, C Pastor
Surgical intervention
6 months ago
3538 views
5 likes
2 comments
06:45
Combined abdominal - transanal laparoscopic approach (taTME) for low rectal cancers
Objective: to describe the TaTME surgical technique for the treatment of low rectal cancers.
Methods: The procedure was performed in two phases: first, by an abdominal laparoscopic approach consisting in the high ligation of the inferior mesenteric artery and vein, and complete splenic flexure mobilization. The pelvic dissection was continued in the Total Mesorectal Excision (TME) plane to the level of the puborectal sling posteriorly and of the seminal vesicles anteriorly.
Secondly, the procedure continued by transanal laparoscopic approach: A Lone Star® retractor was placed prior to the platform insertion (Gelpoint Path®). Under direct vision of the tumor, a purse-string suture was performed to obtain a secure distal margin and a completed closure of the lumen. It is essential to achieve a complete circumferential full-thickness rectotomy before facing the dissection cranially via the TME plane. Both planes, transanal and abdominal, are connected by the two surgical teams. The specimen was then extracted through a suprapubic incision. A circular end-to-end stapled anastomosis was made intracorporeally. Finally, a loop ileostomy was performed.
Results: A 75-year-old man with low rectal cancer (uT3N1-Rullier’s I-II classification), was treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and TaTME. Operative time was 240 minutes, including 90 minutes for the perineal phase. There were no postoperative complications and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 5. The pathology report showed a complete mesorectum excision and free margins (ypT1N1a).
Conclusions: The TaTME technique is a safe option for the treatment of low rectal cancers, especially in male patients with a narrow pelvis. It is a feasible and reproducible technique for surgeons with previous experience in advanced laparoscopic procedures and transanal surgery.
Laparoscopic splenic flexure mobilization during low anterior resection (LAR), extra central connection between the superior and inferior mesenteric arterial systems
This is the case of two adult patients who presented with a low rectal carcinoma. A low anterior resection was performed laparoscopically. In both cases, the procedure was begun with a mobilization of the splenic flexure to ensure sufficient length on the proximal colonic segment to facilitate a tension-free low colorectal anastomosis. In the first case, a small aberrant artery, and during the second case, an aberrant artery of greater caliber can be appreciated. Anatomical studies report an extra central arterial connection between the superior and inferior mesenteric arterial systems in addition to the marginal artery of Drummond in 10 to 30% of cases. In such cases, there is an extra connection from the ascending branch of the left colic artery to the middle colic artery or the marginal artery of Drummond. Different names have been given to these connections, such as for example the meandering mesenteric artery, the artery of Moskovitch and Riolan’s arch.
A Wijsmuller, RJ Franken, JB Tuynman, J Bonjer
Surgical intervention
6 months ago
5172 views
16 likes
0 comments
19:46
Laparoscopic splenic flexure mobilization during low anterior resection (LAR), extra central connection between the superior and inferior mesenteric arterial systems
This is the case of two adult patients who presented with a low rectal carcinoma. A low anterior resection was performed laparoscopically. In both cases, the procedure was begun with a mobilization of the splenic flexure to ensure sufficient length on the proximal colonic segment to facilitate a tension-free low colorectal anastomosis. In the first case, a small aberrant artery, and during the second case, an aberrant artery of greater caliber can be appreciated. Anatomical studies report an extra central arterial connection between the superior and inferior mesenteric arterial systems in addition to the marginal artery of Drummond in 10 to 30% of cases. In such cases, there is an extra connection from the ascending branch of the left colic artery to the middle colic artery or the marginal artery of Drummond. Different names have been given to these connections, such as for example the meandering mesenteric artery, the artery of Moskovitch and Riolan’s arch.
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: fully comprehensive demonstration of laparoscopic left hemicolectomy for synchronous adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon and rectosigmoid junction in an obese patient
In this live interactive surgery, Dr. Salvador Morales-Conde presents a case of synchronous sigmoid and rectosigmoid adenocarcinoma in an obese patient (BMI of 30). During mucosectomy of a sigmoid polyp at 20cm from the anal verge, a pTis adenocarcinoma was diagnosed when completely resected. A pT1 adenocarcinoma was biopsied at the rectosigmoid junction (12-15cm from the anal verge). Staging revealed no distant metastases. The operative technique shown consists in an oncological resection with mobilization of the splenic flexure.
S Morales-Conde, B Seeliger, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
6 months ago
4434 views
7 likes
0 comments
43:25
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: fully comprehensive demonstration of laparoscopic left hemicolectomy for synchronous adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon and rectosigmoid junction in an obese patient
In this live interactive surgery, Dr. Salvador Morales-Conde presents a case of synchronous sigmoid and rectosigmoid adenocarcinoma in an obese patient (BMI of 30). During mucosectomy of a sigmoid polyp at 20cm from the anal verge, a pTis adenocarcinoma was diagnosed when completely resected. A pT1 adenocarcinoma was biopsied at the rectosigmoid junction (12-15cm from the anal verge). Staging revealed no distant metastases. The operative technique shown consists in an oncological resection with mobilization of the splenic flexure.
Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy for a recurrent GIST
GISTs are tumors of the gastrointestinal stroma which, although rare, are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the digestive tract. They are most common in the stomach and small intestine, in patients aged between 50 and 70 years. The definitive diagnosis is established with immunohistochemistry (CD117), and the risk of postoperative recurrence should be estimated. Studies relate small intestine’s lesions with greater aggressiveness; however, more recent studies emphasize mitotic index and lesion size.
The clinical case is that of a 53-year-old woman with a stage TNM IIIb, AFIP 6b gastric GIST. In 2013, she underwent a sleeve gastrectomy followed by the daily administration of Imatinib (400mg). After 3 years of adjuvant therapy, she stopped treatment. In May 2017, in a follow-up CT-scan, a solid, heterogeneous 6.7cm lesion appeared in the left hypochondrium, separated from the metal suture, invading the lower pole of the spleen, with no evidence of adenopathies or free liquid.
Surgical resection was planned. A splenectomy with distal pancreatectomy, documented in the video, was performed with no complications. The histological examination confirmed a 5.8cm tumor implant, located in the splenic cord, compatible with GIST recurrence (>50 mitoses/50 fields, free margins, prognostic group 6b).
JP Pinto, T Moreno, D Poletto, A Toscano, M Lozano
Surgical intervention
7 months ago
2029 views
4 likes
0 comments
14:02
Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy for a recurrent GIST
GISTs are tumors of the gastrointestinal stroma which, although rare, are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the digestive tract. They are most common in the stomach and small intestine, in patients aged between 50 and 70 years. The definitive diagnosis is established with immunohistochemistry (CD117), and the risk of postoperative recurrence should be estimated. Studies relate small intestine’s lesions with greater aggressiveness; however, more recent studies emphasize mitotic index and lesion size.
The clinical case is that of a 53-year-old woman with a stage TNM IIIb, AFIP 6b gastric GIST. In 2013, she underwent a sleeve gastrectomy followed by the daily administration of Imatinib (400mg). After 3 years of adjuvant therapy, she stopped treatment. In May 2017, in a follow-up CT-scan, a solid, heterogeneous 6.7cm lesion appeared in the left hypochondrium, separated from the metal suture, invading the lower pole of the spleen, with no evidence of adenopathies or free liquid.
Surgical resection was planned. A splenectomy with distal pancreatectomy, documented in the video, was performed with no complications. The histological examination confirmed a 5.8cm tumor implant, located in the splenic cord, compatible with GIST recurrence (>50 mitoses/50 fields, free margins, prognostic group 6b).
Laparoscopic left hemicolectomy in a thin patient, including anastomotic control using intraoperative fluorescence
Usually, Body Mass Index (BMI) is correlated to the difficulty in performing the surgery. Obesity is associated with a more complex surgery and a longer operative time due to difficulties in finding the right plane of dissection and identifying the structures. However, treating a thin patient may also be dangerous because the planes of dissection are more adherent, which makes it harder to identify the real embryological dissection plane.
This video shows the danger of dissection when the mesocolon is very thin and adherent to Toldt’s fascia or Gerota’s fascia.

The nightmare of colon and rectum surgery is the leak of the anastomosis. It may occur also with all precaution: no anastomotic tension, the evaluation of the vascularization may be difficult because macroscopic lesion, when there is an ischemia, would appear after some hours; the use of the ICG test is a good tool to control the poor vascularization of the anastomosis earlier and to correct it, hence avoiding the drama of the leak.
S Rua
Surgical intervention
7 months ago
3054 views
11 likes
0 comments
13:14
Laparoscopic left hemicolectomy in a thin patient, including anastomotic control using intraoperative fluorescence
Usually, Body Mass Index (BMI) is correlated to the difficulty in performing the surgery. Obesity is associated with a more complex surgery and a longer operative time due to difficulties in finding the right plane of dissection and identifying the structures. However, treating a thin patient may also be dangerous because the planes of dissection are more adherent, which makes it harder to identify the real embryological dissection plane.
This video shows the danger of dissection when the mesocolon is very thin and adherent to Toldt’s fascia or Gerota’s fascia.

The nightmare of colon and rectum surgery is the leak of the anastomosis. It may occur also with all precaution: no anastomotic tension, the evaluation of the vascularization may be difficult because macroscopic lesion, when there is an ischemia, would appear after some hours; the use of the ICG test is a good tool to control the poor vascularization of the anastomosis earlier and to correct it, hence avoiding the drama of the leak.
Giant hiatal hernia: pleural incision helping defect closure without tension
Incidence of hiatal hernias (HH) increases with age. Approximately 60% of persons aged over 50 have a HH. Most of them are asymptomatic patients and may be discovered incidentally; others may be symptomatic and their presentation differs depending on hernia type.
We present the case of a 65-year-old woman, complaining of abdominal pain and vomiting. CT-scan showed a giant hiatal sliding hernia with almost the whole stomach in an intrathoracic position. Surgery was put forward to the patient for HH correction and Nissen procedure and she accepted it.
Although a uniform definition does not exist, a giant HH is considered a hernia which includes at least 30% of the stomach in the chest. Usually, a giant HH is a type III hernia with a sliding and paraesophageal component, and consequently patients may complain of pain, heartburn, dysphagia, and vomiting. Surgery ordinarily includes four steps: hernia sac dissection and resection, esophageal mobilization, crural repair, and fundoplication. To prevent tension due to a large hiatus, relaxation of the diaphragmatic crura can be associated with the use of a mesh. However, mesh use is still a matter of debate because of severe associated complications, such as erosions requiring gastric resection. In this case, we decided to deliberately make a pleural incision, in order to reduce tension preventing the use of a mesh with all of its potential complications. This procedure, already described by some authors, is not associated with respiratory complications because of the difference in abdominal and respiratory pressures observed in laparoscopic surgery. The patient progressed favorably and was discharged asymptomatically on postoperative day 2.
C Viana, M Lozano, D Poletto, T Moreno, C Varela, A Toscano
Surgical intervention
7 months ago
2849 views
7 likes
1 comment
15:27
Giant hiatal hernia: pleural incision helping defect closure without tension
Incidence of hiatal hernias (HH) increases with age. Approximately 60% of persons aged over 50 have a HH. Most of them are asymptomatic patients and may be discovered incidentally; others may be symptomatic and their presentation differs depending on hernia type.
We present the case of a 65-year-old woman, complaining of abdominal pain and vomiting. CT-scan showed a giant hiatal sliding hernia with almost the whole stomach in an intrathoracic position. Surgery was put forward to the patient for HH correction and Nissen procedure and she accepted it.
Although a uniform definition does not exist, a giant HH is considered a hernia which includes at least 30% of the stomach in the chest. Usually, a giant HH is a type III hernia with a sliding and paraesophageal component, and consequently patients may complain of pain, heartburn, dysphagia, and vomiting. Surgery ordinarily includes four steps: hernia sac dissection and resection, esophageal mobilization, crural repair, and fundoplication. To prevent tension due to a large hiatus, relaxation of the diaphragmatic crura can be associated with the use of a mesh. However, mesh use is still a matter of debate because of severe associated complications, such as erosions requiring gastric resection. In this case, we decided to deliberately make a pleural incision, in order to reduce tension preventing the use of a mesh with all of its potential complications. This procedure, already described by some authors, is not associated with respiratory complications because of the difference in abdominal and respiratory pressures observed in laparoscopic surgery. The patient progressed favorably and was discharged asymptomatically on postoperative day 2.
Robotic triple docking ultralow anterior resection with intersphincteric resection and coloanal anastomosis
The da Vinci™ surgical robotic system with its increased instrument stability, magnified tridimensional view, and dexterity with 7 degrees of wristed motion of its instruments offers a distinct surgical advantage over traditional laparoscopic instruments. This is especially true in the deep pelvis, where the limited space and visibility make it extremely challenging to perform distal rectal dissection. Additionally, the complete control of the surgeon over the stable surgical platform allows fine and accurate dissection in this area.
For very low rectal tumors close to the anorectal junction, if a sphincter-saving procedure is to be attempted, surgeons will frequently perform an intersphincteric resection (ISR) with a handsewn coloanal anastomosis. If successful, the patient will be able to avoid an abdominoperineal resection and its resulting permanent stoma.
ISR is a technically challenging procedure to perform, especially in male and obese patients. It is because the approach to the intersphincteric plane from the abdominal approach is deep within the pelvis and frequently curves anteriorly, which makes the intersphincteric plane challenging to approach laparoscopically. In addition, ISR from the perineum is also difficult as the anus has a small opening; as a result, when the surgeon sits directly in front of the perineum, assistants will be unable to adequately visualize the operating field, making it very challenging to properly assist for the dissection. It may potentially result in some blind dissection, which may lead to entry into the wrong plane and a poor oncological specimen.
With the da Vinci™ surgical robotic system, this problem can potentially be minimized. First, via the transabdominal approach, the robotic system is able to access deep into the pelvic cavity and dissect down to the intersphincteric plane beyond the puborectalis sling. Secondly, docking the robot and approaching the ISR perineally, the robotic system can also provide a magnified vision, a fine dissection and allow the assistant a good viewing position sitting in front of the perineum to assist in a more productive manner. These advantages of the robotic system will facilitate ISR dissection and retrieval of a superior oncological specimen.
This video features a totally robotic triple docking approach for an ultralow anterior resection with intersphincteric resection and handsewn coloanal anastomosis in a male patient with a low rectal cancer.
SAE Yeo
Surgical intervention
7 months ago
1515 views
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15:36
Robotic triple docking ultralow anterior resection with intersphincteric resection and coloanal anastomosis
The da Vinci™ surgical robotic system with its increased instrument stability, magnified tridimensional view, and dexterity with 7 degrees of wristed motion of its instruments offers a distinct surgical advantage over traditional laparoscopic instruments. This is especially true in the deep pelvis, where the limited space and visibility make it extremely challenging to perform distal rectal dissection. Additionally, the complete control of the surgeon over the stable surgical platform allows fine and accurate dissection in this area.
For very low rectal tumors close to the anorectal junction, if a sphincter-saving procedure is to be attempted, surgeons will frequently perform an intersphincteric resection (ISR) with a handsewn coloanal anastomosis. If successful, the patient will be able to avoid an abdominoperineal resection and its resulting permanent stoma.
ISR is a technically challenging procedure to perform, especially in male and obese patients. It is because the approach to the intersphincteric plane from the abdominal approach is deep within the pelvis and frequently curves anteriorly, which makes the intersphincteric plane challenging to approach laparoscopically. In addition, ISR from the perineum is also difficult as the anus has a small opening; as a result, when the surgeon sits directly in front of the perineum, assistants will be unable to adequately visualize the operating field, making it very challenging to properly assist for the dissection. It may potentially result in some blind dissection, which may lead to entry into the wrong plane and a poor oncological specimen.
With the da Vinci™ surgical robotic system, this problem can potentially be minimized. First, via the transabdominal approach, the robotic system is able to access deep into the pelvic cavity and dissect down to the intersphincteric plane beyond the puborectalis sling. Secondly, docking the robot and approaching the ISR perineally, the robotic system can also provide a magnified vision, a fine dissection and allow the assistant a good viewing position sitting in front of the perineum to assist in a more productive manner. These advantages of the robotic system will facilitate ISR dissection and retrieval of a superior oncological specimen.
This video features a totally robotic triple docking approach for an ultralow anterior resection with intersphincteric resection and handsewn coloanal anastomosis in a male patient with a low rectal cancer.