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Gynecology

Find all the surgical interventions, lectures, experts opinions, debates, webinars and operative techniques per specialty.
Laparoscopic management of bladder endometriosis
Endometriosis is an enigmatic disorder, which affects women in their reproductive age. Failure of recent clinical trials on non-surgical management of endometriosis confirms the role of surgery as a viable treatment of choice. However, recurrence after surgery is common. Recurrence rate varies according to the surgeon’s skills, instrumentation, surgical techniques, and to the postoperative intervention outcome. In patients with severe endometriosis, lesions usually involve the posterior cul-de-sac, anterior rectum, one or both pelvic sidewalls, involving the ureters, the rectosigmoid, and less commonly the anterior bladder, the appendix, and the small bowel. Ureteral retroperitoneal dissection becomes mandatory in extensive endometriosis due to pelvic anatomical distortion. It also leaves the bowel intact without injuring it as the pseudo-peritoneum is lifted along with the inflamed bowel. Consequently, in the surgical practice of benign pathologies, a proper knowledge of the retroperitoneal anatomy ensures complete clearance in cases of advanced endometriosis and frozen pelvis. Here, we present a very interesting case of bladder endometriosis associated with hematuria during menstruation. Partial cystectomy is the treatment of choice for patients with bladder endometriosis in most cases. Provided surgeons are skilled and lesions require no ureteral reimplantation, operative laparoscopy is a valid alternative to laparotomy for partial cystectomy.
D Limbachiya
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
2074 views
65 likes
0 comments
06:56
Laparoscopic management of bladder endometriosis
Endometriosis is an enigmatic disorder, which affects women in their reproductive age. Failure of recent clinical trials on non-surgical management of endometriosis confirms the role of surgery as a viable treatment of choice. However, recurrence after surgery is common. Recurrence rate varies according to the surgeon’s skills, instrumentation, surgical techniques, and to the postoperative intervention outcome. In patients with severe endometriosis, lesions usually involve the posterior cul-de-sac, anterior rectum, one or both pelvic sidewalls, involving the ureters, the rectosigmoid, and less commonly the anterior bladder, the appendix, and the small bowel. Ureteral retroperitoneal dissection becomes mandatory in extensive endometriosis due to pelvic anatomical distortion. It also leaves the bowel intact without injuring it as the pseudo-peritoneum is lifted along with the inflamed bowel. Consequently, in the surgical practice of benign pathologies, a proper knowledge of the retroperitoneal anatomy ensures complete clearance in cases of advanced endometriosis and frozen pelvis. Here, we present a very interesting case of bladder endometriosis associated with hematuria during menstruation. Partial cystectomy is the treatment of choice for patients with bladder endometriosis in most cases. Provided surgeons are skilled and lesions require no ureteral reimplantation, operative laparoscopy is a valid alternative to laparotomy for partial cystectomy.
Laparoscopic partial cystectomy for big bladder endometriosis nodule
Bladder endometriosis is the most common presentation of urinary tract endometriosis and is frequently associated with specific symptoms such as dysuria, hematuria and recurrent urinary tract infections. Although it may be associated with ureteral endometriosis in severe cases, in most cases, it presents as an isolated disease.
The laparoscopic approach for bladder endometriosis nodule excision requires careful dissection of the paravesical spaces and identification of both ureters entering each ureteral tunnel. The shaving technique until healthy tissue is reached should be attempted, but if mucosal invasion is found, complete wall excision should be performed. In some occasions, when the nodule invades the bladder trigone, a double-J catheter may be inserted and left in place for 6 to 8 weeks.
In this video, we present the case of a 23-year-old woman complaining with significant dysuria associated with hematuria, dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia, and chronic pelvic pain. Magnetic resonance imaging described a 5cm nodule located in the bladder dome, and cystoscopy confirmed the diagnosis. The patient was referred to our Endometriosis Centre after diagnostic laparoscopy.
A Wattiez, J Albornoz, M Puga, E Faller
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
1749 views
24 likes
0 comments
32:41
Laparoscopic partial cystectomy for big bladder endometriosis nodule
Bladder endometriosis is the most common presentation of urinary tract endometriosis and is frequently associated with specific symptoms such as dysuria, hematuria and recurrent urinary tract infections. Although it may be associated with ureteral endometriosis in severe cases, in most cases, it presents as an isolated disease.
The laparoscopic approach for bladder endometriosis nodule excision requires careful dissection of the paravesical spaces and identification of both ureters entering each ureteral tunnel. The shaving technique until healthy tissue is reached should be attempted, but if mucosal invasion is found, complete wall excision should be performed. In some occasions, when the nodule invades the bladder trigone, a double-J catheter may be inserted and left in place for 6 to 8 weeks.
In this video, we present the case of a 23-year-old woman complaining with significant dysuria associated with hematuria, dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia, and chronic pelvic pain. Magnetic resonance imaging described a 5cm nodule located in the bladder dome, and cystoscopy confirmed the diagnosis. The patient was referred to our Endometriosis Centre after diagnostic laparoscopy.
Laparoscopic excision of bladder endometriosis
This is the case of a 34-year-old woman, G1P0010, with a long standing history of chronic pelvic and bladder pain occurring on a monthly basis. The patient has had laparoscopic diagnosis of endometriosis in the past with no resection performed at that time. Given cyclic bladder pain, the patient also underwent cystoscopy, which revealed an implant of bladder endometriosis measuring approximately 2cm in diameter. She has failed medical therapy including oral contraceptives and Lupron from several months. Given her continued bladder pain and severe dysmenorrhea and dyspareunia for the last 5 years, the decision was made to proceed with a surgical intervention.
Operating room specificities:
The patient was positioned in the dorsal lithotomy position with arms tucked bilaterally.
A 12mm port was placed within the umbilicus for the laparoscope. A 5mm port was placed in the left lower quadrant about 2cm superior to the left anterior superior iliac spine. Another 5mm port was placed in the right upper quadrant about 8cm lateral and 2cm inferior to the umbilical port. A final 12mm port was placed in the right lower quadrant, about 2cm superior to the right anterior superior iliac spine. A 7cm clear view uterine manipulator was used.
The primary surgeon was positioned on the left side of the patient. The main surgical assistant, the resident, was positioned on the right side of the patient. The secondary surgical assistant, the fellow, was positioned between the patient’s legs.
M Milad, L Griffin, I Moy, S Bulun
Surgical intervention
7 years ago
2003 views
23 likes
0 comments
03:59
Laparoscopic excision of bladder endometriosis
This is the case of a 34-year-old woman, G1P0010, with a long standing history of chronic pelvic and bladder pain occurring on a monthly basis. The patient has had laparoscopic diagnosis of endometriosis in the past with no resection performed at that time. Given cyclic bladder pain, the patient also underwent cystoscopy, which revealed an implant of bladder endometriosis measuring approximately 2cm in diameter. She has failed medical therapy including oral contraceptives and Lupron from several months. Given her continued bladder pain and severe dysmenorrhea and dyspareunia for the last 5 years, the decision was made to proceed with a surgical intervention.
Operating room specificities:
The patient was positioned in the dorsal lithotomy position with arms tucked bilaterally.
A 12mm port was placed within the umbilicus for the laparoscope. A 5mm port was placed in the left lower quadrant about 2cm superior to the left anterior superior iliac spine. Another 5mm port was placed in the right upper quadrant about 8cm lateral and 2cm inferior to the umbilical port. A final 12mm port was placed in the right lower quadrant, about 2cm superior to the right anterior superior iliac spine. A 7cm clear view uterine manipulator was used.
The primary surgeon was positioned on the left side of the patient. The main surgical assistant, the resident, was positioned on the right side of the patient. The secondary surgical assistant, the fellow, was positioned between the patient’s legs.
Laparoscopic total hysterectomy and unilateral adnexectomy with resection of urinary bladder nodule for endometriosis
This video demonstrates the technique of a total laparoscopic hysterectomy with unilateral adnexectomy and the excision of a vesical endometriotic nodule.
This patient is a 46-year-old lady with a previous surgical history of one laparotomy for a hemoperitoneum (endometriotic ovarian cyst rupture) and 6 laparoscopies because of endometriosis, the last one 3 years ago with a segmental sigmoid resection. After this last surgery, the patient starts to complain of dysmenorrhea, chronic pelvic pain and dysuria. She has never had any urinary infection.
Because of urinary stress incontinence, she had botulinic toxin injection and underwent a cystoscopy, which revealed a bladder nodule.
A Wattiez, S Barata, AM Furtado Lima, P Trompoukis, B Gabriel, J Nassif
Surgical intervention
8 years ago
429 views
30 likes
1 comment
10:14
Laparoscopic total hysterectomy and unilateral adnexectomy with resection of urinary bladder nodule for endometriosis
This video demonstrates the technique of a total laparoscopic hysterectomy with unilateral adnexectomy and the excision of a vesical endometriotic nodule.
This patient is a 46-year-old lady with a previous surgical history of one laparotomy for a hemoperitoneum (endometriotic ovarian cyst rupture) and 6 laparoscopies because of endometriosis, the last one 3 years ago with a segmental sigmoid resection. After this last surgery, the patient starts to complain of dysmenorrhea, chronic pelvic pain and dysuria. She has never had any urinary infection.
Because of urinary stress incontinence, she had botulinic toxin injection and underwent a cystoscopy, which revealed a bladder nodule.